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Solar Powered Kiln?


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#41 Tyler Miller

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:50 AM

Curt, I advise you rethink your advice to your friend.  Heating applications and solar charged batteries do not mesh well.

 

Neil, I'm in 100% agreement with you on both points (as per my original post).

 

 To the forum in general,

 

The original thrust of my post was to disambiguate the phrase "solar powered electric kiln."  The phrasing, as it stands is misleading, since solar power alone cannot heat anything  (they may be able to provide theoretical power, but this does not work in practice), and on-grid systems are dependent on the grid to provide the power quality necessary to complete a firing.  

 

I must say, however, I'm disappointed that this discussion descended into an issue of semantics and poor math. I do not think Mr. Baymore's arguments have been in good faith.  Indeed, the ceramist in link three fires a wood fired kiln and uses solar power to offset their energy footprint.  I believe Mr. Baymore's third post underscores this poor faith behaviour.  This has, I believe, formed a pattern.  This pattern includes a series of messages not to engage in discussions with a member with whom he didn't agree with, part of his argument was "just look at the pots this guy makes!"

 

I have contacted both Mr. Baymore and the admins in the past regarding this poor behaviour.  I have great respect for his knowledge and experience, but I know many ceramists just as knowledgable and experienced, and they do not behave in such a way.  It has been because of this poor attitude that my presence on this forum has been minimal.

 

Best wishes to all,

 

Tyler



#42 Min

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 02:41 AM

 

 

 

  It has been because of this poor attitude that my presence on this forum has been minimal.

 

Best wishes to all,

 

Tyler

 

Maybe an issue that needs to be discussed is why people get disgruntled and leave these forums. The thread the other week about what people get out of these forums was a nice warm and fuzzy one but if we as a group are to grow then perhaps we need a bit of constructive criticism. I4,300 members and how many last more than a few months? 

 

Tyler, I for one have noticed your presence here has been dwindling and have missed your thought provoking discussions. 

 

Peace,

Madeleine



#43 curt

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 06:41 AM

Tyler,

 

We have never met but let me say this.

 

Thanks for being willing to comment and put yourself out there. I may or may not agree with you in this context, but I have enjoyed your insightful posts in many parts of these forums, and hope to be able to continue to benefit from your thoughts here in the future. I acknowledge and respect your concerns, and feel that you would not express them if they were not sincere.  I appreciate your providing a different view supported by your considerable experience and solid arguments. 

 

I have enough experience to know that as smart as I think I am, I am still wrong about a great many things, and that is why I am here. In life I have found that my understanding only grows when tested by others.  There is no finality, only give and take, and the inevitable progression. 



#44 Benzine

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 07:16 AM

I hate to see anyone, who contributes, to these forums, leave.

We have a lot of great, knowledgeable posters here, and it is expected, that sometimes there will be disagreements. I hope this is something we can all move past, because losing even one of those good posters hurts the forums.

Min, to address your question, I think a lot of users leave, because they are here for a "quick fix". They think they want to get into ceramics, but don't understand everything it takes. Some, upon learning more here, take a step back, and proceed a bit more cautiously, some just get turned off, by the time and effort it takes ("Are you saying my viewing of the movie 'Ghost', doesn't mean, that I can instantly start make huge, useable wares, and 'bake' them in my oven?!!! This is stupid!"), and are never heard from again.

And there are even those, who some here more than others, are familiar with, that come in just to ask questions, for no apparent reason, other than to ask questions,

Heck, there are even those who try and get free R&D out of the posters and forums!

In any case, those users don't last long, because once they see, that they aren't going to get exactly what they want, they leave.

I do think those types of posters make up the bulk, who don't return. As I initially said, it is much more concerning, when we lost a contributing poster, who has been here for some time. I hope we can move on from disagreements, and continue to make this a great place to interact/ learn.
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#45 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 01:16 PM

I still mourn the loss of Norm :( . 

 

You have taught me a lot Tyler Miller, thank you for that. I hope you can find it in you to stick around. Always love reading your posts.

