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Terra Sig Useful Life Expectancy


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#1 Dwight

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:46 PM

Hi,

 

We are relatively new to making and using terra sig for our pit fired ware.  We are curious to know how long a batch remains "good".  We have not dried down the sig, as others suggest, but have kept it (two different batches) in sealed, covered containers.  The older batch is about 4 yrs. old,  the other is about 2.5 yrs. old.  The newer batch has settled into two layers: a water clear upper layer and a bottom silty layer, while the older batch's top layer is less clear, but the bottom layer is similar to the first.  I don't know the S.G. of either batch, but when fresh, it was approx. 1.15.

 

Are we better off making new sig or might we use what we have?

 

Any insight, comments, and or suggestions are greatly appreciated.

 

Regards,

 

Dwight



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:48 AM

years.If it dries out, add water until you get a good consistency. I have some from 2002. I have made more recently, but I can use the old if I need to.If you separated the batch from the heavy stuff previously, just shake it up and use it.


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#3 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 09:39 AM

Do you burnish the terra sig as well or just the base pot? I am thinking about doing a pit fire this summer and gathering information


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#4 Up in Smoke Pottery

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 07:44 PM

I keep adding the new sigg to the old as I make more, so there is at least some part of the sigg that is 7 years old.  If it ever gets too thick, thin with water.

 

 Rebekah  I only polish the sigg after application to the pot.  I use ribs to get very smooth sides, but do not burnish the pot.


Chad

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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 08:30 PM

I burnish is a soft sponge of foam after applying to dry pot.Rub it to a sheen. I agree with Chad. I add to old. Some is from 2002.
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#6 ChenowethArts

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:08 AM

I made a couple batches of terra sig back in 2001 using Red Art and Ball clays.  Shaking those gallon jugs prior to application still yields good results.  Getting ultra-fine terra sig may seem like a lot of trouble, but I susbscribe to the process described by Vince Pitelka.

-Paul


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#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 07:05 AM

I have used Kenny's system requiring a ball mill. I have used Charlie Riggs system for workshops where there was no ball mill. Most recently I learned a system at La Meridiana using a plastic bottle. Punching a hole above the heavy sentiment line and collecting the finer liquid as it squirts out the bottle. It works really well for terr sig.
and is fast.

Marcia




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