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clay lover

Need A Clear Satin Glaze That's Not Cloudy

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clay lover    133

Can any one help me? I have a glossy glaze that works well for me, but the satin I have is whitish, milky and dulls colors .  Do you have a ^6 satin clear that behaves well? 

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neilestrick    1,381

I've always considered a satin clear to be an oxymoron. The process that makes it satin will also tend to make it cloudy at least to some degree. There are some clear glazes that are less glossy than others, but the more matte it becomes, the cloudier it becomes. I would start with fluxing out your current glaze a little bit and see if that helps.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I posted this quite a while ago.

 

Here is the Clear ^6 I use with stains. It works really well with crimson Mason Stains. Please forgive the formatting. This is a nice smooth satin to shiny clear.

It is high in Calcium Carb, but it is the same code for crimson and it works well there.

Sue Hintz Clear 6^ reworked by Ron Roy back in late 90s.

 

 

Cornwall Stone 33.5

G200 22

Whiting 18

Gerstley Borate 10

EPKaolin 5.5

Silica 11

Bentonite 2

 

Marcia

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clay lover    133

Thanks you.  Is there something different about clears staying clear over red mason stains?  The worst problems I have had was with reds.

 

Is it more shiny when fired hotter?  Satin to shiny, what controls the amount of gloss?

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Min    778

 

Is it more shiny when fired hotter?  Satin to shiny, what controls the amount of gloss?

 

The ratio of silica to alumina plus the boron levels. Also, slow cooling with glazes, especially those high in calcium or zinc will form microcrystallization and the glaze will be semimatt or matt. Many matt or satin glazes are underfired higher firing gloss glazes that haven't been fired to maturity.

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neilestrick    1,381

 

 

Is it more shiny when fired hotter?  Satin to shiny, what controls the amount of gloss?

 

The ratio of silica to alumina plus the boron levels. Also, slow cooling with glazes high in calcium or zinc will form microcrystallization and the glaze will be semimatt or matt. Many matt or satin glazes are underfired higher firing gloss glazes that haven't been fired to maturity.

 

 

Magnesium also contributes to matteness, especially in slow cooling, and can have great scratch resistance and acid resistance.

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Min    778

 

 

 

Is it more shiny when fired hotter?  Satin to shiny, what controls the amount of gloss?

 

The ratio of silica to alumina plus the boron levels. Also, slow cooling with glazes high in calcium or zinc will form microcrystallization and the glaze will be semimatt or matt. Many matt or satin glazes are underfired higher firing gloss glazes that haven't been fired to maturity.

 

 

Magnesium also contributes to matteness, especially in slow cooling, and can have great scratch resistance and acid resistance.

 

The list should be longer, strontium, titanium dioxide etc. I guess the thing I was trying to point out was that there are a lot of variables that come into play.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

This glaze works well with red stains. the above is true for glaze calculation that mattness is determined by the ratio of alumina/Boron or the radical RO2O3 to Silica RO2 (forgive) the non-subscript.Higher temps also melt the glaze to a shinier surface. Micro crystalline matts can stay matt and run if overfired.

Check the reference codes for Mason stains. Not all are the same. If you fire a satin matt clear hotter it will get shinier depending on how hot you go.

 

Marcia

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Chilly    329

How do I edit an error in a title?  The edit button does not get me there.

You have to ask an admin to do it for you.

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clay lover    133

I fired my clear glossy and the clear satin in the same firing  on the same shelves, clear was perfect and satin was clear on some underglazes and frosty on others.  This is a satin clear I have used in the past, from the same bucket, very successfully.  It has been sitting in the back of the glaze room for 2-3 years, untouched.   Does that have anything to do with why it did not perform as well as it has in the past?

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A satin clear is pretty impossible. If you really want a nice clear and can't handle gloss, try using a gloss clear then sandblasting the fired work. If you can find a sandblaster. You might also try adding a little more gerstley borate to your current glaze.

