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10 Cool Trends In Contemporary Ceramics


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#21 Stellaria

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 05:53 PM

Aaaaanyway, back to discussing "trendy" ceramics?

#22 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 07:13 PM

I'm not sure why the majority of posts here qualify ARTnews magazine to recognize trends in contemporary ceramics. They clearly missed a lot of work that is trending right now. It's not worth having a discussion with lemmings that don't bother to question sources. I'm pretty sure respected forum personalities (such as Mr. Baymore) frequently suggest being wary of sources. Instead of taking a couple of moments to research that ARTnews is a magazine that rarely bothers with the ceramic world, it seems the majority of you have taken the article as fact and argued moot points. This is evidenced by the artists that they're representing in their article. Jeffry Mitchell for example is a painter and print maker, represented in the article. He just started making sculptural work in 2012, when the first and latest sculptural ceramic show he had, took place at a small gallery in LA. Please let me know how his story plays into "trends in contemporary ceramics..." I don't have time to write more, but please, please, please read and think critically!



#23 Wyndham

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 07:14 PM

You're right, soooo, is trendy for trendy sake make for a trendy Sake set. :unsure: Who sets the trends, an honest question really. How do we evaluate the trend. Is it based on "who" set the trend. Is it the market the trend generates or ????

I look at the color trends for decorating each year, but the information is already old by the time it reaches the magazines.

At best, there may be some inspiration in a new trend or help kick us out of our complacent work habits.

I'm always leery of putting too much faith in an unproven path because my living depends on having a product for the majority of the folks that buy pottery

I think if we had information on how often people redecorate their living spaces and you they follow for decorating advice, that might help evaluating new ceramic trends

Wyndham



#24 Mudslinger Ceramics

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:29 PM

Much of that looks like a subtle cross of a 3rd graders art project and dog poo.

 

Absolutely!    

 

I think I might have liked 2 ??.....maybe.....


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#25 Benzine

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:50 PM

Colby, good point on the source.

Despite the publication's reputability, when it comes to ceramics, I think this thread has led to some good discussions. Some of those same discussions were started in the Soldner topic as well.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#26 CLN studios

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 10:59 PM

Truly am sorry for sounding a bit condescending  Stellaria. My only point was that crafts like this only survive as long as the next generation has interest in it. Sure things might be beautiful and great craftsmanship but that doesnt mean it grabs their interest. Things like drawing, graffitit, painting, etc...  will always stay relevant because they have easy access to them  compared to kilns and clay. The perception of beauty has changed to them, its not classical forms or craftsman ship but unique, grunge-ish, and  slightly gore-ish  (even rebellious in nature such as those pieces that looked like they were smashed and destroyed) 

 
 


#27 Stellaria

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 11:14 PM

So long as there are people who love the simplicity if solid workmanship and are interested in the history of it, there will always be somebody who wants to learn it. Trendy fly-by-night experimentalists will come and go with little lasting impact, as they have in the past and will continue to do. Plus, we now have the field of experimental archaeology to add to it - not only do we have current traditions and knowledge to keep moving forward with, but an active research community working backwards to figure out the practicalities of how things were BEFORE and underlying the traditions we have.

I apologize if I sounded harsh. I'm quite aware that my tastes in pottery are quite narrow and low on originality and artsiness, so I'm sure that prejudice bled through heavily.

But seriously - I did see a vase on etsy that the "artist" was trying to sell for a stupid amount of money that looked like a kindergartener's interpretation of a pile of rainbow poo covered in donut glaze. The listing was chock full of glorification of the rarity of the tinted clays used, etc. IMO, it doesn't matter how much work goes into it, who made it, or what rare materials are used - ugly pots is ugly pots, and if a big name guy can get thousands for a stepped-on pinch pot with a face on it, the third-grader down the street's work should be worth the same. The fact that it's not says that something is amiss.

(I am of the grunge/graffiti/all must be unique generation, so I do seriously reject the notion that those trends are universal and engulfing. The traditions will survive the trends. No question.)

