Jump to content


Photo

What Has Been Your Worst Re Encounter Of A Piece Of Your Pottery?


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#21 Rebekah Krieger

Rebekah Krieger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 485 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 25 March 2014 - 08:53 AM

I love that! 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#22 karenm54

karenm54

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • LocationIndependence OR

Posted 07 April 2014 - 01:02 PM

in a workshop with phil rogers past work came up. he said that as long as someone enjoyed the pot, let them. that, as someone earlier in the thread said, by diminishing what they enjoy you are diminishing them in a way. if they found something to enjoy in the pot, that something is still there, no matter how your skills have progressed. it makes sense, but i couldn't help but cringe when i saw an old bowl of mine on display in my mother in laws house. yikes. 

 

i've been searching for a lot of old work from school, missing somewhere for close to ten years now. my mom emailed me last week and said she found two boxes of it. one was labeled 'bad pots' and the other was 'pretty good pots'. i can't wait to see what my idea of good pots was! quite awful i'm sure! i was no natural at throwing, i see many people's first pots way nicer than my own were.



#23 Mudslinger Ceramics

Mudslinger Ceramics

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 92 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 09 April 2014 - 07:49 PM

New pots or re-found old ones,  I have recently developed a close, personal understanding with the hammer.......'let none survive!'


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri


#24 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 373 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 09 April 2014 - 10:54 PM

When I started selling my paintings I would point out every little thing I felt was wrong with a painting if someone was looking at it to buy. Then one day my husband told me to stop, he said they like the painting just the way it is so if they don't see what you think is wrong with it let them just enjoy it. Once he said that it made me think you know he's right if they love a painting enough to want to buy it who am I to tell them I think the angle on that wall or the shadow under that tree is not quite perfect. After that I learned to create the art and release it into the world to live its own life with the person that loved it enough to adopt it. I mean even ugly puppies get adopted and loved so why not art?

Terry
PS. This does not mean I don't judge and edit myself and my work I do I just don't do it after I have decided to sell or have sold it. The woulda shoulda couldas will drive you crazy.
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#25 Joy pots

Joy pots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 50 posts

Posted 10 April 2014 - 11:42 AM

A friend of mine said she exchanges the older learning pot with a newer more experienced one.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users