 

Best,

Darrel

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Babs    386

Satin is never clear because of all of the above, the underglazes have different levels of clay in them and I have found a couple which affect the performance of the glaze over them. Some clears will give you a satin if applied more as a wash, ie thinner than you would usually apply your glaze but to the detriment of hte quality of hte glaze.

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flowerdry    128

I have used a commercial satin clear for quite some time with good results.  I have to be careful to not apply too thick.  It seems to work best with 2 - 3 thinly brushed coats as opposed to dipping.  It's from Campbells which is now out of business and I don't know where they got it from.

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46South    2

I posted this quite a while ago.

 

Here is the Clear ^6 I use with stains. It works really well with crimson Mason Stains. Please forgive the formatting. This is a nice smooth satin to shiny clear.

It is high in Calcium Carb, but it is the same code for crimson and it works well there.

Sue Hintz Clear 6^ reworked by Ron Roy back in late 90s.

 

 

Cornwall Stone 33.5

G200 22

Whiting 18

Gerstley Borate 10

EPKaolin 5.5

Silica 11

Bentonite 2

 

Marcia

Hi Marcia, I live in NZ and am not familiar with the ingredient G200 but guess it is a feldspar? If so which Pot. or Soda? thanks.

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Babs    386

 

I posted this quite a while ago.

 

Here is the Clear ^6 I use with stains. It works really well with crimson Mason Stains. Please forgive the formatting. This is a nice smooth satin to shiny clear.

It is high in Calcium Carb, but it is the same code for crimson and it works well there.

Sue Hintz Clear 6^ reworked by Ron Roy back in late 90s.

 

 

Cornwall Stone 33.5

G200 22

Whiting 18

Gerstley Borate 10

EPKaolin 5.5

Silica 11

Bentonite 2

 

Marcia

Hi Marcia, I live in NZ and am not familiar with the ingredient G200 but guess it is a feldspar? If so which Pot. or Soda? thanks.

 

I know  it is high in Potassium and ground thus the G. So Potash Feld. Stand to be corrected in this.

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Recently  I saw  Lisa Naples published on her Blog this  satin-matt clear glaze:

 

Frit 3134  :     40

Lithium Carb. 7

Wollastonite : 25

OM4 ( ball clay) 25

 

yelow ochre .5

black iron     .5

 

I would like to try it myself, but I am wodering if  Wollastonite can be substituted with whiting and quartz ?

Any suggestions ?

 

thanks,

marta

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Min    778

Recently  I saw  Lisa Naples published on her Blog this  satin-matt clear glaze:

 

Frit 3134  :     40

Lithium Carb. 7

Wollastonite : 25

OM4 ( ball clay) 25

 

yelow ochre .5

black iron     .5

 

I would like to try it myself, but I am wodering if  Wollastonite can be substituted with whiting and quartz ?

Any suggestions ?

 

thanks,

marta

A match of the chemistry using whiting and silica in place of wollastonite is this:

 

3134  -  36.8

Lithium Carb  -  6.4

OM 4  -  23

Whiting  -  19.3

Silica  -  11.5

Yellow Ochre  -  0.5

Black Iron Ox.  -  0.5

 

total: 98

 

The LOI is much higher, 14.74 with the whiting & silica version versus 6.65 with the wollastonite so I would expect the possibility of pinholes with this version from the whiting gassing off. Silica is low plus the alumina is a little low, it does not look like a very durable glaze. Lithium is quite high.

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Mark C.    1,798

 

I posted this quite a while ago.

Here is the Clear ^6 I use with stains. It works really well with crimson Mason Stains. Please forgive the formatting. This is a nice smooth satin to shiny clear.

It is high in Calcium Carb, but it is the same code for crimson and it works well there.

Sue Hintz Clear 6^ reworked by Ron Roy back in late 90s.

Cornwall Stone 33.5

G200 22

Whiting 18

Gerstley Borate 10

EPKaolin 5.5

Silica 11

Bentonite 2

Marcia

 

Hi Marcia, I live in NZ and am not familiar with the ingredient G200 but guess it is a feldspar? If so which Pot. or Soda? thanks.It's a potash feldspar

Mark

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