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What Do You Do To Make The Customer's Buying Experience Fun/rewarding?


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#21 TJR

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 09:28 AM

As I have said before, if people don't see an obvious use for the pot, they won't buy it. I had a BUNCH of colanders/berry bowls this last sale. They are a bowl with handles and holes in the bottom[ in a pattern], and a matching tray.

Many people asked what the bowl with holes was for. On the Sunday of the sale, I bought strawberries, washed them and had them in a dark glazed colander, and also in a white one.

The colanders sold.

TJR.



#22 Isculpt

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 09:06 PM

Thanks, everyone, for the input.



#23 clay lover

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 07:06 AM

I found some artificial bread and cheese at  big box craft store, they go on my trays along with a small knife.  I have put wooden eggs in small bowls, hard candies, candles on square trays, pretty soaps, ring of keys,  Once I set a place setting of napkin, silverware for a group of plate, sold them instantly!   I had been carrying them around for a year with no looks. 

People need help know the "WHY TO BUY" answer.



#24 PSC

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 05:52 PM

Every time i add props to my booth people want to buy my props...i found this cute little pink toy claw-footed bathtub and put my soap dishes in it to display them...everyone wanted the plastic toy tub. Currently i found these 2 great wire bowls that make great ways to display my clay pendants...every vendor comes over wanting those bowls.

Funny story...i use these unfinished wood boxes to give my display some visual interest(can be seen in my avie) so i was selling this lovely mosaiced vase and had it sitting on one box on a shelf. A lady saw it and loved the vase and waited till her hubby caught up to her as he was in the previous booth buying wood art, once he got there she expressed interest in the vase and he ho'd and hummed. Finally he said "i'll take it only if i can have the box too...it makes it look important" So i wrapped up the $140 vase and the cheap unfinished wood box and handed it to them. The next week i was back at micheals buying more wood boxes lol.

#25 Pugaboo

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 06:15 AM

Really great I ideas here! I had already been putting pencils, utensils, flowers in my items but had thought bowls and such were fairly explanatory but maybe not. I will buy some items to place in several of them and some wooden spoons for the spoon rests and such and see how that goes.

I have researched the bag situation and am getting ready to place. My first order of those. I looked around for a grocery supply store but I am in the middle of nowhere and there doesn't appear to be any so it's online ordering for me!

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#26 DirtRoads

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 11:09 AM

http://www.nashville...s/c-001155.html

I like a wider bag because it lets a lot of pieces lie flat in the bag vs on the side. The Regal (9 in wide) and Filly (7 in wide) hold most of my pieces. I did see a really nice bag in U-Line called the Carry Out (10 in wide). BUT the freight was was too much. And if you compare prices, Nashville Wraps is cheaper on the same exact size bags. I was actually astounded at the freight charges from U-Line.

Another thing I use is the Brown Craft Roll with a paper cutter. This drastically cuts down the time involved versus using (free) newpaper. If you wrap on the diagonal you don't use much. I use the 50 lb and one wrap around satisfies the customers. It looks nice. I top each bag off with some brown craft tissue and attach a little curling ribbon. I buy all supplies at Nashville Wraps. Most corporate orders expect some sort of packing. Below is my largest order (250), all dressed up and awaiting pick up.

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#27 DirtRoads

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:47 PM

^ 250 is not a "typical" order.     Two examples from yesterday's sale's:

 

1.  $30 bowl for wedding shower.  3 easy steps.  Cost:  2 ft 50lb craft 5 cents, Regal Bag 32 cents, 4 pieces of tissue 6 cents, 3 yards curling ribbon 2 cents

Total cost 45 cents (1.5% of sales value)

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#28 DirtRoads

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:51 PM

2. Phone order for 25 $6 la petite dishes for party favors $150 sale cost: Paper leopard bag 8 cents, 2 pieces tissue 3 cents total 11 cents x 25 = $2.75 1.8% of sales cost
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Final step: 2 large plastic shoppers to hold the 25 small packages (32 cents each), making final cost $3.39 - 2.2% of sales price

This customer will make a 2 hour drive next week to pick up this order. I can imagine her carrying her two shopping bags of party favors as she strolls into this party being hosted by 25 of her friends. I can NOT imagine her clutching a variety of used "Thank You" and Walmart bags, with favors stuffed in newspaper. She specifically asked for "those little leopard print bags." Overall the 2.2% is a little high for my liking. My packaging cost run about 1.6% of sales. Every package has a business card placed on the inside of the wrapping so when the gift is opened, it is the first thing they see. They know the pottery is food, oven, dishwasher and microwave safe. But more importantly, they see the location and business hours of the studio showroom. A large portion of my customers have received a Dirt Roads gift and follow up with a visit.

