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Anyone Else Interested Or Know Anything About Firing Leopard Spot Shinos?

Leopard Spot Shinos Firing shinos

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#1 Plover

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 03:52 PM

I am a photographer and a passionate potter. Recently, I photographed some Leopard Spot Shino pots for someone and fell in love with Leopard Spot Shinos.   I'm intrigued by the organic nature, look of these pots and the process to get them.  I understand that the occurrence of these Leopard Spots can be rare and hard to get.  wanted to check to see if anyone here had anything thoughts on this too.  Is there anyone out there that is as intrigued by this process / these types of results as I am?

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#2 Marc McMillan

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:19 AM

They are very cool and remind me of a pit or saggar fired effect.



#3 oldlady

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 03:19 PM

I hope you bought one!!


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#4 Biglou13

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 04:20 AM

Yes!
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#5 Plover

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Posted 31 May 2014 - 04:59 PM

Yeah~! it kind of looks like alternative firing techinques to me too.  I've been researching how I can learn more about acheiving this look and from what I have gathered it is not only the glaze but how you fire it. 

I understand it can be elusive

but the artist I worked with said Tom Coleman and Geil Kilns has been getting consistently incredible results and he has been doing a workshop recently on the mysteries of this process.  ( I found one I posted it on the Clay events section ) I'm going to continue my research but there is not much out there I might have to take the workshop in the fall

And sadly no, I did not purchase one.  they were not for sale. 



#6 oldlady

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 05:48 PM

you will never regret taking a workshop from tom coleman.  he is the ultimate potter for me.  I am lucky enough to have gone to two of them. (attending 3 would have made me a groupie and I didn't want to do that.)

 

have met many "famous" potters and he is the most genuine human being of them all.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#7 Wyndham

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 12:54 PM

I maybe mistaken but I believe that this effect is caused by early and heavy reduction, somewhere below 1500 deg f

This is where carbon is trapped before the glaze starts to melt and creates this spotty look.

Wyndham



#8 Plover

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 02:24 AM

Wouldn't the carbon have to attach to something in the glaze to make the spots? similar to the way crystals grow, a carbon crystal?



#9 Wyndham

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 08:42 AM

Check out this link.

http://mudfireclaywo...ry-teacher.html

Wyndham



#10 Plover

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:22 PM

Wow~!~  now I have a multide of things to try with my Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze.

I love that glaze but have never been able to get spots with it. Not for lack of trying.

Thanks so much Wyndham! You've giving me alot to think about. my search continues.



#11 bciskepottery

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:39 PM

Wow~!~  now I have a multide of things to try with my Malcolm Davis Shino Glaze.
I love that glaze but have never been able to get spots with it. Not for lack of trying.
Thanks so much Wyndham! You've giving me alot to think about. my search continues.


The glaze only gets you part way there; the real key to the results is the firing schedule . . . as Wyndham alluded to. To get these types of results, you need to do the firing and learn the kiln and its temperament. Be sure to take lots of notes so you can repeat what works.

#12 Plover

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 03:03 PM

 


The glaze only gets you part way there; the real key to the results is the firing schedule . . . as Wyndham alluded to. To get these types of results, you need to do the firing and learn the kiln and its temperament. Be sure to take lots of notes so you can repeat what works.

 

Thanks for the feedback, the more I learn the more I realize it starts with the glaze but the firing is as important as the glaze, I don't understand why the spot in the kiln would matter? unless it relates to reduction or temp ... it would have to relate to one of these two yes?



#13 bciskepottery

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:33 PM

The glaze only gets you part way there; the real key to the results is the firing schedule . . . as Wyndham alluded to. To get these types of results, you need to do the firing and learn the kiln and its temperament. Be sure to take lots of notes so you can repeat what works.

Thanks for the feedback, the more I learn the more I realize it starts with the glaze but the firing is as important as the glaze, I don't understand why the spot in the kiln would matter? unless it relates to reduction or temp ... it would have to relate to one of these two yes?


