Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Sanding Cone 10 Bisqueware?


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 minaa

minaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 06:52 PM

http://ceramicartsda...azing-ceramics/

 

Hello, I am taking a class in ceramics right now (woohoo!) and this artist mentions sanding her bisqueware. We work with cone 10 clay, and I was wondering, will this technique still apply (yay newb questions)? I'd like to get my pieces nice and smooth.

 

Thanks!



#2 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,419 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:07 PM

Any sanding should be done outside and away from where the silica dust could be inhaled by anyone else in the studio or tracked back into the studio. And, if you sand, be sure to where an appropriate breathing respirator (P-100 rated) to protect your lungs from silica dust. Smoothing your surfaces while leather hard with a soft rib is preferable since it does not raise silica dust. Or, use a wet sanding approach that minimizes (but does not completely eliminate) silica dust becoming air borne. Smooth is nice; healthy lungs and being able to breath is nicer.

http://www.3m.com/pr...Respirator.html or something similar. But rated P100 or it does not capture the fine dust.

#3 minaa

minaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:26 PM

I currently have a P-95 respirator. Should I bother to go up to the next level (this really depends on the particulate, so I'm curious. The P-95 was primarily for resin sanding)? And, I'd probably be good to pick up some goggles, I suspect.



#4 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,419 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:37 PM

You'll really want P100. Here is a link to good info on safety, dust, and respirators. http://iweb.tntech.e...elka/safety.htm

There are also good threads on the forum about this issue.

#5 minaa

minaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 24 February 2014 - 07:45 PM

Thanks for the info. Apart from just getting wet-dry sand paper, should I consider any specific grits? I've ordered some goggles and a respirator (not too expensive, really), so I can work on this in the next week or two.



#6 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,524 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:35 PM

If you take care of it all during throwing and trimming, there shouldn't be any need to sand. It just creates a health hazard.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#7 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,419 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:27 PM

Probably 100 to 200 grit should work.

#8 Colby Charpentier

Colby Charpentier

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 150 posts
  • LocationProvidence, RI

Posted 24 February 2014 - 11:06 PM

I have different grit preferences depending on which bodies I am sanding. For a small-particle porcelain, I can't go less than 150 grit without instigating blemishes in the final product. With the stoneware I use, I can go as coarse as 80 grit. Take note that sanding for high-fire applications isn't as effective, as high-fire clay bodies will tend to flux and resultantly change their surface due to the shrinkage. I do agree with other posts here that there is a health hazard, however, in order to meet the standards that I hold for certain lines of work, I find sanding to be integral to creating flawless surfaces. Also, I am generally sanding surfaces that will tend to remain bare at the end of the firing, so there's no relying on glazes or otherwise to average out the defects. I tend to do a post-fire sanding for this type of work in addition to the bisque sanding.



#9 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,746 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:23 AM

I suggest wet sponging the green ware-no dust and can smooth the bottoms very well. 

For all grinding or sanding use a mask

If you must grind a dimond pad after cone 10 fire-less dust

If its stoneware fire to cone 10 and use a brass wire wheel on fixed bench grinder-very smooth no dust

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#10 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,840 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:49 AM

I agree with Mark, wet sponging the greenware is faster and no dust. I use a steel rib while the pot is still of the wheel.

Marcia

#11 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,154 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 25 February 2014 - 10:53 AM

I have to sand my work at bisque and after high firing. In order to reduce dust problems I sand with the pieces held over a bucket of water so the dust falls in the water and stays out of the air. Yes, it does get tiring but the sludge at the bottom of the bucket shows that it works. I always use respirator.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#12 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,991 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 25 February 2014 - 03:01 PM

I used to have adult students that would leave rough edges at time that I had not caught. I would have them sand using the downdraft tables in the studio with masks. Those tables came in handy in so many ways, but in the beginning I thought the money could have been better spent elsewhere.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#13 flowerdry

flowerdry

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 76 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 25 February 2014 - 06:38 PM

If you like a really smooth surface, check out a technique called burnishing.  It's a lot of work, but the surface of the finished piece feels like silk.


Doris Hackworth

"Promoting the joy of handmade pottery"


#14 minaa

minaa

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 01 March 2014 - 10:59 AM

Thanks for all the insight, everyone! It's helped me out a lot. :)



#15 Mart

Mart

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 282 posts

Posted 02 March 2014 - 06:29 AM

use water and wet sandpaper... dust problem solved.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users