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Can You Double A Wood Burning Oven As A Kiln?


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#21 Benzine

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 05:55 PM

[quote name="JBaymore" post="59881" timestamp="1401802821"

Yeah.... now that I've said all that.... I'm nuts. Think I'll go get a couple big L+Ls with nice computerized controllers. Sounds REALLY good to me right about now. ;)

best,

.................john[/quote]

John, they do make some great oxidation glazes, that mimic wood fire effects.......

[quote name="Mark C." post="59918" timestamp="1401826805"]I'm bisquing later in week and going to cook a few turkeys and pies in gas kiln -any suggestions on basting them so they can hold up to cone 08?
Foil wrap or should I use ceramic fiber?
I thought about the electric kiln but the drippings will stain the bricks and I'll have to sponge it off every fire with water.
I just could not help myself on this one.All in jest
Mark[/quote]

Mark, what you are going to want to do is stuff the chicken with a beer can, to help keep the meat moist up to cone 08. If you go any hotter, you need to contact TJR and get some of that Canadian beer, which will better be able to handle the higher temperatures.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#22 Mark C.

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 09:27 PM

EH?

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#23 JLowes

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 02:15 PM

You might consider doing a low fire alternate in your wood burning oven.  I have talked with a resident of the Taos Pueblo in New Mexico about how he fires his work in his horno (wood burning oven) inside his living room.  Now he is not using glazes or the like, but still gets lots of character in his pots from the "fire clouds" formed when part of the pot is reduced and part oxidized in the firings.  This looks particularly nice on micaceous clays like he uses.

 

I can imagine doing some pit fire effects as well, but then metals get introduced and toxicity becomes a problem.

 

John



#24 TJR

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 04:07 PM



John, they do make some great oxidation glazes, that mimic wood fire effects.......

[quote name="Mark C." post="59918" timestamp="1401826805"]I'm bisquing later in week and going to cook a few turkeys and pies in gas kiln -any suggestions on basting them so they can hold up to cone 08?
Foil wrap or should I use ceramic fiber?
I thought about the electric kiln but the drippings will stain the bricks and I'll have to sponge it off every fire with water.
I just could not help myself on this one.All in jest
Mark


Mark, what you are going to want to do is stuff the chicken with a beer can, to help keep the meat moist up to cone 08. If you go any hotter, you need to contact TJR and get some of that Canadian beer, which will better be able to handle the higher temperatures.

Don't bring me into this! You guys are on your own. We are polite in Canada, remember.

TJR.



#25 Min

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 04:41 PM

 

 

 



John, they do make some great oxidation glazes, that mimic wood fire effects.......

[quote name="Mark C." post="59918" timestamp="1401826805"]I'm bisquing later in week and going to cook a few turkeys and pies in gas kiln -any suggestions on basting them so they can hold up to cone 08?
Foil wrap or should I use ceramic fiber?
I thought about the electric kiln but the drippings will stain the bricks and I'll have to sponge it off every fire with water.
I just could not help myself on this one.All in jest
Mark
Mark, what you are going to want to do is stuff the chicken with a beer can, to help keep the meat moist up to cone 08. If you go any hotter, you need to contact TJR and get some of that Canadian beer, which will better be able to handle the higher temperatures.

Don't bring me into this! You guys are on your own. We are polite in Canada, remember.

TJR.

 

So what I'm taking from this is the best thing to do with American beer is put it up the back end of a chicken?   :P



#26 Benzine

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 07:03 PM

 

 

 



John, they do make some great oxidation glazes, that mimic wood fire effects.......

[quote name="Mark C." post="59918" timestamp="1401826805"]I'm bisquing later in week and going to cook a few turkeys and pies in gas kiln -any suggestions on basting them so they can hold up to cone 08?
Foil wrap or should I use ceramic fiber?
I thought about the electric kiln but the drippings will stain the bricks and I'll have to sponge it off every fire with water.
I just could not help myself on this one.All in jest
Mark

Mark, what you are going to want to do is stuff the chicken with a beer can, to help keep the meat moist up to cone 08. If you go any hotter, you need to contact TJR and get some of that Canadian beer, which will better be able to handle the higher temperatures.

Don't bring me into this! You guys are on your own. We are polite in Canada, remember.

TJR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



John, they do make some great oxidation glazes, that mimic wood fire effects.......

[quote name="Mark C." post="59918" timestamp="1401826805"]I'm bisquing later in week and going to cook a few turkeys and pies in gas kiln -any suggestions on basting them so they can hold up to cone 08?
Foil wrap or should I use ceramic fiber?
I thought about the electric kiln but the drippings will stain the bricks and I'll have to sponge it off every fire with water.
I just could not help myself on this one.All in jest
Mark
Mark, what you are going to want to do is stuff the chicken with a beer can, to help keep the meat moist up to cone 08. If you go any hotter, you need to contact TJR and get some of that Canadian beer, which will better be able to handle the higher temperatures.

Don't bring me into this! You guys are on your own. We are polite in Canada, remember.

TJR.

 

Very polite, unless of course someone at an Art Show asks if you have a certain item, a bit bigger, smaller, in a different color....

 

 

So from what I'm taking from this is the best thing to do with American beer is put it up the back end of a chicken?  :P

 

 

I'm not a drinker, so as far as I'm concerned, the best thing to do with any beer, is shove it up a chicken's butt.  It's also apparently a good aging additive for clay.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#27 Karen B

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 11:21 AM

If you have some extra bricks, you can easily set up to do sawdust firing if you like decorative pottery. I did some when I was in school and again when I moved to a new residence and had no studio set up yet.  Here are a couple links to see what different people do with it.  I always liked the look from burnishing the pots first.

-  http://www.potspotsp...nd-raku-firing/

-(you can skip to about 58 seconds with this one)  






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