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Why Porcelain?

porcelain

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#21 David F.

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 08:10 PM

Mark C. and Neil E. what porcelain would you recommend for cone 6. The local supply enter usually has some Laguna and Standard Clays. I know they have Tom Coleman's cone 10, but would like to stay at cone 6.


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#22 grype

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 10:24 AM

So I know this is a pretty old thread, but I have recently switched to throwing porcelain, and I thought I would chime in here (I was looking through old porcelain threads for knowledge). I am a newbie potter, only about 8 months under my belt. I was throwing different types of stoneware, tried about 6 types and I was pretty impressed with little loafers and thought I would never change. However, one day my supplier was out of little loafers, so I decided to just try some porcelain for kicks after hearing how hard it was to work with. To my surprise, after trying some porcelains I am pretty confident I won't go back to stoneware.

 

I can't believe how beautiful it is to throw. I have tried 3 different porcelains: Helios, 365, and P5. By far my favorite is P5. It throws well, holds it's shape wonderfully, and just does what I want it to do on the wheel. I think I had a slight advantage as that I watched Hsinchuen Lin to learn how to throw and his method of constantly using the slip on your hands instead of water let me take to porcelain pretty well. I never threw really wet on stoneware either.

 

The glazes come out so beautiful, I love white glazes and semi transparent glazes, and I just love how much more glossy the pots are. I also love the sound of porcelain. The ding of the pot is just fantastic! 

 

I have threw some of my biggest forms with porcelain. Every time I tried the same thing with stoneware I never succeeded. I was so nervous when first bought the porcelain because of all the warnings that it is so difficult to work with. I haven't had a single crack or anything so far, of course I have only fired 2 loads. But I have a bunch of stuff sitting on shelves waiting to be fired and no cracks or problems with it. I think a lot of it is just compression with ribs in the throwing stage and in the trimming stage(I trim everything). I hope I am not just lucky and I keep having good success with it.

 

So I just wanted to chime in here and say, give porcelain a try. I know I love it now. ADDICTED! I



#23 Mark C.

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 11:38 AM

Mark C. and Neil E. what porcelain would you recommend for cone 6. The local supply enter usually has some Laguna and Standard Clays. I know they have Tom Coleman's cone 10, but would like to stay at cone 6.


I do not work in cone 6 so I have zero suggestions.
I throw Daves Porcelain from laguna clay company as well as a little Babu and am trying some 550 porcealian as well.All are cone 10 bodies.
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#24 oldlady

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 03:07 PM

great news!  porcelain is not hard to work with, just use a damp sponge to throw with and you should have no problems.  even walls are more critical and heavy pots are just ready for more trimming.   good for you!


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#25 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 11:05 PM

Good work Grype! I work with ^6 Frost from Laguna for glazing. For Orbs in alternative firing I love Coleman Porcelain.
I loved working with stoneware but I don't have a reduction kiln anymore. So I work with porcelain and cone 6 Frost when I want to do functional work. For my bigger smooth burnished shapes I go to the Coleman.

#26 Crusty

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Posted 12 December 2014 - 06:47 AM

we have 2 Porcelain bodies- Standard 213 and Grellog 365 - the 365 is awesome and has made me a better potter.. It has made me learn how to make better rims on bowls etc. not to mention the pots just feel better in hand as I can get them a little thinner than any other body I have worked with so far..


I like to throw red clay, it balls nicely and hurts like hell when it hits you...


#27 Humboldt Potter

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Posted 14 December 2014 - 11:50 PM

I have switched exclusively to porcelain. Cone 10. I love the whiteness of it. I love throwing with it. Much of my work is sgraffito. Black designs on a white background, sometimes the reverse. But I also love the brightness of colored glazes on a porcelain body. So clear and bright. No grayness.
I encourage intermediate potters to try throwing with porcelain. I believe that the reason it seems so daunting, is that beginning throwers tend to work very slowly, and to use a lot of water - both of which make porcelain harder to throw. Once they learn to work with purpose, to bring clay up quickly, to be more efficient in their movements, they usually find that porcelain is no more difficult to throw than stoneware.

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#28 Crusty

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 04:24 PM

Carl, get a 4# sample of Grellog.. make slip out of it and dip your bisque ware half way in it ..  that will give you something to compare to.. we just did that to some moon white to get better color, it was just a test to see what we could get, it is just like using the body itself.. great color results .. 


I like to throw red clay, it balls nicely and hurts like hell when it hits you...


