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Milk Bath?


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#41 Benzine

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 08:01 AM

Just a factoid
Milk on Molokai is around 10$ a gallon
This may cut down on milk baths.
Mark


Wow! I knew goods, were more expensive, on the islands, but yeah just wow.

I guess that's what happens, when there just isn't room, on the picturesque hills and beaches, for dairy cows.
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#42 Stephen

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Posted 05 May 2014 - 11:09 AM

Well I just want to say I am sorry for doubting this process. Next time I will remain more open minded.



#43 Bradleysonofhagen

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 09:50 AM

Sounds like the sealing characteristic of milk bathing is the fat content in the milk. I am now curious what half and half cream or heavy cream would yield due to a higher fat content. It was mentioned before what yogurt might bring to the table as well.

Also, I am curious if this process would be a good option for sealing a pit fired pot. Perhaps a vase you would want to have water tight for flowers and the likes. I am thinking a sealed interior, not a surface for eating.

#44 Stellaria

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 01:16 PM

Give it a try. The least you could get is a bit of wasted milk and some browner pots.

I'm waiting for some test tiles to be taken to ^6 for me to try the milk process on, to see if they will take on enough of the milk to make any difference. Normally I'm not a very experiment-y kind of person, but this has me wanting to play with possibilities!

#45 Stellaria

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 09:44 PM

^6 test tiles have been added to my Milk-firing gallery.
Starting with fully vitrified clay rather than bisque is definitely the way to go. I got way better color, and a much more glossy and water-resistant finish without having to wax at all.
I still have a lot of fine-tuning to do to get my technique down reliably, and I'm sure I'll think of other variables to test in the future. But for now...I like!

#46 jrgpots

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 10:34 PM

^6 test tiles have been added to my Milk-firing gallery.
Starting with fully vitrified clay rather than bisque is definitely the way to go. I got way better color, and a much more glossy and water-resistant finish without having to wax at all.
I still have a lot of fine-tuning to do to get my technique down reliably, and I'm sure I'll think of other variables to test in the future. But for now...I like!


Look at my post on obvara pit firing. It's about milk protein. It sounds like a mix between your firing and obvara firing.

Jed

#47 Up in Smoke Pottery

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 03:09 AM

Stell, I love the test tiles you posted.  I have a few pots waiting to try this, it may be a few months before I get to it, but am definitely intrigued.  I did come across snippets of this technique when I was researching Obvara, but didn't pursue it at the time.  Thanks for reminding me.


Chad

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#48 Stellaria

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 09:21 PM

I look forward to seeing what you manage with your experiments :)
I'm just waiting for the rest of my red ware to get ^6 fired, then they'll get the milk treatment. I'm excited - I used texture stamps on some of them this time.




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