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Stellaria

Do You Name Your Glaze Combinations?

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Not the individual glazes, as most of those already have descriptive names, but do you have individual names for combinations of glazes that work well together consistently?

 

I've started doing this first so I have a pretty name to put in my etsy listings that means more to a customer than the individual glaze names, and second so I have a kind of shorthand to mark pieces with when I'm planning out my glazing. It's way faster to write "marshmallow" than to write "nutmeg lining, stone white dip".

 

Does anyone else do this? Do you have a similar but different shorthand? Any favorites?

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Not the individual glazes, as most of those already have descriptive names, but do you have individual names for combinations of glazes that work well together consistently?

 

I've started doing this first so I have a pretty name to put in my etsy listings that means more to a customer than the individual glaze names, and second so I have a kind of shorthand to mark pieces with when I'm planning out my glazing. It's way faster to write "marshmallow" than to write "nutmeg lining, stone white dip".

 

Does anyone else do this? Do you have a similar but different shorthand? Any favorites?

Here's one from Mary -Jo Bole when we were grad students at Alfred

The Greeney Goopy Gloppy Glaze.

Pretty accurate description.

Tom.

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I do name my combinations, but mostly for my own tracking/inventory sake. I keep a detailed inventory of every first-quality piece that comes out of the kiln. In order to keep track of what I've made, what has sold, what's out at galleries, I update the inventory every week or so, and always before a show or a gallery delivery. To keep the "ITEM" column of my spreadsheet from becoming 6 inches wide, I'll give glaze combos names. Floating Blue over Fake Celadon = Floating Celadon. Rose Red over Calypso = Alligator. Old Yellow over Clear = Cloud.

I'll also name glaze styles/processes/more involved combinations. IE: I make pieces that I'll glaze all over in my "Cloud" combo, then dip the rim in a blue glaze for some contrasting drippy action. I first made a set of mugs in this style for my friend Elise, so rather than naming the colorway "Old Yellow over Clear with Calypso rim dip," I just name pieces "Elise's Mug" or "Elise's Cereal Bowl," etc.

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I've got one I originally called Rashmi - named after the colleague for whom I made the pencil pot, (when I worked at a desk !)  It's ......  oooohooohh brain's gone empty..... white over heritage? silver   -  but have since renamed quatermass - see the square pot

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Haha yes!  We totally do this in my studio.  The first favorite glaze combo we made was "artsy glaze number 5" (5 being completely arbitrarily chosen).  And now any glaze combo involving Amaco's Oatmeal is "Artsy glaze #___".  We've also got "Galaxy" and "Alien cat" (long story...)

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I name all my glazes, that is one of the best bits about designing a glaze.

 

Currently I have Teapot blue, Apple white and an unnamed iron rich glaze.

 

The teapot blue came from the pan-tone colour that I could best match with the blue and it was called teapot blue :D Apple white is because the white very much reminded me of the old white Apple use to use on their computers/ipods.

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As a result of some triaxial glaze testing, I have a couple of containers with combinations of pre-mixed glazes.  I do have names for them, but for safety's sake I include the percentages of each glaze on the label.  My favorite is Saint Charlie Woo... a combination of St. John's Black, Charlie B. White, and Woo's Blue.

 

It is a whole different story on how (poorly) I manage to track the glazing combinations when I am applying them to a piece...I may actually do a good job of writing things down, but I am terrible at remembering to match things back up once they are out of the kiln.  Gee, I feel so much better having confessed that (NOT). :wacko:

 

-Paul

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