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Surface-Mixed Burner.


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#1 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 10:02 PM

Anybody ever used one in a kiln? Only ever seen pre-mixed burners.


                                                                                                                 1384226_215924051918490_1181728069_n.jpg


#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:24 PM

not sure what you mean.
Marcia

#3 JBaymore

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 12:50 PM

Sweet stuff, that industrial components.  Is the one you are talking about a North American unit?  High velocity?

 

You are getting into expensive territory.

 

What are you thinking?

 

best,

 

..................john


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#4 JLowes

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 12:50 PM

In the surface mix burners I have seen, you have a fuel source and a oxidizing source that mix and burn from the tip, so that would not be practical for a larger kiln, I would think.  A powered burner, although pre-mixed, comes close.

 

John



#5 JBaymore

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 12:52 PM

Surface mix.. if being used in the exact sense is not really for "furnaces". I am assuming that he is talking about "nozzle mixing" burners....which are technically a type of "surface mix".

 

Nozzle mixing and high velocity are used all the time on industrial applications.  Typically too "pricey" for us.

 

best,

 

................john


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#6 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 01:37 PM

I am not really sure what I am on about  :blink:

 

I was doing my usual late night binge on youtube and came across this video and fell slightly inlove with that flame. It looked like they were used for glass but thought I would start a little discussion and see if other people had come into contact with this type of burner.

 

Here is the video

https://www.youtube....h?v=aDneKjR_zdM


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#7 neilestrick

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 05:04 PM

That is a beautiful flame. One of the big differences between those and the burners we use is that they are mixing with oxygen, not air, hence the beautiful flame. That's common for glass torches.

 

I'm confused as to why it matters if the mixing happens at the nozzle or before the nozzle. Either way the flame is on the outside of the nozzle, not in the burner pipe, so why does it matter? With a power burner, a longer burner pipe provides better mixing and a nicer flame. For the burners I've built, an 8" long tube was the minimum to get good mixing. Enlighten us, John.


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#8 JBaymore

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 07:34 PM

High velocity nozzle mixing burners are what is mainly utilized in industry these days.  The deisgn allows for the multiple hundreds of mph flame ejection and remaining stable.  And alsdo for the huge turndown and ratio ability.

 

Because of the incredible load penetration of the combustion effluent, they provide exceptional disbursion of the hot gasesd and thereby provide incredible evenness of temperature distribution, reduce thermal lag into the ceenteral stackings, and almost take any kiln construction geometry out of the equiation (shamber shape almost does not matter anymore).

 

Sounds too good to be true.  In a sense for us... it is.  The technology needed to "drive" these puppies places them in a price range that almost no "stuidio potter" (or even most institutions) would consider.  Makes stuff from places like marc Ward look like toys.... and freebies.

 

The old "Kilnn" unit uses a single one of the cheapest of these high velocity burners down fired from a top rear corner for the whole combuusition system on about a 60 cubic foot kiln.  WAY ahead of its time for studio potters... and failed due to high cost an d too "slick" technology for the average potter.  They were NICE units. 

 

http://www.eclipsene...x?id=2147496845

 
 
best,
 
..................john

John Baymore
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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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