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Darcy Kane

Standard 266

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So I have joined the journey from ^10 to ^6.  So far so good with the porcelain but today I tried Standard 266 and my goodness that stuff is D A R K.  All I could think of as I was throwing it was what a pain it was going to be to clean and that I should be making flower pots  :)  It throws nicely and I like working with it, but it leaves me wondering what glaze I will use on it.  Anyone that has used it, does it bleed through glazes? Does it look good with clear over it?  Anyone care to weigh in?  

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I love 266 it's a dream to,work,with.

 

Some of my best finishes include: slip decorated (hakame-ish)then clear, my cone 6 shino (ish),

just clear. I used a translucent dark green.very sexy!

 

I've even grog it up for more flavor

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2606-yunomi/

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2525-small-plate/

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2603-yunomi/

 

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/gallery/image/2602-bowl/

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I enjoy using Standard 266 as well! Had to change my Bisque speed to slow(Skutt digital) to allow out gassing which had created bloats in previous pieces in the glaze firing. After that change, there seems to be no problem with bloating. Here is one of my pieces and one of the glazes I use.

Yunomi & Bowl-Opulence White gloss

 

I have also used:

-Standard 1194-Bright Red Gloss

-Opulence Antique Iron

Trying to upload these images as well. ;(. But can't at the moment. I will try again.

post-19697-0-59983500-1396786929_thumb.jpg

post-19697-0-59983500-1396786929_thumb.jpg

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I haven' used the 266 but use the 211-hazelnut brown. With this one I am using more white slip and working with Oatmeal and white glazes. I am looking at trying some iron red glazes on it as I think they may be stunning Iron red reactive. Only experimenting will tell.

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It is a total nightmare to clean up. Once you think things are clean, a film of red will form as they dry, over and over and over. But it's a dream to throw and beautiful when done. Just be aware that it is not typical of most cone 6 clays in regard to glazes. Lots of testing is in order. That clay can do nasty things to some glazes. In my studio we tend to use it raw a lot, with just a liner glaze.

Darcy Kane likes this

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We were just talking about 266 the other day at our local pottery meeting -- the studio started doing bisque firing at ^05 rather than ^06 because otherwise the 266 would bloat during the ^6 firing. The hotter bisque prevents the bloating.

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We were just talking about 266 the other day at our local pottery meeting -- the studio started doing bisque firing at ^05 rather than ^06 because otherwise the 266 would bloat during the ^6 firing. The hotter bisque prevents the bloating.

 

I bisque at 04 and still get bloating at 6. I never fire it past 5.

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Personally I am done with it after I work up this 50 pounds.  What a mess and I'm not a messy thrower.  I had to scrub everything off so I could use my space again.  Oh well, every day is a new adventure.  I guess for now I will stick to the Standard 365 that reminds me of the Hampton River clam flats on a hot day in July  :)

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I've enjoyed the 266 along with the others who replied. Yes, it is difficult going from 266 to a white clay - the cleanup is never thorough enough! 

 

I would recommend testing a few pieces first; my experience with throwing mugs ended up with several shrinking so much that they turned into "espresso cups".... I glazed with Potter's Choice inside and halfway down the outside and handle....left the lower half outside unglazed since the clay cooks to a handsome dark brown.

 

post-21986-0-97453200-1396965959_thumb.jpg

post-21986-0-97453200-1396965959_thumb.jpg

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I have gone through phases of using 266 extensively.  The comments about testing glazes are spot on.  It does some weird stuff.  I find bright blues and shinos do well with it.  I have an oatmeal glaze that turns a nasty burnt blue over 266.  I also use it without glaze as someone mentioned, since it's so nice bare.

 

I appreciate the comments about the bisque firing; I've had some bloat bubbles and hadn't experimented enough to figure out why.

 

Edited because I forgot to add that I usually use a lighter brown clay after using 266 before I use any white clay.  And boy does it turn your hands and fingernails orange for a few days!

Stellaria likes this

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I've been wanting to try this stuff for months now, but when I went to my supplier to get some the last time, he was out, and I haven't had a chance to go back yet. I'm glad I got a chance to read some of your experiences with it beforehand, now!

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I love this clay to

But I'm nervous using. Because people here scared me out of it due to the manganese dioxide dangers......

 

I've discussed this with the techs at Standard. The percentage of manganese is low enough that it passes non-toxic certification for the raw clay. If I remember right it's around 2%. As long as you're smart about dust and kiln venting you shouldn't need to worry. You're much more likely to be inhaling silica dust than manganese dust.

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Neil I love throwing the 112. It is a great throwing clay, and the specks are good under almost any glaze. However, I ordered the 225 for school, as I did not want the school clay and my clay to be the same. The school clay(225) did not have the manganese, but was essentially the 112. Both throw extremely well and look good under most glazes. As to vitrification, they are both ^4-6 have 12.5% shrinkage and 2.5 absorption at ^6. A little high by some standards, but they have never acted poorly and I have mugs that have gone through numerous dishwasher loads and still holding up very well.

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112 & 225 act and look a lot like a high fire stoneware body. light tan in color, decent glaze response, and great to throw or hand build with. I used the 225 with my beginning classes and the level 2 throwing classes. Works well for most everything.

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I didn't like the 112 for throwing...only clay i have ever used that cut my hand (not roughed up but actually made little slices while centering) but it makes lovely handbuilt pots. 266 is so pretty without glaze i've yet to glaze it, i haven't thrown with it but it is great for more sculptural bare clay vessels and my bonsai pot workshop loved it. I use 259 for my usual throwing, and 240 for when i need white tho 181 and 182 are nice whites too.

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I didn't like the 112 for throwing...only clay i have ever used that cut my hand (not roughed up but actually made little slices while centering) but it makes lovely handbuilt pots. 266 is so pretty without glaze i've yet to glaze it, i haven't thrown with it but it is great for more sculptural bare clay vessels and my bonsai pot workshop loved it. I use 259 for my usual throwing, and 240 for when i need white tho 181 and 182 are nice whites too.

Interesting. I wouldn't call 112 a heavily grogged clay. Just goes to show that everyone has their own preferences!

 

240 is nice stuff, but can have S-crack issues if you don't compress the bottom well. Throws nice. 181 and 182 are both cone 10 clays, so not ideal for cone 6 work. 630 is the cone 6 version of 182. 240 is similar to 181, but I think the 240 throws a lot better and is made for cone 6.

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I finally got around to firing the 266 and it is a shame that it is such a pain to clean up because I really like how the glaze worked on the dark clay body.  Also, I fired to cone 5 with no bloating.  Great stuff if you don't mind the mess.

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The 211 Hazelnut  is  messy, but one of my favorite clays.

You could try dedicating equipment to those dark clays, it makes clean up a whole lot simpler.

I keep some batts, buckets, aprons, rags and wood tools just for the Hazelnut. I have a sheet of tempered masonite that I clamp to the wedging table to work on. This reduces contamination, but the 211 still finds it's way to white stuff.

 

Yesterday I picked up a box of the 630. The box must have been recently made it's really soft.

I'm looking forward to testing it and seeing how it compares to the 240 and the other cone 6 clays.

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