#28 CLN studios

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 11:17 PM

Oh yes. ugly is ugly and there is nothing you can do about that  ;)    this sounds a bit ugly but things like ugly vases on etsy arent even relevant  til they hit list like this  :P



#29 Stellaria

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 11:18 PM

That's the thing, though. Much of that list was certainly on par!

#30 Wyndham

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 12:02 PM

The  face jugs in the article were of a different style than what the potters of NC & SC make.

Traditional face jugs are ash glazed using fired cones for the teeth and porcelain shards for eyes.

Now if we look at the cultural history of the face jug, we find it's use as a way to keep the social group, morally aware of the consequences of doing evil to one another.

When a person died, a face jug was placed on the grave. If the person were a good person in the community, the face jug would remain intact for a year, then broken to let the soul rise to heaven.

If they were evil in the sight of the group, the jug was broken before the year was up and this condemned their soul to hell.

Folk potters, trying to get a leg up on the competition, decorated the whiskey jugs in distorted faces to attract more jug sales.

Contemporary potters saw that the older pieces were being collected as art, so they began making their own collectible versions and so on....

Most collector in this area, want the traditional style ash glazed face jugs.I doubt if the ones featured in Artnews would sell here but if this were to be a worthy trend, I'm sure some potters here would take note.

As in the "Garlic Plate" thread, if people want them, we'll make them.

The question becomes,what  percentage of ourselves are we, potters for ourselves or potters for the marketplace.

Wyndham



#31 Pugaboo

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:51 PM

Kind of off topic but since I mentioned it here earlier. I juried in to that gallery I was stressing about! We shall see if sales follow the prestige it has in the area.

On another note it has the Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia as part of their complex and they have some of the Old Face Jugs and such. The old ones are different than the modern ones I think it's the glaze they used like you mentioned. I personally don't care for them but a lot of potters make their own versions around here and people seem to eat them up. I don't think I qualify as a folk potter my work isn't folksy enough, it's not completely traditional either, nor is it abstract... Gee I got no idea what style of pottery I do!

I'm just glad I have another venue to try and sell my pottery in. This gallery makes #4 in the area, #5 I am working on. Slowly but surely I am getting places I don't have to be at personally in order to make a sale. I am up to 6 festivals in the area for the year as well. The goal is 10 different galleries/shops to carry my work and to do up to 12 festivals a year. These are all small local places and I don't expect to sell a million at any of the places but a trickle becomes a flood and that adds up to real money.

Terry
I have attached images of 3 of the pieces I submitted. The 4th I don't have a picture of on my iPad.

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#32 Babs

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 10:08 PM

Just wondering about the semantics of trend and trendy



#33 Min

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 12:02 AM

Kind of off topic but since I mentioned it here earlier. I juried in to that gallery I was stressing about! We shall see if sales follow the prestige it has in the area.

 

Congrats Terry! That's awesome! It's nice to see your hard work is being recognized.   :)



#34 Pugaboo

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 07:44 AM

Min - thanks!
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#35 Wyndham

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 08:54 AM


 

Just wondering about the semantics of trend and trendy

 

My own perception of trendy  has a negative connotation or something with out substance. Hollywood/California trendy is a warning on my radar.

Trend on the other hand seems to be used by more thoughtful writers with discussions on more weighty matters.

 

In general, art never seems to get attention unless something absurd happens such as extreme high price or destruction art.

Wyndham



#36 JBaymore

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:04 PM

Sergei Isopov is a very successful artist with great craftsmanship and a really good speaker.

 

He will be doing a lecture at our college this fall.

 

Regarding the apparent "Appropriate  Path" in ceramics that some seem to hold dear here ......... "Not all that wander are lost".

 

best,

 

......................john


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#37 JBaymore

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:08 PM

............, but please, please, please read and think critically!

 

Amen.

 

best,

 

.....................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#38 JBaymore

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 01:35 PM

He wanted them to think. Not all aesthetic prose are pseudo intellectual.

 

Another 'amen' is due right there.  

