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Kiln Disclosure


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#41 JBaymore

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 12:07 PM

What are some of the causes of this? Not enough amps for the 220?

 

Lots of possible causes in my experience:

 

People who think a kiln and a home clothes dryer are the same and just plug in to an existing X amp circuit.

 

Electricians that think they know better than the kiln manufacturer or the kiln installation folks and say they can save the homeowner some money by doing it THIER way.

 

Poeple who wire it themselves and know just enough to be dangerous.

 

Corrosion in connections becasue of improper installation or improper routine maintenence.  Corrosion increases resistance to eletrical flow.... resistance to flow equals heat being generated... heat being generated where is it is not expected equals disaster.

 

Installing a new kiln supply in a REALLY old panel , and not having the whole panel checked out at the same time. (The new circuit is fine.... the old main supply connection is the issue.  See corrosion.....and cobwebs.)

 

That's the basic list.  Neil....... your input?

 

best,

 

......................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#42 CPT

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 01:17 PM

So glad I came across this discussion thread:

 

We have been renting for the last 4 years, and my manual electric kiln ( for my business) has gone with me everywhere.  I even had an electrician come over and create a outlet for at as well, no problem.

 

We have recently bought a home and found out that our homeowners insurance DOES not cover the kiln at all!  We have called 2 other insurace companies and they said no, too.  If I do ceramics as a hobby, they said it would be ok.  But if it's for business purposes, no.  Maybe we can call State Farm???



#43 neilestrick

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Posted 16 October 2014 - 05:32 PM

 

What are some of the causes of this? Not enough amps for the 220?

 

Lots of possible causes in my experience:

 

People who think a kiln and a home clothes dryer are the same and just plug in to an existing X amp circuit.

 

Electricians that think they know better than the kiln manufacturer or the kiln installation folks and say they can save the homeowner some money by doing it THIER way.

 

Poeple who wire it themselves and know just enough to be dangerous.

 

Corrosion in connections becasue of improper installation or improper routine maintenence.  Corrosion increases resistance to eletrical flow.... resistance to flow equals heat being generated... heat being generated where is it is not expected equals disaster.

 

Installing a new kiln supply in a REALLY old panel , and not having the whole panel checked out at the same time. (The new circuit is fine.... the old main supply connection is the issue.  See corrosion.....and cobwebs.)

 

That's the basic list.  Neil....... your input?

 

best,

 

......................john

 

 

Yes, it could be any one of those things. People don't always understand the amperage draw issue, so I've seen people replace the plug on the kiln to match whatever 240V outlet they have in the house and plug it in. In theory it should flip the breaker, but it's possible for it to heat up quite a bit before flipping. Old, corroded connections in the panel can arc and melt things out, too. I've seen several melted breakers. In general, the big issue is that the circuit should be inspected from the start by a certified electrician, and reinspected and cleaned up every few years, especially in humid environments. The power cord-outlet connection is often a point of corrosion since people plug them in and leave them in for years at a time.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com




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