Jump to content


Photo

Clay & Glaze Info Recommendations


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 jammy43

jammy43

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts

Posted 25 February 2014 - 10:03 PM

I'm starting my home hobby studio, after 9 years in a community studio.  Anybody have an recommendations on must have resources for the beginner?  I've experimented with glaze making but have never made my own clay.  

 

Also looking for recommendations on the best bats>



#2 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,120 posts

Posted 26 February 2014 - 02:37 AM

Try the topisc in this forum posted by Rebekah  ,there is a PDF from Neil that has a list for glaze makers.



#3 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,805 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 26 February 2014 - 10:29 AM

http://community.cer...your-own-glaze/


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#4 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,558 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:41 PM

When I asked my first instructor about getting a wheel for home use, she advised me that the first piece of equipment to buy was a kiln . . . which would allow me to fire either hand-built or wheel-thrown wares. Unless you plan to use the community studio for firing, think about a kiln. As for clay, I'd suggest using commercial clay, especially if you've not made your own clay before and don't have the equipment for mixing/pugging clay made from scratch. Making your own is neat; but it takes time and testing. Might make more sense to use commercial until you are ready for that type of jump and commitment. Home-made glazes are cheaper than commercial, but you will need to invest up front in glaze making gear. I mostly use home-made glazes. Start with a book or two on glaze making -- a much recommended book is Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by John Hesselberth and Ron Roy (available in b/w version, ebook on ipad) -- great basic info on glazes and a great set of recipes to mix. Start with a couple basic recipes rather than overcommit yourself to ones that don't get used. I'd also suggest a good pottery reference book . . . Hamer/Hamer's The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques (expensive) or Harry Fraser's Ceramic Faults and their remedies (more affordable).

You might get more suggestions if we knew what type of wares you want to make, firing range (low fire, Cone 6, Cone 10), reduction or oxidation atmosphere, etc. and a bit about your skill level. Are you looking for tools? equipment? books? etc.

#5 jammy43

jammy43

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts

Posted 28 February 2014 - 12:11 PM

When I asked my first instructor about getting a wheel for home use, she advised me that the first piece of equipment to buy was a kiln . . . which would allow me to fire either hand-built or wheel-thrown wares. Unless you plan to use the community studio for firing, think about a kiln. As for clay, I'd suggest using commercial clay, especially if you've not made your own clay before and don't have the equipment for mixing/pugging clay made from scratch. Making your own is neat; but it takes time and testing. Might make more sense to use commercial until you are ready for that type of jump and commitment. Home-made glazes are cheaper than commercial, but you will need to invest up front in glaze making gear. I mostly use home-made glazes. Start with a book or two on glaze making -- a much recommended book is Mastering Cone 6 Glazes by John Hesselberth and Ron Roy (available in b/w version, ebook on ipad) -- great basic info on glazes and a great set of recipes to mix. Start with a couple basic recipes rather than overcommit yourself to ones that don't get used. I'd also suggest a good pottery reference book . . . Hamer/Hamer's The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques (expensive) or Harry Fraser's Ceramic Faults and their remedies (more affordable).

You might get more suggestions if we knew what type of wares you want to make, firing range (low fire, Cone 6, Cone 10), reduction or oxidation atmosphere, etc. and a bit about your skill level. Are you looking for tools? equipment? books? etc.

Thanks so much for the info - yes a Kiln will be my first real purchase ( already have my work table and shelves, as ive been handbuilding at home for a while now).  Currently i use low fire earthenware , as that is what is used by my community studio, but i plan on switching back to mid-fire porcelain and stoneware. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users