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Marcia Selsor

What Would Your Ideal Workshop Be? Topic , Teacher, Location?

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Hi, A space with a window with a view of mountains & larger than my basement & garage spaces. Guess I'll just settle for what I have now as the other is not likely to happen. I need to store the views from travel. Manitoba is flat at least the part I live in.

Joy

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take one of those vacation photos to an enlarger who will make a mural for your wall.

 

I remember working in the basement in Virginia.  on hot, humid days the fan would cause the moisture on the pipes overhead to rain all over the studio.  those hot, humid days were happening for 3 months of the year.

 

workshop dream?  ellen curran at her studio for 2 weeks.

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You guys- Marcia doesn't mean workshop space as in studio. She means a "workshop ", presented by one of the greats like Val Cushing, Bill Daly. Walter Ostrom,Tom Spleth, Linda Christianson, Doug Fitch, Shoji Hamada,Michael Cardew.

TJR.

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I live in an apartment and am trying to find a way to cram everything in with equipment i'm buying. I know it can get messy so I literalyl have no idea what i'm gonna do. Wish some people had some sample pictures of their small at home studios.

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I live in an apartment and am trying to find a way to cram everything in with equipment i'm buying. I know it can get messy so I literalyl have no idea what i'm gonna do. Wish some people had some sample pictures of their small at home studios.

She is not talking studio. She is asking about a workshop presenter.

TJR.

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I live in an apartment and am trying to find a way to cram everything in with equipment i'm buying. I know it can get messy so I literalyl have no idea what i'm gonna do. Wish some people had some sample pictures of their small at home studios.

She is not talking studio. She is asking about a workshop presenter.

TJR.

 

Oh! So she wants a workshop on studio organization! My apologies.

Tom.

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Leach, in addition to what TJR said.  But less a workshop and more just mopping the floor and watching.  I'm not much for the workshop environment.

Which brings up a question that should be a question of the week ....

 

Why don't male potters attend workshops?

 

I think it has some connection to their aversion for asking for any kind of directions! How do you learn new techniques?

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Ideal workshop?:

  • Taught by Jason Briggs, Sandra Blain, & Steven Hill
  • Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains
  • Preferably just out of cell phone range
  • Probably 7-10 days long
  • Good food, fine (or reasonably fine) wine, and time for fun conversation around the dinner table
  • Something under $100 per day, all inclusive
  • Nearby trout fishing (optional)
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Leach, in addition to what TJR said.  But less a workshop and more just mopping the floor and watching.  I'm not much for the workshop environment.

Which brings up a question that should be a question of the week ....

 

Why don't male potters attend workshops?

 

I think it has some connection to their aversion for asking for any kind of directions! How do you learn new techniques?

 

The past two weekends, I attended workshops with Lana Wilson, followed by Tony Clennell. (And, I even asked Tony if his future workshops would include colored porcelain.) There were a couple males in the Lana Wilson workshop; more in the Tony Clennell.

 

I am willing to venture that, with respect to hobby potters/non-professionals (probably the vast majority of those looking at this forum), there are far more female potters than males. So, it would follow that more females would attend a workshop than males. I would also guess that the type/content/focus of the workshop influences who attends.

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Leach, in addition to what TJR said.  But less a workshop and more just mopping the floor and watching.  I'm not much for the workshop environment.

Which brings up a question that should be a question of the week ....

 

Why don't male potters attend workshops?

 

I think it has some connection to their aversion for asking for any kind of directions! How do you learn new techniques?

 

 

I have no problem asking direct questions--I think the nature of my presence on the forum has shown that.  

 

My real issue with workshops is the pace.  All classroom type environments need to be paced such that the slowest learner in the room can keep up.  There's nothing wrong with this.  Anything else would be bad teaching, but I get frustrated when I can't go at my pace.  It's not enjoyable for me otherwise.  So I'm more than happy to experiment on my own and learn new techniques that way.

 

I think a lot of guys are the same way.  They want/need to learn at their own pace and independently.  Ego likely plays a part too, but most guys I know would rather just take their car apart than learn how to take a car apart in a class.

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Leach, in addition to what TJR said.  But less a workshop and more just mopping the floor and watching.  I'm not much for the workshop environment.

Which brings up a question that should be a question of the week ....

 

Why don't male potters attend workshops?

 

I think it has some connection to their aversion for asking for any kind of directions! How do you learn new techniques?

 

 

I have no problem asking direct questions--I think the nature of my presence on the forum has shown that.  

 

My real issue with workshops is the pace.  All classroom type environments need to be paced such that the slowest learner in the room can keep up.  There's nothing wrong with this.  Anything else would be bad teaching, but I get frustrated when I can't go at my pace.  It's not enjoyable for me otherwise.  So I'm more than happy to experiment on my own and learn new techniques that way.

 

I think a lot of guys are the same way.  They want/need to learn at their own pace and independently.  Ego likely plays a part too, but most guys I know would rather just take their car apart than learn how to take a car apart in a class.

 

 

I agree with you about the pace of most watch only demo type workshops but it's totally understandable. What drives me crazy is watching everyone dutifully making drawings and step by step notes so they can attempt to copy the pot being demoed. I much prefer hands on workshops where the participants can learn or refine technique and create a pot / sculpture that is in their own style. 

 

If I learn one thing at a workshop then I figure it was worthwhile. It is usually an off hand comment made by the presenter that I hadn't come across before that sticks with me.

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Paul , don't you have plans to go to Arrowmont soon?  Don't think that will be $100/day, though.

Absolutely...counting the days and really looking forward to my first time at Arrowmont :)

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Ooh an ideal workshop?  I have so much to learn I would like several.

 

1- sitting on a wheel next to a master on his/her wheel going through throwing basics. I feel like I can throw good, but when I hear about the Japanese training (not allowing one on a wheel for several years) It assures me that there are more likely basic things i need to improve on.  

 

2- Hands on glaze basics class with LOTS of examples of correct and incorrect combinations. 

 

3- Hands on learning a variety of specific forms 

 

 

All of them with Master potters taking about their beginnings and telling stories, in a cushy screened In 3 season room with views  with coffee/snacks,  of course not too far from my house for a very low price (everything I want to go is too expensive to fly to)   :D  I would much rather they be in studio relaxed settings VS classroom settings.  I want to get dirty and create not think of how stiff the presenter is.  I have seen videos of very good techniques but the demonstrators seem to try to intellectualize the whole thing, this is expressive art, give me some life and feeling! ;)   

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A workshop with the opportunity to try different firing.  Reduction, wood-fired, salt, pit, barrel.  Everything you can't do in an electric kiln in a community centre.

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