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JBaymore

What The Heck Is Glaze Chemistry All About? | Sharon, Nh | Sat July 26, 2014 9A-4P

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What The Heck is Glaze Chemistry All About? 

Sharon Art Center Campus of New Hampshire Institute of Art

 

Professor John Baymore

 

This one day, seminar-type workshop will provide participants

with a basic understanding of the core concepts

that can impact the creation, use, and evaluation of

ceramic glazes for studio use. The instruction of the

widely popular ceramic chemistry calculation software,

Insight, and its priciples will be presented. Troubleshooting

of fired results, “food-safe†qualities, health and safety,

legal requirements, and ventilation concepts will also be

touched upon. Handouts will be provided to all participants.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring

a PC or Mac laptop to test out a trail copy of the Insight

software.

 

Prerequisite: Intermediate ceramics skills.

Limit: 15

 

Sat, July 26 / 9 am – 4 pm / 1 Day

SCER074 / Tuition: $80

 

TO REGISTER:

(603) 836-2564

MANCHESTER CAMPUS:

IN PERSON: Mon – Fri, 8:15 am – 4:30 pm

Fuller Hall, 156 Hanover St.

 

BY EMAIL: CERegistration@nhia.edu

BY MAIL: New Hampshire Institute of Art,

Continuing Education Office, 148 Concord

Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858

BY FAX: (603) 641-1832

 

SHARON ARTS CENTER CAMPUS:

IN PERSON: Mon – Fri, 9 am – 3 pm

BY EMAIL: register@sharonarts.org

BY MAIL: Sharon Arts Center,

457 NH Route 123, Sharon, NH 03458-901SCHOLARSHIPS:

 

A limited number of scholarship funds are available to adults, youth and teens based on financial need. Scholarships are awarded on a first come, first serve basis. An application form and deadline information is available on our website at www.nhia.edu/ce or www.sharonarts.org.

 

http://www.nhia.edu/assets/Uploads/PDFs/CE--CT/NHIA5866x9CEsum14web.pdf

 

 

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Sometimes I WISH I was living in the U.S. - with access to courses such as this. I've spent hours looking for a ceramics course here in the UK that includes the theoretical and chemistry side of things, but to no avail! There are a few short courses covering various ceramics techniques but precious little else. I'm a retired 59 year old and would love to take a formal ceramics course - something more structured than the standard adult education evening courses - pinch pot, coil pot, slab building, throwing - work at your own pace......... If anyone in the UK can point me in the right direction I'd be really grateful.

Chilly likes this

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John . . . opportunity calls. You and NHIA should offer one of those massively open on-line classes on glazes. Reach audiences around the world. Crash the internet bandwidth. Etc.

 

Seriously, an idea worth thinking about. Fills a void.

+1

 

John, 

sounds great!. Have you considered offering as an e-seminar? I am sure you would have an audience..

Marcia

+1

 

Sometimes I WISH I was living in the U.S. - with access to courses such as this. I've spent hours looking for a ceramics course here in the UK that includes the theoretical and chemistry side of things, but to no avail! There are a few short courses covering various ceramics techniques but precious little else. I'm a retired 59 year old and would love to take a formal ceramics course - something more structured than the standard adult education evening courses - pinch pot, coil pot, slab building, throwing - work at your own pace......... If anyone in the UK can point me in the right direction I'd be really grateful.

+1 

 

I was reading with my mind elsewhere and I saw "Manchester" and sat up and read it properly, then slumped back.

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John . . . opportunity calls. You and NHIA should offer one of those massively open on-line classes on glazes. Reach audiences around the world. Crash the internet bandwidth. Etc.

Seriously, an idea worth thinking about. Fills a void.

 

+1

 

John, 

sounds great!. Have you considered offering as an e-seminar? I am sure you would have an audience..

Marcia

 

+1

 

Sometimes I WISH I was living in the U.S. - with access to courses such as this. I've spent hours looking for a ceramics course here in the UK that includes the theoretical and chemistry side of things, but to no avail! There are a few short courses covering various ceramics techniques but precious little else. I'm a retired 59 year old and would love to take a formal ceramics course - something more structured than the standard adult education evening courses - pinch pot, coil pot, slab building, throwing - work at your own pace......... If anyone in the UK can point me in the right direction I'd be really grateful.

 

+1 

 

I was reading with my mind elsewhere and I saw "Manchester" and sat up and read it properly, then slumped back.

The US, we fought for, then celebrate our independence from Britain, then promptly named a bunch of our cities after towns there.

 

I lived in Manchester for a while, just not for the U.K., or even New Hampshire for that matter.

Celia UK and Chilly like this

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John . . . opportunity calls. You and NHIA should offer one of those massively open on-line classes on glazes. Reach audiences around the world. Crash the internet bandwidth. Etc.

Seriously, an idea worth thinking about. Fills a void.

+1

 

John, 

sounds great!. Have you considered offering as an e-seminar? I am sure you would have an audience..

Marcia

+1

 

Sometimes I WISH I was living in the U.S. - with access to courses such as this. I've spent hours looking for a ceramics course here in the UK that includes the theoretical and chemistry side of things, but to no avail! There are a few short courses covering various ceramics techniques but precious little else. I'm a retired 59 year old and would love to take a formal ceramics course - something more structured than the standard adult education evening courses - pinch pot, coil pot, slab building, throwing - work at your own pace......... If anyone in the UK can point me in the right direction I'd be really grateful.

+1 

 

I was reading with my mind elsewhere and I saw "Manchester" and sat up and read it properly, then slumped back.

The US, we fought for, then celebrate our independence from Britain, then promptly named a bunch of our cities after towns there.

 

I lived in Manchester for a while, just not for the U.K., or even New Hampshire for that matter.

 

YOu can get lucky some times!

Your accent may have been even less translatable!! The weather may have been worse..

But you would have had metric maths, much easier!

SOme of my best friends are Manchurians?? IS this the correct description? :D

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