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gkillmaster

Reduction - What Is It Good For?

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Hi,

 

For a lot of pottery, I prefer the look of reduction. I just found out the possibility of using electric kilns to do reduction firings? I had no idea about this.

I would love to know more. Like, does the result resemble using a gas kiln? Does the firing reduce the life of the elements? Does it produce toxic fumes? What is the best way to accomplish this? etc.. etc...

 

many thanks,

 

Greg K.

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From the title of this thread...... I want to reply :

 

"Ab-so -lutly nothin'.  Say it agin ya-all.  "  (Only the old folks might get this ;).

 

Yes reduction electrics are VERY common in Japan.  Yes, it takes life off the elements.... but that is the "cost of doing business".  Compared to building the typical gas kiln........ an electric reduction kiln is cheaper and easier to get inot places you can't get a gas kiln. 

 

Yes they produce the same  potential of CO and other byproducts of partial combustion (aldehydes, etc.).  You need far better venting than the typical "Orton Kiln Vent" kind of ventilation.  They just don't produce it in the same volume or at the same temperature as fuel fired kiln.

 

Possibilities for fuel include charcoal, wood, propane, butane or natural gas.  (DON'T follow the frequent recommendation for using mothballs!!!!!)

 

best,

 

.............................john

kdem and gkillmaster like this

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From the title of this thread...... I want to reply :

 

"Ab-so -lutly nothin'.  Say it agin ya-all.  "  (Only the old folks might get this ;).

 

Yes reduction electrics are VERY common in Japan.  Yes, it takes life off the elements.... but that is the "cost of doing business".  Compared to building the typical gas kiln........ an electric reduction kiln is cheaper and easier to get inot places you can't get a gas kiln. 

 

Yes they produce the same  potential of CO and other byproducts of partial combustion (aldehydes, etc.).  You need far better venting than the typical "Orton Kiln Vent" kind of ventilation.  They just don't produce it in the same volume or at the same temperature as fuel fired kiln.

 

Possibilities for fuel include charcoal, wood, propane, butane or natural gas.  (DON'T follow the frequent recommendation for using mothballs!!!!!)

 

best,

 

.............................john

 

wow, thanks JBaymore for so much information with so few words. Yeh, the subject name is exactly what was going through my head when I posted! Never imagined anyone would pick up on it... WAR!

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From the title of this thread...... I want to reply :

 

"Ab-so -lutly nothin'.  Say it agin ya-all.  "  (Only the old folks might get this ;).

 

Got it, loved it, and killed a few brain cells listening to it :D

 

 

Inspires me to write a song that good for modern times. But that's what "Killing in the Name" was for!

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From the title of this thread...... I want to reply :

 

"Ab-so -lutly nothin'.  Say it agin ya-all.  "  (Only the old folks might get this ;).

 

 

best,

 

.............................john

My uncle Terry was their roadie......

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Just sticking to your question -reduction what is it good for

Well that's an easy one it makes my colors snappy and brilliant in a reduction kiln

I makes my pots stand out so folks want to by them

It has made my life as a potter successful

It all starts with a reduction kiln and the right glazes.

It not like paint as it's always different and that's what the best part is.

Mark

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I purchased a gas kiln for the express purpose of reduction firing Shino glazes after I was introduced to them. It is my perferred glaze and firing method.

 

On another note..because of the size of my gas kiln, and my production / "second job" cycle, I can only fill the kiln 3-4 times per year. When I saw the video, my thought was TEST kiln for reduction firing! I have two small electric kilns. One is manual, and one has a non-functioning programmer.Besides venting issues, what pitfalls might one consider when converting one of these kilns? (This question might be better as a new thread...but I'm not sure what the etiquette is to start on)

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John, I think you underestimate the younger generations. I totally got that reference. Though I'm not quite as young anymore, and that seems to be even more true each year...

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Benzine,

 

I'm guessing that for you that is an "oldie".  For me it was a "newie".  ;)

 

best,

 

..............john

Yes indeed John.

I remember a few years back, a student called a song "old". I told them, it wasn't old, it came out in said specific year. They responded, "I wasn't even born yet.". I then shook my fist at them, and proceeded to collect all the Frisbees that landed on my property, and hide out in my house...

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I purchased a gas kiln for the express purpose of reduction firing Shino glazes after I was introduced to them. It is my perferred glaze and firing method.

 

On another note..because of the size of my gas kiln, and my production / "second job" cycle, I can only fill the kiln 3-4 times per year. When I saw the video, my thought was TEST kiln for reduction firing! I have two small electric kilns. One is manual, and one has a non-functioning programmer.Besides venting issues, what pitfalls might one consider when converting one of these kilns? (This question might be better as a new thread...but I'm not sure what the etiquette is to start on)

Go to youtube and put in "convert electric kiln to gas."  The truth is out there. 

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Dharsi, others,

 

That was a "duh" forehead slap moment.  Of course instructions / information relative to converting an electric kiln are available via YouTube.  It must have been all these references to late 60's, culture revolution songs that I had my brain forgetting the Internet even existed!!!!!  Peace out.

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