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Trimming Issues


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#1 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:35 PM

I have been making long neck bottles and vases.  I have been unable to get them to stay put when trimming. The bottom of the vase is larger than the top, so they tend to not hold steady even if I use clay to hold it still. I have thrown a "chuck" But since the clay is soft on the chuck, it doesn't seem strong enough to keep the form still, top-heavy when upside down.  I also have trouble with the chuck clay sticking too much to the pot that I am trying to trim.  I have tried using stoneware to mount the white porcelain so it has a stronger clay body to hold it up, but I have the same issues and it leaves ugly brown marks on my porcelain what require scraping and sponging off…. 

 

Does anyone have a solution? 


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#2 clay lover

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:38 PM

What about doing the trimming by under cutting at the base while it is on the bat, before wiring it off?

I use one of those metal triangular trimmers on the long rod and wood handle.  set it on the bat at the bottom of the bottle and let it do the work.  Makes a nice shadow line and takes away the extra clay at the bottom edge.



#3 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:44 PM

I have been doing a little "pre trim" with the wood throwing tool but not fully. I was hoping to get a foot and to remove clay from the bottom center of the pot.  

 

I feel like a cheater when I don't fully trim the bottom and I just "thumb off" the edges of a pre trimmed pot… It's hard to break that mindset.  


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#4 Tyler Miller

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:44 PM

Have you tried trimming when the chuck is leather hard?  If I'm on the ball, throw a chuck before I throw anything, and time it so that the chuck is as hard if not a little harder than the pieces I need to trim.  If I'm having trouble getting things to stick, I'll put down fresh clay buttons of the same body to hold things in place.



#5 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:45 PM

god forbid I have been looking at the griffin grip and trying to resist the strong temptation to giving in to that evil ;)  As a new potter I don't want to start bad habits 


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#6 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:48 PM

Have you tried trimming when the chuck is leather hard?  If I'm on the ball, throw a chuck before I throw anything, and time it so that the chuck is as hard if not a little harder than the pieces I need to trim.  If I'm having trouble getting things to stick, I'll put down fresh clay buttons of the same body to hold things in place.

No- this is a great idea. The only problem I have with that is I usually have no idea what the dimensions of my pots will be until they are made.  I would love to be able to throw something that looks like a drawn out plan with measurements.  But It is a goal to aim for


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#7 Mark C.

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:50 PM

I suggest learning to tap center 1st but you can do this without that

the way to trim a form other than the actual bottom is  pat bottom of pot so its very slight concave or flat but not domed on bottom

wet wheel head with a mist and tap center and let clay grab surface (dry slightly)-then trim 

I have done pitchers this way for 40 years.

Mark


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#8 Pres

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:50 PM

When you throw a throwing chuck, make it pretty hefty. Works well when the bottle is leather hard. Dry the top edge of the chuck with a dry sponge before placing the bottle upside down in the chuck.  Some bottles can be trimmed when upright and held on the wheel head with water. However those formed with steep undercut are best trimmed upside down.

 

I made a chuck for my griffin grip out of plumbing parts, PVC pipe, flange, rubber seal and foam seat ring. It works really well for my chalice stems, and would do the same for bottles. And not griffins are not evil, and every tool has a place, as the griffin does for me.


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#9 Mark C.

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:53 PM

as far as a gif fen grip learn to center by tapping (look this up on web)

learn the good skills 1st

after you are very proficient and you need to trim lots of things at once then and only then get the giffin

If you do it now it will be a crutch and you will never learn the right way.

Mark


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#10 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:59 PM

If you're going to do a lot of bottles, bisque a couple of decent chucks, and pack clay onto the chuck only if you need to. And don't ever use different clay for your lugs...



#11 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 10:01 PM

I can tap center and trim a bowl or mug upside down. I am having trouble with gravity when my items are either tall or bottom heavy (like a long neck bottle or small spout) (because inverted they are top heavy when trimming)  I think the leather hard chuck and the idea of making a thicker more heavy duty chuck might help. 

 

 

These items were particularly hard for me to trim, I am so used to making bowls and mugs, I am re learning how to trim shapes like this.  

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#12 Mark C.

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:33 AM

Those items can trim easy with the wet the wheel head and trim upright when they stick to the head after tap centering.

Unless you need to trim the bottom and if thats the case I'm in the camp that says make some chucks of various sizes and use them

For me get the bottom thickness right and tap center them on wet wheel head then trim sides near bottom if thats where it needs trimming.

Mark


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#13 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 07:54 AM

Thanks! I have to get the mentality out that i need a foot ring. I think I will be making some chucks as well.  


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#14 Mark369

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 07:56 AM

Tall tapered Bisque chucks with thick round lip.  Will allow narrower bottle to slide in deeper to hold better.   If you use bats you could dedicate one to trimming only and leave chuck on it to speed up future centering.


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#15 GEP

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 08:26 AM

You can leave the bottles centered on your bat, then trim the sides of the bottle while it is still right-side-up. Then you only need to trim the very bottom of the pot upside-down. This is how I approach tall cylinders and small-neck pots. The triangular metal trimmer that claylover mentions is very useful for this.

Giffin grip is a great tool. It is not a substitute for clay skills. For me it only saves me the time of putting down clay wads to hold down my pots for trimming. It's method of holding small-neck pots upside-down is very effective, but nothing more than a chuck that can be adjusted for size.
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#16 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 08:56 AM

You could improvise by making a chuck from a coffer can or bucket, center it secure it with clay, put a thick coil on the rim and trim it to evenly support you pots. Making chucks in the long run is a good idea and good to have the right tools when you nee them. Mea's trimming upright is also a good time saver.


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#17 williamt

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 11:42 AM

I use a bisqued chuck of sorts. I usually have several tall, vase or utensil holder shaped items waiting for glaze. I just use some clay to center the holder (one deep enough for the neck of the bottle), then put the bottle in, stabilize it with a clay ring, and trim the bottom of
the bottle. I'd just do a picture, but I'm not at my shop :)

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#18 timbo_heff

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:12 PM

Get a utensil crock from your kitchen: center it, attach to wheel with clay, coil some clay on the rim, cover with supermarket bag plastic to not muss up your new pot too much: Easy trimming chuck for most bottle shapes



#19 neilestrick

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:20 PM

I keep several bisqued chucks in the studio of various sizes so I always have one when I need one. Just center up the chuck, anchor it with clay lugs, and center up the pot in the chuck. To hold the pot steady you have to put a lot of pressure on it while you trim. To keep from pushing through the pot with your finger, put a Snapple lid on the pot and push on it. Use 1 finger and let the lid spin with the pot. Make sure the shoulder of the pot is firm enough that it won't collapse or get marred by the chuck. Keep your speed up while trimming. If the wheel is going too slow the pot will be more likely to go off center.


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#20 bevodaniel

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:24 PM

If your chuck is freshly thrown and wet try covering it with plastic wrap. Stuff the plastic down the center a bit and cover area where bottle form touches the chuck.






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