 

I agree that lots of people come for an easy fix to find their question comes back with even more questions and very few definite answers.


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#46 Benzine

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 10:43 AM

Norm definitely had a lot to contribute, but he made a discussion personal, and questioned the credibility and integrity of some other posters.

That happened with another poster too, though the latter departure was less... "Volatile", I guess one could say.

I think the problem is, we as people, take any questioning/ contradicting of our knowledge, as an attack on us personally. We shouldn't. Things change, especially information. Look at History or Science/ Medicine, the "Facts" change all the time based in new discoveries. If a doctor is not up to date, that doesn't mean they are an idiot. It's our job as humans, to stay up on the changing information, so that we can continue to contribute to one another. And that's why it's sad to see such apathy, in regards to correct information by today's youth... But that's a whole other topic all together...
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#47 Dennis Bednarek

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 11:10 PM

Solar is possible today with some of the advances in solar panels.  

 

Dependent on the kiln size and power requirements some small electric ones run at under 20 Amps and 120 volts which amounts to only 2,400  Watts.  But on the other end of the spectrum the max you probably do would be a kiln running at about 30 Amps and 240 Volts or 7,200 Watts.  Now looking at the expense though Solar panels range from about $1.50 to $5.00 per Watt that they produce.  With that in mind your looking at a minimum of $3,600 for a small kiln and $11,000 for the larger kilns.  

Yes it is possible but I seriously doubt that it is economically feasible.  .  Also if you use longer firing times than 8 hours you may have issues during the night.when there is very little solar energy.  



#48 GiselleNo5

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Posted 13 May 2015 - 11:15 PM

A potter here on the Central Coast runs his huge kiln off of solar power. It's probably at least 3'x3'x5'. Not sure how many panels or what kind of power storage he has, but I could ask him if you'd like. I'm interested in doing that myself. 



#49 Mark C.

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 01:24 AM

I have always thought we all gain by diversity of thought.

I am sad when anyone leaves  the board by taking different opinions personal.

I try and not take things personal even as over the years I know a few where tossed my way.I can always feel ok that we all agree to disagree now and then.

I have noticed your absence Tyler and have missed your take on subjects recently.I always wonder about folks who vanish or never post back on subjects.

i thought folks like Norm added a lot to the forum but since its all up to each of us on how and when we use or not use the foruem there is not much we users can do if someone chooses to leave.

I think a thick skin is needed for long life here and I guess I have that even though as an old geezer my skin is thiner as one gets older (I'm taking literally here)

As an unpaid consultant I may not have the best take on this subject.

I do know as Benzine said many come for quick fixes that just cannot happen and hence they drop out.

Mark


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#50 curt

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 11:01 PM

I think it is important to remember that - for almost all of us - the question is not really "can I run my kiln off of solar panels?"  The only potters that will be asking that are probably large production houses where in fact all the power the panels could produce and then some is consumed solely in the business itself on a daily basis.

 

For the rest of us, once you have made the investment in a solar power system, and are harvesting sunlight and turning it into electricity, you use that electricity everywhere you can and don't waste any of it if at all possible.  Selling it to the grid is the least desirable course of action because the power company usually charges you a lot more for electricity you import then for the exact same electricity when you sell it to them.  When you are not using the solar system to power a kiln (the other 350 days a year) you it will  running your house, sheds, washing machines, pumps, etc. etc.  Indeed, that is the basis on which the decision for most of us will ultimately be made - can I run my house on solar power, and if so, using it occasionally for the kiln is just gravy.

 

Again, when reasonably costed batteries in adequate sizes become available to the mass market, we will need to examine the whole proposition again, because stand-along (ie, completely independent of the grid) power systems will become an unavoidable proposition.  I think that will happen in the next five years.... 



#51 Dennis Bednarek

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Posted 21 May 2015 - 09:06 AM

have you thought abut a wind mill rather than solar panels.  Then you would just have to check the weather prediction for wind speed to determine when you wanted to fire your kilns.  






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