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Foot Rings And Puddles


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#1 Darcy Kane

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 07:46 AM

I do my best not to be the one stuck emptying the dishwasher, but when I do end up with the job I hate the puddles that form on the bum of bowls and mugs.  I usually use a dishtowel to mop up trapped water before removing the cups/mugs/bowls.  I make a majority of my pieces flat on the bottom so they don't need to be trimmed but occasionally one has to use a foot.  I don't remember where I saw it, but some ingenious potter put a few small notches in the foot ring to let the water drain out.  I might see if I can incorporate a notch or two with a signature, two birds; one stone sort of thing.  Anyone else cooked up a good solution to trapped water?

 



#2 Pres

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 07:52 AM

I have done foot rings with cut outs so that the bowl looks a little more fancy, but have also pierced some round holes in the base of the foot ring to allow drainage. Be careful when glazing that they don't close up-it helps to bevel inside and outside of hole.


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#3 schmism

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:11 PM

I put most of my bowls that have feet on an angle so 90% of the water drains off.

 

My mugs and a lot of my small cereal type (1lb) bowls have no feet.



#4 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:13 PM

Good idea with the little beveled hole. When you do things right, nobody knows you have done anything at all.



#5 williamt

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:22 PM

I've done foot rings with 3 cutouts equally spaced. That seems to work. I like your idea of incorporating the cutouts into a signature.
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#6 Chantay

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:05 PM

Any pics???


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#7 Babs

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:35 AM

potter here puts 2 holes in the footrings of larger dishes and platters.Then they can be hung if buyer wants to.

If I place a deeper footring on pot, I notch, 3, the footring for certain shapes.



#8 williamt

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:47 AM

Here is a picture of a possible solution, kind of what I said above. Not the prettiest, and I don't usually glaze the bottom. But the contrast helps the example.Attached File  image.jpg   133.75KB   13 downloads
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#9 earthfan

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:41 AM

I have copied an idea that I saw on a range of plastic containers on sale in Australia. I turn the bottoms flat and mark where the foot rim would have been. Then I stick on small balls of clay, evenly spaced along the marked line. To get the little balls the same size, I extrude the clay from a clay gun and cut equal lengths which I then roll into balls on my damp palm. My computer will draw regular shapes of any number of sides. I print them and cut them out to use as a guide for the placement of the little balls.

Top each ball with a little dab of wax emulsion, and the bowls and cups are ready to raw glaze.



#10 Biglou13

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 08:02 AM

http://flyeschool.co...e-tea-bowl-feet
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#11 Mark C.

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 04:08 PM

This maybe a pet peeve of mine but-life is to short to worry about the amount of water inside a slanted foot in the dishwasher.I unload the dishwaster  all the time with hand made bowls and the drops go away as I stack the bowls up.Its not even kind of a problem.

If you are bothered by this cut out parts of the foot but be aware this also will cuase it to-chip or warp depending on how and wear its done

I have cut out the feet of colenders as it needs to drain but that a funtional issue-water in the dishwasher is a nit picky issue.

One of the places pots suffer over the years (say 30+) is chipped feet so cut them out with this in mind.

Rant over.

Mark


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#12 Chantay

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 05:17 PM

 

One of the places pots suffer over the years (say 30+) is chipped feet so cut them out with this in mind.

 

Mark, noted.  Once I began making pottery I started looking at the bottoms of everything.  One thing I have started to do is make the out side of the foot under cut and rounded.  I have learned to be very careful with my pots before bisque firing to maintain a very smooth and unmarred surface.  Nothing completes the look of a pot/bowl like a good foot.


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#13 Babs

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 06:43 PM

Slightly rounding the edge of the feet can extend the time before chipping starts , a sharp abrupt edge to a foot will chip.






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