If your kiln fires perfectly even . . . then spot doesn't matter. But kilns vary, even the same kiln will vary depending on density of the load, weather conditions, etc. Generally, there will be hot spots and cold spots, sweet spots and not so sweet spots, for reduction and oxidation. And some glazes prefer more reduction, other look best in oxidation. This is why fuel kiln operators will photograph each firing, both as its being loaded and after firing, to see how glazes perform, where the best spots for reduction are, etc. Another way is to put unglazed clay cookies on the shelves so you can see the flame patters and reduction/oxidation patterns. Add those photos or drawings to you kiln log. All part of getting to know your fuel-fired kiln.

#14 Plover

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:19 PM

Going to the Geil Coleman 3 day firing workshop this weekend.  ! ... we'll see how that goes...



#15 oldlady

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:10 PM

terrrriiiifffffiiiiiiccc!  

 

say hello for me.  tampa, bailey exhibit.


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#16 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 07:19 AM

I was at a wood kiln firing and someone mentioned soaking soda ash into the pot then put it in styrofoam popcorn for 2 weeks before firing. It worked. I got spots.Evidently the popcorn outgases into the surface. Can't explain anymore than that.I posted the pics in the original discussion in 2012.. It was on cone 6 reduction of Malcolm Davis Shino. Not the greatest pots or shine, but the spots did develop.

Marcia

#17 S. Dean

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Posted 03 July 2014 - 07:38 AM

I was at a wood kiln firing and someone mentioned soaking soda ash into the pot then put it in styrofoam popcorn for 2 weeks before firing. It worked. I got spots.Evidently the popcorn outgases into the surface. Can't explain anymore than that.I posted the pics in the original discussion in 2012.. It was on cone 6 reduction of Malcolm Davis Shino. Not the greatest pots or shine, but the spots did develop.

Marcia

 

Rather than outgassing from the styrofoam, it seems to me that this technique works by controlling the migration of soda ash to the pot's surface.  Where the styrofoam is touching the pot it serves to resist the soda ash.  Malcolm Davis used to decorate with brush strokes of wax resist on top of freshly glazed shino's.  There is no carbon trapping under the resisted areas.  http://ceramicartsda...alcolmDavis.jpg



#18 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 10:51 AM

I like that explanation better. This styrofoam popcorn phenomenon was discussed in Seattle but this sounds more reasonable.
Thanks for explaining that.Bur wait a minute. Why would there be non-carbon trapped dots where the pot was touching the popcorn surface. I think possibly it restricts air eating to the soda ash wash not as suggested "out basing". Maybe something like the was resist restricts air under it. Something to think about.

Marcia

#19 S. Dean

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 10:30 PM

Here's something from Robert Andrilla which talks about soda ash and carbon trapping:

 

"If you want a carbon trap shino to fire black, you need to do more than just dip it in glaze and fire it: you need to let it dry for a least a day or two first. Soda ash (sodium carbonate - Na2CO3), the glaze component that traps carbon in the glaze, is soluble in water, and so when the pot is glazed the soda ash soaks into the pot rather than remaining on the surface. As the pot and glaze slowly dries, the evaporating water carries the soda ash back to the pot's surface, where it is deposited as a fine white powder (that is easily brushed off, if you are not careful).

 

Where you see the soda ash is where the carbon will be trapped and the pot will turn gray/black; if you can control how the pot dries and when the kiln is fired, you can influence how the glaze turns out. One simple way to create contrasting orange/pale areas in the glaze is to paint wax resist over the glaze coat: the water can't evaporate from under the wax, and so the water and soda ash escape around it."

 

So, my thoughts are, a pot wrapped in styrofoam peanuts will have areas where the styrofoam is in direct contact with the pot ("contacted areas") and other "open areas" where the styrofoam doesn't actually touch the pot's surface. As the wash or glaze dries, soda ash evaporates/migrates to pot's surface in the "open areas", but no evaporation or surface migration of soda ash occurs in the "contacted areas" (i.e., where the styrofoam touches its acting like wax resist).  Carbon trapping will occur in the open areas where there is soda ash present.  Conversely, no carbon trapping happens in the "contact areas" because there is no evaporated soda ash on the pot's surface at these touch points. 

 

-SD



#20 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 08:06 AM

Thanks! So it is the way it dries/air contact.

marcia





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