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Anyone Else Interested Or Know Anything About Firing Leopard Spot Shinos?

Leopard Spot Shinos Firing shinos

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#21 Plover

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 08:38 PM

Well, I did it. I took the 3 day firing workshop with Geil Kilns and Tom Coleman! and OMG!
I'm not sure this is the only way to get leopard spot shinos but based on my research, I believe it is the easiest and these guys have dialed it in and have uncovered the mysteries on how to get these little beauties.
 
As was earlier stated... glaze application is important, you want to make sure you get the glaze on thick enough,
but there was no waiting, no drying, ...we pretty much, glazed our pots and stuck them right into the kiln and lit it up.
 
At around 200-300 degrees we could open up the kiln and see the spots forming in front of our eyes.

It was amazing.
The Geil Kiln fired incredibly even top to bottom.  There were some special firing techinques, discovered by Paul Geil that we followed.
And not only did we have Shinos in the kiln we also had Copper Reds, Celadons, Teals and a Yanagihara white glaze that was reformulated to be a white micro crystal glaze that we all got to experiment with Teal and Vegas Red oversprays. 
 
I've attached a few images I took quickly as the kiln was being unloaded.

 
I'd say, It was one of the best workshop experiences I have ever had and I've been to plenty. I'd recommend this workshop to anyone looking to fire their gas kiln with better results, no matter what your preference is for glazes. 

The biggest problem was not everyone put the glaze on thick enough. 

Other than that, the results were amazing!

 

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#22 Rebel_Rocker

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 07:27 PM


So, my thoughts are, a pot wrapped in styrofoam peanuts will have areas where the styrofoam is in direct contact with the pot ("contacted areas") and other "open areas" where the styrofoam doesn't actually touch the pot's surface. As the wash or glaze dries, soda ash evaporates/migrates to pot's surface in the "open areas", but no evaporation or surface migration of soda ash occurs in the "contacted areas" (i.e., where the styrofoam touches its acting like wax resist).  Carbon trapping will occur in the open areas where there is soda ash present.  Conversely, no carbon trapping happens in the "contact areas" because there is no evaporated soda ash on the pot's surface at these touch points. 

 

-SD

 Yes but the wax resist (I have done this, rubber bands are good for straight lines :)  ) makes the soda migrate to the sides.  You don't get carbon trap where the wax is (we get pretty good orange usually with a malcom davis).

 

 I think maybe the popcorn actually sucks moisture out where it is located (maybe sponges would work too). Thus causeing the opposite effect. More carbon trap in the spots that are touching.

 

 I'll have to try this out soon, am curious now.



#23 S. Dean

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 04:35 AM

 


So, my thoughts are, a pot wrapped in styrofoam peanuts will have areas where the styrofoam is in direct contact with the pot ("contacted areas") and other "open areas" where the styrofoam doesn't actually touch the pot's surface. As the wash or glaze dries, soda ash evaporates/migrates to pot's surface in the "open areas", but no evaporation or surface migration of soda ash occurs in the "contacted areas" (i.e., where the styrofoam touches its acting like wax resist).  Carbon trapping will occur in the open areas where there is soda ash present.  Conversely, no carbon trapping happens in the "contact areas" because there is no evaporated soda ash on the pot's surface at these touch points. 

 

-SD

 Yes but the wax resist (I have done this, rubber bands are good for straight lines :)  ) makes the soda migrate to the sides.  You don't get carbon trap where the wax is (we get pretty good orange usually with a malcom davis).

 

 I think maybe the popcorn actually sucks moisture out where it is located (maybe sponges would work too). Thus causeing the opposite effect. More carbon trap in the spots that are touching.

 

 I'll have to try this out soon, am curious now.

 

 

Rebel_Rocker, I don't think that carbon trapping ia happening where the styrofoam peanuts touch the pot,  Marcia asked earlier in this topic "Why would there be non-carbon trapped dots where the pot was touching the [styrofoam] popcorn surface." (emphasis added).  This is consistent with the styrofoam acting like a resist and soda ash migrating to the surface of the pot that isn't any styrofoam in direct contact..  Moisture doesn't wick through a styrofoam cup, so I don't think glaze is being sucked up by the styrofoam peanuts.  

 

Now you could be onto something with the sponge.  If you try this, please let us know what you observe.

 

-SD



#24 ChenowethArts

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 06:10 AM

I was introduced to Malcom Davis Shino just this last semester and witnessed the results that people are describing here with the wax resist.  I noted that someone mentioned a fast-paced: glaze, apply resist and then immediately-into-the-kiln. process  We did some experimenting, comparing pots with Malcolm Davis Shino where some (after applying the glaze and the wax resist) were allowed to dry for a couple of weeks, in contrast with other pots that went directly into the kiln right after the glaze/wax treatment.  Side-by-side in the kiln, there were more dramatic effects on the pots that were allowed to air dry over a longer period.

 

Is it possible that the longer drying period allow the soda to migrate and concentrate more around the wax?

 

By the by, I have never been a great shino fan...until now,

-Paul


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#25 bciskepottery

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Posted 16 July 2014 - 08:52 PM

Is it possible that the longer drying period allow the soda to migrate and concentrate more around the wax?
-Paul


Yes, a longer drying period will see more soda migrate to the surface, perhaps even forming crystal-ladders on the outside.

I believe Malcom tried a variety of approaches to drying and getting soda to the surface: in closed boxes, packed with various items to create resists on the surface or draw out the soda, wax resist, etc.

I've seen potters ladle the soda solution from the top of the glaze bucket and soak their pot in that solution before returning it to the glaze and mixing the glaze for dipping.

It would help the discussion if we knew the glaze recipe used; also, the firing schedule: "There were some special firing techinques, discovered by Paul Geil that we followed." Just what were those "special techniques"? And, then, you get to try replicating those techniques in your own kiln.

#26 Plover

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Posted Yesterday, 08:02 PM

I appreciate the interest that my inquiry has stimulated.  And all of the feedback for experimentation.  Sorry I don't have the recipe for the glaze, it was not give to us,  but I know it is a shino glaze with extra soda.   And the information needed to experiment with our own shinos was clear, that it is the soda in the glaze applied correctly by spraying and fired in the right environment that creates the spots.  I can you tell this, We didn't wait for drying.  The pots were put directly into the kiln asap. And at around 350 degree we could see the spots forming on the pots when we opened the kiln door.  The only thing out of the ordinary firing schedule would be involving the manipulation of the soda at it's melting point, depending on the soda you use in your glaze, will determine the melting temp.  Carbon was added to help trap the soda on the surface of the glaze. The most impressive thing was the Geil Kiln fired incredibly even top to bottom and back to front so we got spots throughout the kiln. 







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