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Glaze Layering Using Different Manufactors Products

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I've been using 4 different glaze manufactors'  (Amaco, Laguna, Mayco & Spectrum). I would like to try layering different products together but unsure of the results. Has anyone done this type of glaze layering? If so, what are your results and/or recommendations? 

 

Thanks

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Make up some test tiles and try it ... worst case you would have some ugly test tiles ... best case, you could discover some wonderful combos.

Test tiles are often slanted L shapes ( / ) with a pattern on them. The pattern will show you how the glaze breaks over high spots. Google "glaze test tiles images" to get some ideas of shapes to try.

Just keep the Cone temps in mind ... if you decide to try a Cone 05 at Cone 5 to see what happens ... have a dish or grooved tile underneath to catch the glaze runs.

It will be a lot of fun for you and a great learning experience ... oh yes, don't forget to keep NOTES. Nothing worse than getting a fab result and not knowing how you did it.

Enjoy!

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Mixing manufacturers products is not a problem- the problems arise with specific glazes. Many product lines aren't even the same formula from color to color, especially in cone 5-6 glazes. Laguna's Moroccan Sand series is a good example of that. Lots of different base formulas in that series. So test, test, test every combination you can, even those that don't seem like they would work. Some of the best combos in my studio come from glazes I never would have thought to put together. You'll get some ugly ones, some great ones, and possibly some that even bubble and do all sorts of nasty things.

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Make a ton of test tiles, bisque and number them, then set up a chart to keep track of which combo is on which number.

For the chart we have at our community studio, the glaze name on the side of the chart is the base glaze, and the glaze name along the top of the chart is the glaze layered over. We leave an inch or so of the base glaze uncovered to show any movement from the layering.

It's a tedious process, and if you have a lot of glazes you'll get a lot of ugly tiles. But those few gorgeous combos you discover make the whole process worth it.

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Someone on here once said he numbered every glaze that came into his studio. Doing so allows you to keep meticulous records with less writing. You could even work out a system adding letters to identify each manufacturer and another letter for your own glazes.

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And when you mix two glazes together, you make a third glaze (duh) with its own particular properties. You can't automatically assume two "food safe" glazes mixed together will result in a third "food safe" glaze. You will only find that out by having the third/combo glaze tested for safeness, durability, and fit. If you intend to use the combos on functional pieces, it is your responsibility to make sure they are safe.

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Thank you all for your input. I will definitely try lots of test tiles with different combos knowing some will look good and some will not look so good. I will keep you posted on my findings as others might want to try this too.

 

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A quick way to do this is to make a flat slab then scribe lines across and down, making lots of boxes.  You then apply glaze "1" down one line of boxes, then glaze "2" down the next line and so on.  Then you apply the same glazes across ways.  This gives each glaze above and below every other glaze.

 

It wont show what happens if/when they run, but is a quick way to see if you get anything interesting.

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On the back side of the tlles mark your glaze combo. Use a toothpick dipped in Red iron oxide wash as a marker.  Or you can buy an old style ink well pen using the red iron oxide wash as the ink.

 

jed

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