#29 JamieAlonzo

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 08:11 PM

Good work Grype! I work with ^6 Frost from Laguna for lazing. For Orbs in alternative firing I love Coleman Porcelain.
I loved working with stoneware but I don't have a reduction kiln anymore. So I work with porcelain and cone 6 Frost when I want to do functional work. For my bigger smooth burnished shapes I go to the Coleman.

 

Marcia,

 

My first attempt with procelain was with Laguna's Frost ^6 body. Do you still use it and have you ever encountered black, fine to coarse grained particles (1/16" chunks) randomly distributed throughout a bag. I have 125 lbs of this body I am reluctant to complete anything with it because of the crud. I love throwing with it. I have yet to glaze/paint it. I can send you some pictures if you want.



#30 JLowes

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 08:31 PM

I take a Summer course in alternative firing and really like Coleman Porcelain for work that will be soda fired.  You do have to cover it up as I find it grays out and looks dull without something on it.  There is a local group studio near Atlanta that fires Coleman Porcelain to Cone 6, electric and gas.  I never used the Coleman Porcelain for that cone, but I didn't hear any complaints when I asked about it at Cone 6.  I preferred Standard 365 for Cone 6, so that was my go to.

 

I do insist on porcelain with grolleg rather than the US domestic porcelain. I feel that it has a translucent, luminous, quality that domestic porcelain lacks, even at Cone 6. I have recently purchased a couple of bags of porcelain that has a New Zealand clay in it that is supposed to yield translucency at Cone 5/6, but I have not made anything with it to fire yet.  It came clear across the US from Washington State to Georgia, so it may not be a regular in my studio, although USPS fixed rate packaging kept the cost down (although the clay and boxes had been through a lot it appeared.

 

I did steer clear of porcelain for quite a time before I tried it, hearing and thinking it was difficult.  Once I tried it, I did not find it so, but by then I had increased my throwing skills.

 

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#31 Biglou13

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Posted 15 December 2014 - 10:36 PM

1. Because people think it's cool. (Just discovered this at recent show). I found it adds a elitist quality to your work. Place teeth together now say porcelain ( only partially joking).

2. I'm making variations of the galloway/ cushing cone 6 recipe. And it's a treat to work with. Pretty dang white . And inexpensive to make. I've used helios at lower temp range, nice and white but pricy clay, and under fired at cone 6/7. Standard recipe is close to helios

3. I think colors pop better in pocelain/ porcelain(ish) clays

4. Note cone 6 porcelain and cone 10 porcelain or higher are different , but my version of recipe the clay is much more glassy feeling and sounding than any other stone ware I've used.

5. Current body is transparent where thin. And prolly more so on latest mix since I subbed grolleg for tile 6. And a veegum for bentonite. This batch should be as white as helios I hope.

6. Contrary to popular belief. I like its feel on the wheel better than any stoneware I've thrown. The is more compliant to my will and vision.

7. My work area looks cleaner with white clay.
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#32 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 December 2014 - 08:43 AM

Good work Grype! I work with ^6 Frost from Laguna for lazing. For Orbs in alternative firing I love Coleman Porcelain.
I loved working with stoneware but I don't have a reduction kiln anymore. So I work with porcelain and cone 6 Frost when I want to do functional work. For my bigger smooth burnished shapes I go to the Coleman.

 
Marcia,
 
My first attempt with procelain was with Laguna's Frost ^6 body. Do you still use it and have you ever encountered black, fine to coarse grained particles (1/16" chunks) randomly distributed throughout a bag. I have 125 lbs of this body I am reluctant to complete anything with it because of the crud. I love throwing with it. I have yet to glaze/paint it. I can send you some pictures if you want.


I did find some crud but not lately. The last order I picked up in San Antonio was fantastic. I even asked the laguna folks at NCEA if they had changed the recipe. Maybe it was fresh.

Marcia

#33 oldlady

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Posted 17 December 2014 - 11:49 AM

tom coleman developed two recipes for porcelain.  one of them is the one he uses at cone 10 and the other is called "Elaine's Porcelain" and was developed for cone 6.  aardvark makes his personal stuff.  he says they were the only people who actually made sure a 50 pound bag had 50 pounds of the ingredients to make his formula.  everyone else simply tossed a bag marked 50 pounds into the mix and reached for the next bag.  

 

elaine's work, the lovely carved pots, are made with cone 6. i believe it is available from Sheffield in massachusetts.  there are also "celadon" glazes called elaine's advertised in ceramics monthly.

 

all this info is years old, so i just checked it out on sheffield's website.  a 25 pound bag of elaine's or any other clay can be had as a sample for only $15. with the $15 applied to the first real order. 


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