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Milk Bath?


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#21 Stellaria

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 09:34 AM

So about to cone 020, then, correct? Do they even make Orton cones that low-temp? My kiln only has a kiln sitter - nothing to register actual temp or to regulate. Would I be better off making a bunch of stuff to justify a special firing in the computer-controlled kiln at the arts center? Or could I just keep an eye on it through a spy hole until they get as dark as I want?

#22 Tom Banfield

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 12:25 PM

I've only use my raku kiln and, believe it or not, our oven. I have to watch the raku kiln very closely because it heats fairly fast. Our oven has a top heat of 550. It's a little below the recommended temp, but it still works. Once it reaches temperature, I watch through the window until I get the color I want. Both processes only take a few minutes. The raku is faster, but the colors vary with the air currents. The oven gives a more even color, but takes a little longer. Also, be careful handling the piece once it has Bennett's in the milk. The oils from your fingere can a actually leave prints.
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#23 Babs

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 01:59 PM

Not a joke, how do you think yoghurt would work?



#24 Stellaria

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 02:06 PM

I will check my oven!
So would it be best to fire the pot to complete vitrification first? The clay I'm using is a ^04-8 (not sure how that's possible, but whatever) red-brown, but sometimes the studio only bisques to 07. I should specify that I need it to go to 04 right off, then, correct?

#25 olbkaka

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 03:53 PM

Hey guys!

I have noticed a link about my pots and you here are ansure about technology :)

Why not to ask me directly?))

I think it would be more helpfull then guessing how to))

Here are more images: https://www.facebook...85791482&type=3

they shows I'm not selling something produced at a factory)) on some items there are even fingertips.

Actually it is true that I'm not making them by myself and I'm just a seller. The maker lives in a village and mostly sells his items at Kyiv and Chernihiv area. But I can ask him about some specific questions.



#26 Stellaria

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:07 PM

That would be excellent! Mainly, I asked here rather than asking directly because first, I also sell pottery on etsy and I know some people are leery of sharing "trade secrets", which is understandable. And second, just because I was curious if anyone here had tried it.

But yes, I'd love it if you could get more information on the process from the potter that makes the pieces you sell! Type of clay, firing temperature for the first firing, if the final firing temperature is held for a certain length of time...

#27 olbkaka

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:31 PM

You are right makers are like to have their own secrets =)

About "milking" ("molochinnya" how it calls here) it is quite open info here. But recently my friend started additionally to cover finished ceramics with special mixture "ganozis" made of wax and oils, probably this part he won't tell.

As for temperatures first firing is around 1000C and second not higher then 350-400C because if temperature will be higher the milk will burn out.
As for clay - he uses bright one as image attached. If you wish I may ask him for certain sort :)

Milk should be "fat" that is why here was used milk of domestic cow, Usually domestic milk has more fat then one from a shop.

Here is some video of the process 
wBCBa-gFlk4.jpg



#28 Stellaria

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:35 PM

Thank you for the fast reply!

#29 olbkaka

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:45 PM

no problem) tomorrow I'll ask the maker about time.

Now it is 0:45 and it won't be polite from me to call him :-p



#30 Tom Banfield

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:01 AM

Well, for what it's worth, I bisque my pots to 04. I soak them in whole milk. I then fire them to 550 - 650f, as mentioned before. I have had good luck in both my oven and my raku kiln, getting everything from a light creamy color to dark chocolate. I use beeswax to polish the outside of the pots. I have never tried yogurt. I know it's the fat in the milk that seals the pot, so it might work as long as you didn't use fat free. Might be worth a try. Well that's my two cents.
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#31 ayjay

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:51 AM

Is anyone else seeing some strong similarities between those two pots?

 

The pieces don't look at all the same to me, between the two sellers.

 

Actually it is true that I'm not making them by myself and I'm just a seller. The maker lives in a village and mostly sells his items at Kyiv and Chernihiv area. But I can ask him about some specific questions.

 

 

Ayjay looks around, and leaves again:  complete with smug grin.   :D  ;)

 



#32 Stellaria

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 12:51 PM

I gave it a try last night, after bringing my fired test bowl home from the studio. I gave it three sponge-downs with milk, allowing it to dry in between, then put it in the cold oven and set it to 550°F, which is the hottest my oven would go. I think it was in the oven for close to an hour after reaching temp.

I did manage to leave fingerprints on it. Lesson learned.
I didn't get decently even milk collection in all of the grooves, and it shows in the final result. I'll shoot for that as a goal for next time.

Once it was all done, I mixed up some beeswax and olive oil (2 parts to 1 part) melted together and gave the warm pot a couple rub-downs with it. By the time I was done coating it, it had cooled, had milky waxy sticky spots, and was covered with lint from the terry cloth rag I used to apply the wax. So I stuck it back into the oven at 200°F for about 10 minutes. Once out, the lint all brushed off easily.

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#33 neilestrick

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 01:31 PM

Won't the olive oil go rancid at some point? Or does the beeswax seal and preserve it? Just wondering because I know vegetable oils should never be used to seal wood surfaces that come in contact with food, like cutting boards and butcher blocks, because the oil goes rancid.


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#34 Min

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 01:37 PM

Good for you for trying this. Sounds like you have lots of experimenting coming up  :)



#35 Stellaria

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Posted 30 April 2014 - 03:54 PM

I've never had a problem with beeswax/oil polish going bad on me before, and I use it on cutting boards and stuff. I suppose I could've slathered it in bacon grease instead ;)

#36 Tom Banfield

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 04:18 PM

Congratulations! These look great.
Tom Banfield

#37 Mark C.

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 06:08 PM

Just a factoid

Milk on Molokai is around 10$ a gallon

This may cut down on milk baths.

Mark


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#38 Babs

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 06:15 PM

So the potter is being ripped off??



#39 Babs

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 06:20 PM

So about to cone 020, then, correct? Do they even make Orton cones that low-temp? My kiln only has a kiln sitter - nothing to register actual temp or to regulate. Would I be better off making a bunch of stuff to justify a special firing in the computer-controlled kiln at the arts center? Or could I just keep an eye on it through a spy hole until they get as dark as I want?

You can get  a thermocouple which slides through a small apeture in your kiln wall, usually is one about mid kiln depth, which gives a temp reading form the area of kiln into which it protrudes. Orton does go down to that cone. With the thermocouple, you could use a higher cone and go by temp, but isn't giving a totally true picture, if you get what I mean.



#40 Stellaria

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Posted 03 May 2014 - 08:16 PM

Yeah, the kiln I have is so tiny, if I was going to spend any money I'd just buy a bigger kiln :)
Thankfully, my home oven worked great for this technique. But thank you for the info!




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