All supplies purchased from Nashville Wraps.

#29 Pres

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 10:55 AM

When I did shows in Central PA years ago, I was a lousy salesman. However, I was lucky in that my wife was an excellent salesperson. I would stand outside of the booth often, watching the crowd, moving in when things got busy, but often talking to customers on the side or where the talk would not interrupt traffic. My wife would often man the booth, with a friendly smile, answering questions and such until someone wanted to know more than she wanted to say, so she would introduce them to me, and I could continue on the conversation that they seemed to want to have. In the end 50/50 that they would buy. Did they feel welcome, questions answered, learn about me and pottery?  Definitely. Did I see any of them in the future? Always, and often made a sale.

 

Back then I had a stamp made with my logo, and business cards. I used the stamp on brown bags, and included business cards on sales. At the same time specialty items that people did not understand (french butter dishes) I would include a description/explanation of the pots use.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#30 Mark C.

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 10:13 AM

(specialty items that people did not understand (french butter dishes) Pres said-

 

I like to tell my customers to listen to the sea with the french butterdish held up to thier ear-You can hear the pacific with the top and the Atlantic with the bottom

 

I post a sign with the instructions over them on the display as well as each one comes with instructions inside-that said I spend way to much time talking about them as nobody reads much anymore.

Mark


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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#31 Babs

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 08:14 PM

French butter dishes?? Have you a picture of these?  Little lidded bowls?



#32 PSC

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 08:55 PM

I educated my favorite thrift store that the lidded vessel they had on the shelf was a french butter dish...if you held it up to your nose you could faintly smell the butter still. Here is one on etsy https://www.etsy.com...e-french-butter

#33 Stellaria

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 10:44 PM

Also called a butter bell.

#34 Babs

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 06:52 PM

Feel quite cultured now, So the butter is stored in the lid?? Don't answer that, does it matter which is the lid?? Just in case I have to explain the odd pot.



#35 Pugaboo

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 09:57 PM

The butter is in the lid which is basically an upside down cup. It hangs upside down into the bottom portion. You have to soften the butter a bit to fill the cup then you add a little cold water to the base. It's supposed to keep the butter fresh and spreadable.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#36 Babs

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 10:06 PM

Thank you!



#37 Stellaria

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Posted 28 May 2014 - 10:16 PM

Yep, the water in the base is supposed to seal the butter off from the air to keep it fresh and protect it from absorbing odors, while still staying soft and spreadable.
I had a little chuckle at your "feeling cultured" comment, since I work in a bakery and am opening boxes of cultured butter all day long :D

#38 clay lover

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 06:51 AM

If I worked in a bakery, I would look like the Pillsberry Dough boy !



#39 BeckyH

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 08:55 AM

We sell mainly at rennasaince fairs and science fiction conventions, with just a few street fairs, so we are more "in character" than just vending. We have lots of banter, some set pieces we trot out frequently because they make folks laugh, plenty of jokey set-ups we can use to engage. Given that we are a secondary reason the customers see us-they come for the fair experience, not to buy crafts- we aren't shy about calling out to wandering people " no need to wander past! There's plenty of pottery to fondle over here!" It really helps that there are usually two of us, so if a customer wants to chat, we can keep up other visitors.
I am working on getting us to use better packaging, but it's slow going.

#40 Babs

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 08:24 PM

Yep, the water in the base is supposed to seal the butter off from the air to keep it fresh and protect it from absorbing odors, while still staying soft and spreadable.
I had a little chuckle at your "feeling cultured" comment, since I work in a bakery and am opening boxes of cultured butter all day long :D

cultured butter  next new thing for Babs What is that?

Gonna be one educated puppy here 






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