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PuckGoodfellow

Home-Made Kiln Question

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Thank you for all the info and references. As for wiki.. Most colleges don't accept wiki because most of the info in there isn't accurate. Just something I was reading about the other day.

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Babs    386

Blows my "credibility closely linked to source" right out of the water!

How are you gonna get those students who know not that the Internet wasn't around when Abe walked the Earth to ever work it out!

Any ideas Benzine?

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oldlady    1,323

what about all the people who were kids and saw cartoons with cavemen and dinosaurs living together?  :)

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Do you guys realize that in one year Marty McFly should be showing up with his delorion (spelling?) Looking for his hoverboard and self lacing shoes? Forget cave men and dinosaurs. Where are our flying cars and floating houses throughout the solar system?

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Darcy Kane    28

Thank you for all the info and references. As for wiki.. Most colleges don't accept wiki because most of the info in there isn't accurate. Just something I was reading about the other day.

i taught 4th and 5th grade and I didn't accept Wiki!  Now that I teach math K-6 I accept any method a student can find or create to arrive at an answer.  

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To be fair, wikipedia is a great source if used properly. Notice the citations at the bottom of every article. There's resources like those, that can be extremely helpful for starting research. The message should be that wikipedia isn't the ultimate authority on everything, but can still be useful, IMO...

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"To be fair, wikipedia is a great source if used properly."

 

Agreed. It is a great starting point for research. Using the references at the bottom of pages is a good way to stumble upon real sources for researching a topic. But as with any media (books included), you must be critical of whether the author is speaking from documented direct/empirical experience or out his arse.

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oldlady    1,323

recently published book about glaze color has a chart with temperatures.  someone mixed up the titles and Celsius is actually FAHRENHEIT.  probably researched online somewhere.

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Benzine    610

 

Blows my "credibility closely linked to source" right out of the water!

How are you gonna get those students who know not that the Internet wasn't around when Abe walked the Earth to ever work it out!

Any ideas Benzine?

The obvious answer is that John just proved that Abraham Lincoln is a Highlander.

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CarlCravens    58

On the topic of source reliability:

 

http://www.unshelved.com/2014-6-3

 

Just because you read it in a published book doesn't mean everyone agrees that the information is correct.  Books and Wikipedia are alike... use multiple sources, cross-examine your sources.

 

(Does anybody see the irony of a discussion on a forum full of advice from strangers, talking about how unreliable Wikipedia is?)

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JBaymore    1,432

(Does anybody see the irony of a discussion on a forum full of advice from strangers, talking about how unreliable Wikipedia is?)

 

I don't see it as irony...... I made my comments as a deliberate point.  This foorum is no different than any other source.  As I constantly keep saying .... vet your sources.

 

best,

 

...............john

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