Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Mixing Mason Stains


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Nichols

Nichols

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 09:52 AM

I have 5 gallons mixed low fire clear glaze and I have a dark red mason stain dry. Can I mix the dry mason stain with the wet clear glaze to make a red glaze and if so how much of the dry mason stain do I use? People are telling me 10-30%, but I don't understand any of that because I'm mixing dry with wet and I'm new at it. Please help, I would really appreciate it.

#2 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:03 AM

I would look at your recipe. If you have a high per centage of frit, I'd say you have 10,000 grams. If you have feldspar you might be more in the ball park of 9,000 grams for the 5 gallons. It really depends on the density of dry ingredients, how much dry mix you used. Did you mix this yourself? If so, then you know how many grams you used.
I just mixed a nice red with deep crimson Mason stain and got a great red using 10% I may try 8% next time. You certainly don't need anything higher than 10%. If you were mixing an underglaze stain it could go up to 25% but not for a glaze colorant. If you don't know how much dry is in there, take a 8 ox plastic cup, put 1 1/2 inches of glaze in it and call that 50 grams of dry with water. Then measure out 4 grams..8% of your stain, add to the glaze, sift it, and test fire it. That should give you a good visual for estimating.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#3 Nichols

Nichols

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 14 November 2010 - 10:12 AM

Thank you I will try this. I really appreciate it. I did not mix this myself. I bought it from continental clay company.

#4 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 14 November 2010 - 11:35 AM

Reference codes for deep crimson are 3,5,9
3= high fire 2380 F
5= don't use with zinc
9= glaze should contain 6.7%-8.4% calcium

The ^6 glaze i used fit the above description. Red was very nice at 10% and I may try to tweek it with 8% stain and a dash of iron,
Call continental and ask them if the glaze contains zinc and what is the calcium content. They won't give you the exact recipe maybe, but they should be able to tell you that much.
Best to try a small test to see how the stain reacts to the base glaze. It would be very costly not to do a test and to have a bad result.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#5 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 14 November 2010 - 01:22 PM

I just posted the recipe I was referring to. A ^6 Ox. red.
There is a jpg on my gallery in the album Forum Discussion
.This is using 10% deep crimson Mason stain in a glaze altered by Ron Roy for Sue Hintz Version#2 ^6 OXIDATION
Cornwall Stone 33.5
G200 22
Whiting 18
Ger. Borate 10
EPK 5.5
Silica 11
Bentonite 2

Deep Crimson 10%

Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#6 ~janie

~janie

    ~janie

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 103 posts
  • LocationHot old Texas Coast

Posted 15 November 2010 - 08:27 PM

I know we are discussing red as the colorant, but can you use another color? Blue, for instance, or chartruse?

Thanks for the recipe, I really appreciate it.

~janie

#7 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 16 November 2010 - 08:48 AM

Yes but you need to know the glaze composition and the reference codes for each stain.
Google mason Stains and find the reference code chart for a started. Then find out if there is zinc in the glaze and what % of Calcium.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#8 TheSmartCat

TheSmartCat

    TheSmartCat

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 32 posts
  • LocationSouthern Rhode Island

Posted 19 November 2010 - 03:07 PM

Also when mixing mason stains remember that different stains need to be used in different amounts. Blues are *very* strong and need to be used in smaller percentages than say yellows.

#9 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 27 November 2010 - 09:42 AM

It is always best to test. I use gradations of color by reducing the percentages. I can go from 12% of greens to 6% to 3% or less of a decrease . I use less for Black which is very strong.
As smart Cat says..not all stains are created equal. You need to test and you need to know the glaze base ingredients in regards to the reference codes.
Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#10 AnneLPA

AnneLPA

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 29 November 2010 - 08:00 PM

Here is a similar question. Part 1 Is it advisable to mix a mason stain with a slip prepared from white stoneware from Great Lakes Clay? (I am thinking dry stain with wet clay) I have very limited resources for glaze chemistry but would like to see if I can use a selection of colored slips on greenware then add a clear commercial glaze over that. Electric kiln firing. Part 2: can this be raw firing, that is add the colored slip and the clear glaze and once fire it?

thanks,

AnneLPA

#11 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:16 AM

Here is a similar question. Part 1 Is it advisable to mix a mason stain with a slip prepared from white stoneware from Great Lakes Clay? (I am thinking dry stain with wet clay) I have very limited resources for glaze chemistry but would like to see if I can use a selection of colored slips on greenware then add a clear commercial glaze over that. Electric kiln firing. Part 2: can this be raw firing, that is add the colored slip and the clear glaze and once fire it?

thanks,

AnneLPA


Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com

#12 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,608 posts
  • LocationRed Lodge, Montana

Posted 30 November 2010 - 07:25 AM

As long as the slip fits , it should not be a problem. Test. Also check the reference codes before mixing. You can find them online at the mason Stain website. Here is a reference chart from the Big Ceramics Store. http://www.bigcerami...n-reference.htm
#1 reference code is : can be used as a body stain.
Then check your stain reference codes: http://www.masoncolo...ic_RefGuide.asp
Example:
6021 dark red codes are 1,3,6
6003 Crimson codes are 3,5,9
The "1" means the dark red can be used as a body stain as in slip, the crimson can not.

Marcia
Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,Montana State University-Billings
[http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users