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Fusing Glass With Clay

Glass Bowls Kiln Clay Firing Bowl Trimming Mug Vase Glaze

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#21 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 07:32 PM

Celica, glass will have different viscosities at different temperatures. If I'm understanding that you're just looking to melt crushed glass onto a glazed surface, you can adhere or temporarily fix the glass to the unfired glaze surface and glaze fire as usual. If you're looking to fuse formed pieces of glass with a glazed surface, you'd likely run into some expansion issues, nothing surmountable, but definitely a bit of a task to work through....



#22 celica

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 07:44 PM

thank you so much.  I dont want to adhere fully formed pieces, just add highlights with crushed glass.  Two other questions: have you any idea what to use to adhere it until it melts, would I use some sort of glue which would burn out and, do I have to lay the piece down so the glass wont run as it melts.



#23 Venicemud

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 11:45 AM

There is a substance that China Painters use called Structure Paste that is used on the surface of glazed objects to provide texture.  This can be applied to the surface of a fired piece and used (before it dries) as "glue" for pieces of glass.  The piece is then fired to around 015 - 018.  I'm sure that the finished piece would not be considered food safe but it can be a very effective addition to ornamental pieces, the outside of vases etc.  Check the gallery Marci Blattenbergers web site, she uses this technique frequently.

 

Joan



#24 celica

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Posted 22 April 2014 - 06:41 PM

that is so useful, I cant wait now to give it a go.



#25 kcompton@usitexas.com

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 12:20 PM

I make spoon rests (small, flat dishes) and melt various bottle glass in them; at cone 6  Brown beer bottles are generally too dark (Shiner seems a little lighter than average), but green generally works great and wine bottles have a whole spectrum of colors.  A couple of notes:

 

1:  It's gonna crackle.  Pretty, but not particularly food-safe.  I wouldn't use if for anything you're going to eat out of.

2:  The inbound color is not necessarily what you end up with.  Sometimes it changes substantially; I saw this a lot with the little glass floral marbles, less so with bottle glass, which is one reason I switched..

3:  Everything I've tried at cone 6 melts pretty thoroughly.  I break up the bottles in a metal bucket with a sledghammer used vertically and get the pieces to under 1/2".  Wear safety glasses and gloves!!!  I store the glass in jars and just pour an appropriate amount from the jar into the piece.  Bigger pieces iof glass are more dangerous, but they all melt into a puddle.

4:  Don't overfill your piece.  Glass on your shelves is bad, very bad, m'kay?.

5:  I generally use a glaze under the glass, usually white.  The glass doeesn't seem to wet the bare clay as well and you can end up with irregular edges to your puddle, which is less attractive.

6:  Using clear glass with a strongly colored glaze underneath can be interesting.  The glass can pick up colorant from the glaze; cobalt is a good example.

7:  Texture under the glass looks great.  Spirals, concentric circles, etc show up well and look great; I generally shoot for about an eighth of an inch deptth.



#26 rakukuku

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 12:37 PM

Steven Branfman (sp?)  puts glass into the outside of thrown pieces and then raku's them.  He tells how in his book on raku. cool stuff.   rakuku



#27 Stephen

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 12:44 PM

I would strongly recommend contacting the art glass companies b4 using on anything other than Raku and even then adjust how I used it. I have been told their glass is not compatible and even though it may appear to fit it is likely to fail over time and of course if its in any type of utility use that could/would be dangerous. 

 

I don't usually get caught up in these debates but since the glass companies themselves advise against it even though they stand the most to gain convinces me to listen. I would hate for something I made cause someone a problem or even harm down the road.


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#28 florence w

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Posted 09 September 2015 - 12:22 PM

After experimenting with various types of stained glass in the bottom of small heart shaped ring keepers dishes, I've found that many times the glaze under the glass would off gas and cause a bubble or black round spot but no glass on that black spot and/or around the edge of the glass there would be a black ring.  Both very unsightly to my eye.  Recently I've had better results by waxing the area were I want glass, glaze the piece, clean up the waxed area, crush the glass* (or not) being careful to estimate how much glass would cover the wax but not the glazed area.  I have also found that using clear colored glass is preferable to using a glass with mixed colors as the mixed colored glass turn muddy after melting.  The best glass colors I've used are blue or green.  Red glass usually turns an ugly brown.  I've had the best luck using Standard 181 clay or Little Loafers.  All the glazes are made in the studio.  The studio fires to cone 6 with no deviation from that schedule.  I'm most pleased with the glass when it crackles.  Hope this helps.  Experiment and repeat!

 

*Glass crushers are available on stained glass supply web sites or make one using various sizes of metal pipe and end caps to crush the glass inside the largest capped pipe with the smaller capped pipe hammering down the glass inside.  Please do wear eye protection! 



#29 potterbeth

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 07:52 AM

A number of my students have experimented with adding glass to their work at cone 6 electric.

 

First, unless you are firing to VERY low cones, most common glass will melt entirely and flow to the lowest point it can reach. Experiment only on the interiors of test pots first...unless you want to replace kiln shelves for the studio....

 

Second, less is often more. Experiment by beginning with small quantities of glass (just enough to cover the bottom of a piece), then increase to gauge results.

 

Third, real glass beads from the craft store are another source to explore. But they are very light and roll around. If you use glass that can roll, it is helpful to glue it in place to make it easier for the person loading the kiln. Just regular glue, like Elmer's, which will burn off long before anything starts melting...not an option to hold the glass where you want it for the entire firing.



#30 Stephen

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Posted 11 September 2015 - 03:57 PM

But even though all looks like it works perfectly and u love the effect, according to at least one large art glass company it will very likely separate eventually. I was told the properties of art glass and pottery clay are not compatible and fusing the two will not work long term and they strongly recommend against it.



#31 Diesel Clay

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Posted 12 September 2015 - 11:19 AM

Working with glass slumping/fusing and working with clay, while involving the same equipment and certain principles, are actually 2 different skill sets.
Glass begins to melt and move at MUCH lower temperatures than glazes and clay do. Think cone 018 and lower. Plus it needs to be eased through more phase changes, both when going up in temperature and back down to remain a true glass. If people are taking glass up to cone 6, or even 06, the glass is wildly overtired. Also, unless you are programming some specific ramp holds on the way down, it's not annealed properly either. This is what will cause the shivering off, colour changes in series 96 stained glass, and all that bubbling.
If you want glass/pottery combinations to be lasting, I would suggest doing the glass fusing as a third firing on glazed pottery, or a second firing onto clay fired to maturity. I strongly advocate looking up proper heating and annealing cycles for glass slumping.

#32 LinR

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 07:48 PM

I've used green, clear, brown and blue bottle glass in the bottom of small dishes which are then clearly marked NOT FOR FOOD!  The glass will craze and bubble and sometimes if it is too thick it will split the pot.  So it is fun for decorative pieces but not for functional.  You can use glass on the outside of a piece.  Small shards of coloured glass impressed into the clay will survive the bisque and will run down the outside of a cone 6 piece.  Make sure that the shards are close to the top or you will have glass on your shelves







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Glass, Bowls, Kiln, Clay, Firing, Bowl, Trimming, Mug, Vase, Glaze

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