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Trimming Issues


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#21 clay lover

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 01:44 PM

I want to make pots, not chucks.  I am happy to use a Giffen Grip, it keeps the rims of my pots smooth like I threw them and aids in making more pots.  I don't see it as a crutch, anymore that plugging in the wheel rather than using a kick wheel.  To each his, or in this case, her, own. :-)

 

Why not check the bottom depth closely before raising the walls and then trim the outside when you finish throwing ?  It would not give you a foot ring, but would take care of bottom weight and I don't usually see fr's on bottles.



#22 Brian Stein

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 06:31 PM

I made a chuck for my griffin grip out of plumbing parts, PVC pipe, flange, rubber seal and foam seat ring. It works really well for my chalice stems, and would do the same for bottles. And not griffins are not evil, and every tool has a place, as the griffin does for me.

 

Hey Pres, could I bug you for a photo of that PVC chuck for griffin grip?



#23 Babs

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 07:06 PM

Similar to Pres and Marcia, But I use firm plastic plantpots with a ring of cloth and sponge to soften where the pot meets the "chuck" ,  large no. of pots, use this within the Giffen grip.



#24 PSC

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 10:16 PM

When i throw a chuck i make it thick then i put wet strips of newspaper on the chuck rim, and place the pot on the newspaper covered chuck. After trimming the pot i remove the paper and throw a pot out of the thrown chuck.

Also you can make a flared(think of the shape of three mile island neclear towers) thick walled bottomless cylinder as a chuck, bisque and permenantly center mount it to a bat ...i keep saying i am going to do this but never get around to it.

#25 Pres

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 10:28 PM

 

I made a chuck for my griffin grip out of plumbing parts, PVC pipe, flange, rubber seal and foam seat ring. It works really well for my chalice stems, and would do the same for bottles. And not griffins are not evil, and every tool has a place, as the griffin does for me.

 

Hey Pres, could I bug you for a photo of that PVC chuck for griffin grip?

 

I have included a couple of pics of the chuck on the wheel. I did not have any stems to trim of late so you can't see that yet. However, for those of you that use the GG I think it explains itself. I find that it works better for me using the base pads to hold it in place rather than longer stems and pillows. The parts are simple, flange, Pipe head donut, and a soft rubber seal. The pipe I saw using a cutoff to keep it square resting on the GG top with the flange around it. There is not glue, so you could take it apart and put different lengths of pipe in. This is all 3" pipe. I hope you can understand how it is used, and it probably would work for bottles, candle holders, and other long stemmed objects. As I throw off the hump and don't always get an even cut, this allows me to even up the base with a hack saw blade held perpendicular to the base of the stem pressing evenly across, in a matter of seconds it will even out the base.

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#26 clay lover

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 07:35 AM

Very cool.  I love when people think outside the box.  Often, when I'm trying to get some weird thingy invented, I wander through Lowe's sort of  in a trance, absorbing impressions of tools and materials.  some idea will come into my mind while I'm there.



#27 alabama

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 12:47 PM

I have been making long neck bottles and vases.  I have been unable to get them to stay put when trimming. The bottom of the vase is larger than the top, so they tend to not hold steady even if I use clay to hold it still.

 

Hey,

      It sounds to me that the vessel may be too dry to stick to the bat or your tools might be dull and you're compensating by pushing harder than you think.

I make 16th century copies of Bellarmine jars and 17th c. jugs which should be similiar in shape to your long neck bottles.  As soon as my vessels come off

the bats I palm in the bottom and cover with plastic.  I trim from the top down, while the clay is still "tacky".  I allow the weight of the jar to hold itself in place.  If by chance I need tabs of clay to hold the foot in place, its usually slip from my bucket wiped along the foot and bat.  You just need something to hold

the vessel in place temporarily.  I don't believe in Giffin Grips for a couple of reasons..

1. They cost money.  2. They only guarantee that the base is centered.  And since I trim everything right side up, that doesn't seem to work for me.

And if you turn the vessel over to trim a foot, then only the rim is centered.

I do have to re-center 2 - 4 times as I trim from top to bottom, but that is ok since otherwise, I'd trim one side thinner than the other.  I have used Giffin Grips and chucks in the past, but now see no use in them.

 

Also, check the dullness of your trimming tools.

Keep us posted,

Alabama



#28 Pres

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 06:47 PM

'bama, a little correction here when dealing with the GG. When using rods and pads the pot is centered at the point of the pads on the pot, not the rim.  At the same time, when trimming something like a bowl or a plate the pads at the base work well and quickly. To trim a stem and bowl and then assemble on the wheel the GG works very well and very quickly. I have trimmed chalice bowls using water or even clay chocks, then assembled the stems on(I  always trim stems first) and make certain they are centered and level in that way. However the amount of play at the top of the upside down chalice would often break the bottom chock hold or the water seal. GG holds firmer. But then, maybe it is only me. . . .


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