 

The very CORE of our college department's ceramics curriculum is to get students to THINK.  We stress a heavily traditional route to develop that thinking...... but developing an understanding of their own work and how that "fits into the world" is very important.  It you want to go off and be "irreverant" and "non-traditional" then you better then be able to eloquently articulate the reasoning and route that lead you to that point. If you want to make "highly traditional work", you better be able to support that approach with the same level of analysis and impact.  You can work sculpturally, you can work functionally... but you can't work without actively THINKING.

 

BTW... I basically "ban" the oh-so-easy words "I like" from critiques.  I don't really care if a student likes or dislikes a particular work.  I want to know things like what the student actually sees in the piece being considered (ande hence what they may be missing), I want to know how the visual elements and principles of design are handled, I want to know what specicic feelings the work might produce (deeper than the usless "like" comment), if it is functional...... how has function been adressed and is it successful to those ends, I want to know what choices were made in the forming and decorating processes and why those particular choices were made, I want to know what historical references might have been researched to arrive at the work, and so on.

 

Anti-intellectualism is a trend itself here in the USA of late. Terribly sad.

 

I would strongly suggest that those that are having serious difficulty with this particular article..... go get a couple of books on ceramic art history and read up.

 

best,

 

........................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#39 Wyndham

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 04:16 PM

 John, I feel that I need to defend my position on the article in question.


 

Anti-intellectualism is a trend itself here in the USA of late. Terribly sad.

 

I would strongly suggest that those that are having serious difficulty with this particular article..... go get a couple of books on ceramic art history and read up.

 

best,

 

........................john

 

I have studied art history in general  through out my life and  delved into ceramic history, the 28 years of being a potter.

Though some of the pieces in the article were technically well done, most gave me, the impression of sloppy work.

As i make a living from the pottery I produce, I have learned what people expect when paying for a handmade product.

 

There has to be critical thinking in determining whether something is groundbreaking or "The emperor's new Clothes".

 

I may have a narrow POV about who sets the trends in fashion and art. If it is the Hollywood red carpet crowd or others of that ilk , that sets the taste for art, fashion, politics and morality, that is unacceptable in my value system.

 

This is not anti-intellectualism, on the contrary, intellectual discourse is the meat of enlightenment, it's the critical evaluation of society that allows a society to flourish.

 

 

 

BTW... I basically "ban" the oh-so-easy words "I like" from critiques.  I don't really care if a student likes or dislikes a particular work.  I want to know things like what the student actually sees in the piece being considered (ande hence what they may be missing), I want to know how the visual elements and principles of design are handled, I want to know what specicic feelings the work might produce (deeper than the usless "like" comment), if it is functional...... how has function been adressed and is it successful to those ends, I want to know what choices were made in the forming and decorating processes and why those particular choices were made, I want to know what historical references might have been researched to arrive at the work, and so on.

 

I agree whole heartily.

What you have set as a critical examination is a lone candle in the night.

 

You may have seen something different in the photo's in the article than I, if so , fine.

If your standards were put in place for the ceramics in the article,what would you have said?

 

Wyndham



#40 Babs

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 09:10 PM

 

Sergei Isopov is a very successful artist with great craftsmanship and a really good speaker.

 

He will be doing a lecture at our college this fall.

 

Regarding the apparent "Appropriate  Path" in ceramics that some seem to hold dear here ......... "Not all that wander are lost".

 

best,

 

......................john

 

Yes John,

Voice from the wilderness here, to misquote, "Not all that are lost wander"

Threre is a difficulty I experience when presented by one piece of an artist's work, and ignorance of the artist. I can appreciate the work more exquisitely if I see it in context,or in a well curated exhibition.

No idea if it's a trend or trendy unless I get a deeper picture, don't need to like it to appreciate it.

The like /dislike is a superficial instant reaction which I think takes place before the self takes in what the reactive eye is seeing.

For example, I have mistaken a large coil of sisal as my dog! Even chastised it for being inside the shed on such a fine day!

Then when i actually saw what was there, I picked it up and put it on a shelf, just incase I was fooled again!

Then wnet to kick the dog! :)






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