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Glaze Waste Hazards


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:27 PM

Many studio maintain glaze "slop"/ cleaning buckets/ trash cans or barrels.

So not to contaminate/harm environment.

Some recycle the sediment. Some will fire and dispose of "glass" safely

Some send slop to hazardous waste collection, some make "bob" glaze (bottom of barrel). (Which I love)

I've seen other studios that don't recycle,or handle glaze byproduct and just use city drain.

So what chemicals in glaze are so hazardous to the environment that make recycling the slop, or safely disposing of, necessary?

How will small amounts of.... Colorants or other chemicals affect environment in small quantities, and doesn't get caught in water treatment.....?

Is it really necessary?

Do you or you studio/guild use same practice?

Is there "white paper" on this subject?
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#2 Tyler Miller

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 07:21 PM

I don't think it's all chemicals, just some.  Barium carbonate isn't fun, nor is cobalt, lead, cadium, etc.  But a ^10 copper red glaze would have the chemistry of heavy water in sandy corroded copper pipes.  A tenmoku isn't far off rusty mud, depending on where you live.

 

I'd say using the drain is poor practice no matter what, but using hazardous waste disposal is only necessary if your waste is legitimately hazardous. It's usually all in the MSDS for the materials you buy and use.



#3 JBaymore

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 07:33 PM

Part of this is actually simple:  there are EPA standards for this kid of waste disposal issue.  Ditto for State laws.  Individual waste water management districts also likely have their own regs.  Read em'. 

 

Most studios fall under the "small generator" category and as such are basically exempt.  Large production facilities might exceed the "small" category due to volume of waste.  Institutions like colleges usually are producing enough waste as to require some serious disposal.  (I used to the be the head of the H+S committee and the college H+S coordinator....... pain in the butt.)

 

Some studios are simply being illegal (knowingly or not) .... but are too 'small a potatoe' for the EPA to go after.  But if there is a complaint, then they'll likely enforce it.

 

best,

 

.....................john


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#4 JBaymore

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 07:34 PM

It's usually all in the MSDS for the materials you buy and use.

 

Which almost always says 'consult Federal, State, and local laws' for additional information.

 

best,

 

..........................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:40 PM

you could create a slop glaze and fire all the waste chemicals in a random glaze that potentially could be interesting.

Marcia

#6 neilestrick

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:22 AM

When I worked as a tech for a clay and glaze supplier, we once had to get rid of a bag of barium carb for some reason I don't remember, and the local and state laws all said there wasn't enough of it to matter, and it was close to a full 50 pound bag. So into the dumpster it went. Like John said, chances are any of the heavy metals that would cause concern probably don't exist in large enough volume in your studio to matter. Should we still do things like fire them into a glass before disposing of them? You bet. We should do what we can to make the world a safer place.


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#7 JBaymore

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 09:56 AM

Should we still do things like fire them into a glass before disposing of them? You bet. We should do what we can to make the world a safer place.

 

Simple, easy, and relatively effectve.

 

best,

 

.....................john


John Baymore
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Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

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#8 Pres

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 10:41 AM

I have fired most of my slop. I will let it dry in a bag lining a bucket, and then place some of the powder into a bisque bowl and fire with normal glaze firing. If it comes out glassy with no problems I will go a little further and try to develop it into a glaze. I have done this with larger amounts at school, just for fun. However, on occasion come up with some really nice glazes(one of a kind) that work well over or under other glazes. For me it is all a matter of play, as nothing is using limits or other glaze technology. Just guess work.


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#9 TJR

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 10:42 AM

I have a bucket in my studio for glaze washing. All dipping containers, tongs brushes etc. get rinsed in there. Having said that, I realize that I wash out my glaze sieves in the laundry sink in my basement.[so some stuff goes down the drain].

The glazes that result from this glaze rinse water are quite beautiful, and have a richness that you cannot get with the pure chemicals from the supplier. I have a Korean celadon type glaze, and a blackish, oilspot Temmoku. Of course I test these glazes before applying them to my pots. They don't usually run, but can be butt ugly occasionally. Then they get relegated to the back corner of the studio with the label; "Don't Use."

The really good slop glazes get used all the time, but then you cannot repeat the results when the bucket is empty.

TJR.






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