Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Stellaria

How Big Of A Bucket Do I Need?

Recommended Posts

My apologies, this is probably the dumbest of basic questions!

 

I have 5 lbs of a dry glaze mix. About how big of a bucket do I need to get to mix it up? I dip-glaze mugs, so I know I don't want a 5 gal because that would make the level too low for good dunking, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have a look around your house for something like a narrow small wastebasket or something of that shape. 5 lbs of dry glaze isn't going to make very much glaze. Find something just wide enough to fit your mug in without the handle banging into the side. I would pour the inside then hold the mug upside down and dip the outside, touch up any finger marks at the bottom. (if the mugs are thin you might need to let the inside glaze dry overnight before dipping the outside so the glaze layer on the outside is thick enough) Unless your mugs are small I don't think 5 lbs of dry glaze will make enough wet glaze to use tongs and dip, it's awkward to dip using a narrow mouthed bucket and I'm guessing this amount of glaze won't be deep enough to dip in with a wider mouthed pail or bucket. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, thanks :) I think I can get 1.5-2 gal buckets. (There's no recommended mixing instructions, as these are just made from inputted formulas on glazemixer.com All they do is mix the glaze formula for me.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You gotta convert pounds to grams. A one gallon ice cream pail will hold 1000 grams of glaze. A 5 gallon bucket will hold 6,000 to 10,000 grams of liquid glaze, give or take depending on how thick the glaze is.

TJR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 lbs will give you about one gallon of glaze; a two-gallon bucket, depending on width, may be too shallow to dunk. You might need to store the glaze in one bucket, then dump it into a large bowl or other container for use when glazing (but one deep enough to allow you to dunk the item).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mixing instructions from Mid-South:

 

"Opulence Glaze sold in powder form will need to be mixed with the correct amount of water and sieved through an 80 mesh screen. Basic Ratio of powder glaze to water by weight is 1 lb of powder glaze to 0.9 lbs of water. 5lb example: In One Gallon container, add 5lb of dry glaze to 4.5 lbs of water (9 cups). 25lb example: In Five Gallon container, add 25lb of dry glaze to 22.5 lb of water (45 cups). *Always add dry glaze to water. * Avoid breathing dust of any dry glaze. Wear appropriate respirator when mixing glaze and work in a well-ventilated area."

 

Each glaze will be a bit different, so you'll need to adjust water portion accordingly. You really need a container larger than 1 gallon to allow for stirring with drill/mixer. I prefer adding half water, then glaze, then rest of water. Keeps dust down and allows for slaking of glaze.

Stellaria and mregecko like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree with Biskit, rough estimate is 1 lb. dry mix equals 1 pint( 2 cups) of wet glaze

 

10,000 grams= 22 lbs = 'about' 31/2 gallons of finished mix.  This enough for a 5  gallon bucket.  You need mixing room and room for displacement when dipping.

I would have a hard time dipping mugs in that small an amount of glaze. ( 5 lbs. dry)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For most of my glazes I can only fit 8,500- 9,000 grams into a 5 gallon bucket. It leaves only a few inches at the top for dipping. It will vary depending on the glaze formula. Glazes higher in clay, feldspar or Gerstley will hold more water, therefore requiring a smaller batch. Glazes that have a lot of colorant or opacifier added will also require smaller batch sizes since you're adding so much on top of the 100%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to thank everyone also for your generous sharing of information. In trying to come up with the amounts of my first materials order, this is just what I needed to help figure it all out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×