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Stellaria

Throwing Flanged Lids?

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I've watched Ben Culbertson's video on making lidded forms, and he covers making a flanged lid. But I like to see multiple potters' methods, and I can't seem to find any other videos on YouTube.

 

How do you make yours? Are there other terms for a flanged lid that I could use to search? Any video suggestions?

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Like many, I throw mine upside down. I make, what looks like a bowl or dish, with a narrow foot, then push the rim inward, to create the flange. Once it dries a bit, I will define the flange a bit, with a loop tool, if necessary.

 

Alternately, you can always build the flange into the vessel itself.

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I have really enjoyed watching these videos on lids, I hope it is of some help to you!

 

Throwing Lids for a jar/pot with Hsin-Chuen Lin :

How to make an ordinary lid extraordinary: Adam Field -

Pottery demo by Diego Maher, throwing covered jar with lid:

 

I know that Simon Leach and Bill van Gilder have videos on these lids...but wasn't able to find it after I saw your question and was looking through my archive of videos. Also, I've seen a lot of videos related to teapots which have a flanged lid.

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Alright. I know you're looking on more of the throwing end, but solid throwing is only a small part of making a stellar lid. The trick you see floating around is grinding the lids post-firing. If you have access to the grits used for hand-lapping glass, you can get a really nice polish and fit on a round lid, otherwise, grinding compound available at a local automotive store will work fine. The water-based stuff is easiest to use, its pretty much silicon carbide grit with glycol and water.

 

When I know that I'll be grinding a lid, I'll make the lid a hair larger than needed, and provide a thick flange and gallery. This allows me to grind the lid into a perfect seat. The lids actually ring when taken care of in this manner.

 

For use on wood-fired pots, I'll use an alumina paste on the flange and gallery, which gets sanded off by hand before grinding the lid.

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But I like to see multiple potters' methods, and I can't seem to find any other videos on YouTube.

 

How have you not seen the vid of Jerry Marshall throwing lids off the hump.   He does amazing things!

 

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The key to making flanged lids without wasting a lot of clay and getting them the correct size without too much adjustment:

1. Throw them off the hump. You'll never be able to guess just how much clay you'll need for the lid unless you've worked out a production formula.

2. Center the clay to the width of your caliper measurement, then open it all the way out to the edge. When you pull up the flange it will be very near the correct size. Then just dig in below and pull out the lip.

 

If I have time alter today I'll get a video up.

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I think in a different Jerry vid he talks about throwing all his lids to half inch increments.    SO today's job is to throw 200 lids.  50- 4" 50- 4.5" 50- 5" 50- 5.5"  bisk them then set them aside.  anytime he throws a jar needing a lid he throws it to one of those dimensions.  bisk it then find a lid out of your 50 of that size that fits it well, glaze the pair and whola! perfect lid for the jar.  

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For me throwing a flanged lid was learning to leave a thick rim at the top of a shallow bowl to use the index finger nail to separate the flange a rim in one motion, then a second motion to  raise the flange up and inward. Once I got the hang of that the design of a sloped rim or even a double flange, inside and outside that wrapped the lip of the jar was possible. These work well with canisters as an extra barrier.

 

When the lid fit well, but I wanted a smooth feel to things I found simple soft scrub or a scouring powder made into a paste would work in between the lid and jar turning vigorously on the two back and forth until polished smooth. This was done after the glaze firing by the way. :unsure:

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How have you not seen the vid of Jerry Marshall throwing lids off the hump. He does amazing things!

 

I have no clue how I hadn't seen that before, but...whaaaa? How'd he do that?!

I think I'll save that trick for after I can get lids to do what I want them to :)

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I measure all lids in metric as it's easier to make replacements as it's a better measure system than ours here here in USA .

Mark

 

I hope the USA goes metric before I die.

 

 

Silly Neil......

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I measure all lids in metric as it's easier to make replacements as it's a better measure system than ours here here in USA .

Mark

 

I hope the USA goes metric before I die.

 

 

Can honestly say I've never seen that on anyones bucket list! 

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Speaking as a Brit who learnt  the Imperial system at school and went on to work with the metric system as a carpenter (and one who is very resistant to change) I can assure you that the metric system has many benefits.

 

Of course despite changing to the metric system about 40 years ago we can still buy things like a 2'6" door, etc. etc, .but for calculating  rafter lengths or balustrade spacings the metric system is a joy compared to the Imperial system.

 

I will say though, for some reason, I still cant see  e.g.- 519mm - but I know exactly what 20 -7/16" looks like.

 

There's nothing stopping anyone from using the metric measuring system for their own purposes, but if you decide to make a start, I'd say forget about centimetres - just work with millimetres and metres.

 

Can you buy metric rulers and tape measures in the USA?

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You can, but they're not terribly easy to come by, for sure. I seem to remember them being far easier to find when I was a child than they are now. For a while there was a bit of a push for kids to get used to both, so rulers, tapes, squares, etc. had both systems marked on them. But that idea seems to have been given up on, for the most part :/

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