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#21 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:02 PM

Ah, I did not think about this. I do have some boiled linseed oil mixed with iron oxide left over from my photolithography attempts. Maybe that would do something...

 

Going to try hairs first I think.



#22 Babs

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:34 PM

Came across wrong High Bridge,  prob need to wash feathers in a strong detergent to remove water repellant, like they do after oil slicks.......

 

Ah, I did not think about this. I do have some boiled linseed oil mixed with iron oxide left over from my photolithography attempts. Maybe that would do something...

 

Going to try hairs first I think.



#23 bciskepottery

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:11 PM

In Chinese brush painting, some artists use a brush made of rooster feathers.

http://www.blueheron...products_id=878

#24 bciskepottery

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:20 PM

Regardless of whether you make your own or buy your brushes, proper care and storage is important to keeping them in good shape. Many folks store their brushes handle down in a cup/jar, with bristles in the air. That is not a good way to store or dry your brush as the water runs down into the ferrule. Store your brushes by hanging them from the tip of the handle. That lets the water run down when drying and it allows the bristles to keep their shape when dry and not in use.

#25 Mark C.

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:22 PM

I build a nylon string loop in top of handle when making them and hang them next to sink. I also own a bunch made by others and have added the loop with a drill and epoxy.

Mark


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#26 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 09:47 PM

Ah ok, thanks babs. I do need to start looking after my brushes better. The only one I use tends to sit in a bucket of slip 24/7 which can't be that good for it. It is a cheap brush so I don't really mind and it is not that good a brush.

 

Strings and loops sound like the best idea, did not know keeping them upside down is a bad idea.  :o



#27 Babs

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 10:53 PM

In Chinese brush painting, some artists use a brush made of rooster feathers.

http://www.blueheron...products_id=878

I have 6 roosters ready for the annual cull.... I am now having no remorse about this!

Come to think of it  roosters are not known for standing out in the rain so perhaps the water repellant properties are limited to water birds.

Now I just know that some one is going to post about swan down brushes.

The goat hair could prob be source d from a spinner or dairy farm.



#28 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 01:30 AM

What about human hair? I have a lovely head of hair that could be made into many brushes  ^_^ It is a little too curly though.



#29 Babs

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:57 AM

No Prob. In the sixties we used to iron our hair straight.



#30 Babs

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 02:58 AM

I build a nylon string loop in top of handle when making them and hang them next to sink. I also own a bunch made by others and have added the loop with a drill and epoxy.

Mark

MArk what glue do you use to  keep them in the bamboo? DO you bind the fibres  then glue the brush in?



#31 Benzine

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 08:39 AM

What about human hair? I have a lovely head of hair that could be made into many brushes  ^_^ It is a little too curly though.


But if you get the hair from someone else, you might have to check for ticks and mites, like with the animal hair......hehe...
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#32 Mark C.

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Posted 01 March 2014 - 12:29 PM

I wrap the hairs with nylon heavy thread so it's rot resistant as well as covering the ends and glueing it into bamboo with slow set JB wield epoxy.

I have used many a poorly constructed brush that was not made right thats come apart and then repaired

I has also used west system epoxy which is a marine  two part deal.

I have 5-8 types of bamboo  patches around our property for handles some is over 20 feet some smaller-you can buy dried bamboo at garden centers-I used to use it in water fountains as well.

Mark


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#33 Babs

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 01:10 AM

thanks Mark



#34 Mart

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 06:27 AM

Regardless of whether you make your own or buy your brushes, proper care and storage is important to keeping them in good shape. Many folks store their brushes handle down in a cup/jar, with bristles in the air. That is not a good way to store or dry your brush as the water runs down into the ferrule. Store your brushes by hanging them from the tip of the handle. That lets the water run down when drying and it allows the bristles to keep their shape when dry and not in use.

 

+1

As mentioned before, use cheep stuff for wax (personally never used wax) and good stuff for painting lines etc.

Natural hair (dog, squirrel, sable, ox ear, pony etc) watercolour brushes are the best. For a really fine lines, I actually use really thick (>10) but fine tipped brush.

 

Forget the synthetic bristles. Yes, some of those will soak up paint/gaze well but will not let it go so well as natural hair does.

I got myself few Escoda pony hair round oval shape brushes with short handle. Wow... I wish I had the money to buy more of those :)

They will probably last for a long time.

 

To be honest, covering large areas with brush is, simply put, BS and I like to avoid it if possible. Pouring, dipping, throwing o_O or what ever you can come up with, will give better results. I wish I had a spray booth :)



#35 Nancy S.

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 09:36 AM

 

Your bleeding along the edges may be from the interaction of the oxide wash with the glaze.

Two cautions about roadkill as brush sources: fleas and ticks. If you recycle, then treat for fleas and ticks before handling and using.

And then there are viruses.... rabies,  hantavirus, etc.   

 

 

Actually, rabies would NOT be an issue if the roadkill has been dead long enough to cool down. Rabies is very temperature-sensitive; plus, it's usually carried in the saliva and the spinal fluids, so blood-to-wound transmission is extremely rare even if it's still warm.

 

Hantavirus is carried in the droppings of mice and rats; I wouldn't use their fur anyway, since it is so short and harder to bind to a handle.

 

Fleas and ticks usually leave a carcass when there isn't any blood flowing, because they have nothing to eat.

 

Still, that doesn't mean that roadkill is sanitary, and I don't know if I'd endorse using it.....wear gloves, wash it, and dry it thoroughly.



#36 Babs

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 01:07 AM

only here would a simple question re. brushes develop into discussion which has me thinking that I'd better not venture outdoors for fear of the unknown dangers lurking everywhere..



#37 mss

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 02:05 PM

Having worked with rabies, I would not recommend handling any dead animal without gloves.  (Yes, there are other, more stable viruses, but see here re rabies:  http://www.dec.ny.go...als/32131.html)



#38 Babs

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 03:25 AM

THAT'S IT i'M  staying indoors! Something may fall on me from on high!

Is rabies widespread in the US or just among the potlickers?



#39 bciskepottery

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 06:46 AM

I guess many potters are rabid, er avid . . . but I've not seen any foaming at the mouth. Drooling over really good forms, glazes, and kilns -- yes; but not foaming.

#40 mss

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 01:58 PM

Since you're interested, rabies in wildlife, from the CDC:

Wild animals accounted for 92% of reported cases of rabies in 2010. Raccoons continued to be the most frequently reported rabid wildlife species (36.5% of all animal cases during 2010), followed by skunks (23.5%), bats (23.2%), foxes (7.0%), and other wild animals, including rodents and lagomorphs (1.8%). Reported cases decreased among all wild animals during 2010.

Outbreaks of rabies infections in terrestrial mammals like raccoons, skunks, foxes, and coyotes are found in broad geographic regions across the United States.

Great map here:http://www.cdc.gov/r...ld_animals.html

And in dogs & cats:  http://www.cdc.gov/r...s-and-dogs.html






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