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Throwing Straight Out Of The Pugger-Yes


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#1 Mark C.

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 03:01 PM

Ok after many months using my peter pugger (V30) vacuum model

I started using my wet porcelain scraps thru it 

I threw some 5#-6# 8# bowls straight out of the machine last week

They threw great-had legs and was not at all what I recall from the olden days with my alpine vertical pugger(no legs )

I threw them side ways in direction of the pugged slugs.

as well as a few pugs straight up to see if there will be cracking.

Those bowls are getting glazed on Monday and I'll let you know if cracks occure

I was amazed as how well these clay threw.

I'm slowy getting convinced this pugger is a wonder machine

I had been using it only on scrap from the slab roller.

Mark


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#2 Mark369

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 05:33 PM

I throw right out of the pugger. It is de-aired. and I pay no attention to packing spin. Have been reclaming commercial clays that dryed out over several years.


Everything tastes better with cat hair in it !

 

Curiosity may have killed the cat, but it died knowing something! :wacko:


#3 Wyndham

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 11:40 AM

It's worth getting use to, like going from a kick wheel to electric. Now if I could only find the recipe for self centering clay :)

Wyndham



#4 ChenowethArts

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 11:56 AM

It's worth getting use to, like going from a kick wheel to electric. Now if I could only find the recipe for self centering clay :)

Wyndham

 

That self centering clay recipe comes from Armstrong...*pah-dum, ching*

 

Sorry, best/worst I could do,

-Paul


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#5 oldlady

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 11:58 AM

OOOOHHH!  PAUL.......................


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#6 Benzine

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 12:37 PM

Amaco has you covered on the self-centering clay Wyndham.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#7 Armen Enikolopov

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 02:43 PM

Mark,

  What do you mean when you say they had legs?

They threw great-had legs and was not at all what I recall from the olden days with my alpine vertical pugger(no legs )



#8 Mark C.

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 04:05 PM

Legs are what us potters call clay that can pull a cylinder up well with. Many tmes reclaimed porcelain will not throw well  (meaning it can only be made into small forms) if it has legs it can throw into large and taller forms.

Scrap reclaim porcelain traditionally has poor legs.

Mark


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#9 Armen Enikolopov

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 04:13 PM

Legs are what us potters call clay that can pull a cylinder up well with. Many tmes reclaimed porcelain will not throw well  (meaning it can only be made into small forms) if it has legs it can throw into large and taller forms.

Scrap reclaim porcelain traditionally has poor legs.

Mark

Ah. I hadn't ever heard the expression. Thanks. 



#10 KateMcCoy

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 07:35 PM

I had only ever heard "legs" in reference to wine - learn something new eh!



#11 Mark C.

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 02:56 PM

Well the news on the bowls I threw out of the pugger are zero cracks S or other wise

Here they are-

also Babs the toasty orange pot there  on right is a french butterfish 

Mark

Attached Files


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#12 Babs

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:38 PM

Thanks Mark, love your free glazing!.

Compression compression compression, et voila, nae S cracks!



#13 Mark C.

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Posted 02 December 2014 - 09:42 PM

Well after almost a year with this new to me machine the jury results are in.
I love it-works well and has been a joy. The vacuum keeps the air out of clay.
I use it to reclaim all wet clay (still do not reclaim dry porcelain scraps)
I mixed two new stoneware bodies for a fellow potter (500#s) who is in her 80's and it worked great.
Those bodies where Danish white with sand and without sand. She likes this mix and I mixed it and boxed it and will drop it off when I return froma a show.
So far the clay has thrown well and and my slab body has had zero issues.
I would suggest to all who are thinking about a peter pugger to at least get the V20 size as another potter I know has the smallest size and as it only holds 25#s its to small he says. The other point is you never get 25# out of it as some stays behind-the next model up is just a few hundred more dollars anyway.
These machines are expensive but I will say they make hard clat soft or blend bodies well and you can reuse scraps easy.If you are a hobbist I cannot see much value for one as clay is cheap but if you plan a lifetime of work with clay they make sense or if a used one comes along the same is true.
Its now just like another used and needed tool for me.My pocelain body will eat up the casing some over time but I do not care as I'm not going to outlive this thing.
Mark
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#14 Frankiegirl

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Posted 07 December 2014 - 07:59 AM

I saw a very clever handmade tool for doing this. It was a wood frame with wires stretched across at intervals. When you press it down over a pugged "sausage" it would cut a pre-measured set of weights, all ready to throw. You can have a bunch made up into various sizes for fast ball making.






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