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Underglaze Over The Top Of Glaze


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#1 Chilly

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 12:20 PM

Applying underglaze over the top of glaze.  There were some comments a week of so ago about doing this and it seemed the opinion was "don't do it, it won't work".

 

Here are two mugs, with a ^6 white glossy glaze and stencilled over the glaze is Amaco Velvet underglaze.  The effect is exactly what I wanted.  Not solid, but stippled.  The file size makes them look much worse than they really are.

 

And these two didn't crack.  They are for Essex Young Farmers to sell for their own funds or to help with #Forageaid for the flooded Somerset Levels.  Now I know it works, I've got to make a whole load more.

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#2 Pres

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 12:52 PM

I have always used underglaze over a white or off white glaze for my decoration. When doing this technique underglaze or stain over glaze, it is known as inglaze. Where you need to worry is if you underglaze does not become part of the glaze surface where food or drink comes in contact with the surface. Obviously you have left the inside of the mugs without decoration, so no problem in my humble opinion.


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#3 JLowes

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 03:38 PM

It's not as much it won't work (obviously it did) as success is harder to come by with some methods.  Underglazes generally have a good bit of clay in the makeup, and clay on top of glaze can cause issues.  In the case of Amaco Velvets, those have fluxes in the mix such that they have a better melt, which probably helped.  You can use Velvets as a finished surface, but the instructions for use only recommend this on decorative, non-food bearing surfaces.

 

I like what I see of the effect; too bad the picture wasn't a bit larger for a close-up look.

 

John



#4 AWPottery

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 05:03 PM

Chilly- thanks for this post.  I was the one asking about this awhile back.  I was also told that to make the underglaze stick better to the glaze if painting it on top of it, mix a little bit of the glaze you are using with the underglaze.  Is this correct?



#5 AWPottery

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 05:07 PM

Oh, and also I was wondering how many coats of the underglaze did you apply on top of the glaze?



#6 perkolator

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 05:16 PM

very common technique I'd say.  Look up "Majolica".

Doesn't always have 100% success - really depends on the UG color and the glaze underneath it.  We've had best success with the Amaco Velvet UGs combined with a nice fat white glaze underneath.  Certain UGs, like greens with chrome in them, don't flux out quite as well because of the chrome content.  Application depends on desired effect - usually one heavy coat or 2-3 looser coats should do the trick.



#7 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 20 March 2014 - 06:31 PM

I want a better file size  :(

 

Never tried underglazes but I used equal volumes China Clay, Gerstley Borate and Iron Oxide with about 2-3% Bentonite in the hope of something. 

 

Needs some work as it blurs into the glaze a little and runs when over my blue slip.

 

Bisque, glazed then painted.

Attached File  overglaze.jpg   73.82KB   0 downloads


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#8 Chilly

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 09:49 AM

AW - I just used a small piece of "washing-up-sponge" and loaded it with UG, then dabbed onto the glaze through the paper stencil until I got "enough" on .......  I'm happy with results.  Holding a paper stencil still on a round mug is fun - had to wipe rubber-gloved-left-thumb clean every time, before picking up next stencil/turning mug round.  I'd say it was a light coat, and in some places very light <_<

 

High Bridge - Bigger file is on my website :)  - see my signature below -


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