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Source For Kiln Info / Manuals ?

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Anyone familiar with J.W. Good kilns and/or know where I might be able to find a manual for one ?

 

I was just given a J.W. Good - model 18R, with a model LT-4 Kiln Sitter.  The person I got it from never used it, and knows nothing about it.

 

If there's no manuals available - how about a formula for estimating firing temp based on wattage ?

 

I can't find any markings that indicate max firing temp - only the electrical ratings that state it is 1700 watts at 240v.  This seems like a pretty low wattage for a kiln - considering my electric hair dryer is 1500 watts.

 

I guess I could get an assortment of cones and do an empty test fire - but don't want to damage anything by putting too high a cone on the sitter.

 

 

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Marcia -

 

The only kilns I've seen listed with similar wattage are small, cube-shaped, 110v kilns, around 1 cubic ft or less. 

 

My newly aquired kiln is 8-sides, approx 16"w x 27"h inside - about 3.3 cu ft.  Comparably sized kilns from manufactures I've found on the web are in the 6k-8k watt range. 

 

At this point, based on the wattage label, I'm pretty certain that this is a low-firing kiln - I just don't know how low.  I think I know where I can borrow a pyrometer, and I know I can buy cones to test with.  I was just hoping to find some info first, so I can at-least narrow the range of test cones needed.  

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Update...  I contacted a local kiln technician (builder/servicer), and he said the 7amp label I saw is most likely only for the removable top section. 

 

On closer look, and comparing to a few pic's I found on the web, I can see where there was another plate/label near the bottom of the control box on the main section...  It now appears that my kiln is probably in the 6k watt (25amps) range.

 

The tech also told me that JW Good is out of buisness.   Would still like to get a manual, if anyone has one they'd be willing to scan.. but it looks like the only way I'm going to know for sure what it can do, is to test it with some cones and/or pyrometer.

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this might be of help

 

http://www.potters.org/subject85947.htm

 

Thanks for the link. The description given in the original post certainly seems to confirm what was suggested by the the technician at VulcanKilns.com regarding the label applying to just the upper ring.

 

Unfortunately that post is quite old, and Sugarcreek Industries is also, apparently, out of business.  The website link is dead (brings up a 'place-holder' page) - and the 800 number is answered with 'Congratulations - just for calling, you win a Caribbean cruise....'

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Anyone familiar with J.W. Good kilns and/or know where I might be able to find a manual for one ?

 

I was just given a J.W. Good - model 18R, with a model LT-4 Kiln Sitter.  The person I got it from never used it, and knows nothing about it.

 

If there's no manuals available - how about a formula for estimating firing temp based on wattage ?

 

I can't find any markings that indicate max firing temp - only the electrical ratings that state it is 1700 watts at 240v.  This seems like a pretty low wattage for a kiln - considering my electric hair dryer is 1500 watts.

 

I guess I could get an assortment of cones and do an empty test fire - but don't want to damage anything by putting too high a cone on the sitter.

 

Would you be able to post some photos of the kiln and the sitter? Does it have two sections or three? 1700 is probably the wattage for each section. (Wattage / voltage = amps, by the way; make sure your wiring is up to snuff.)

 

Don't forget to check if it's a 3-phase or single-phase kiln; it should say 1P or 3P on that metal plate.

 

Also, if I'm not mistaken, you can't make your kiln fire hotter than what it's made to do. If you set all of your dials (I'm assuming it's a manual kiln, since it's older) to high with a cone pack ranging from 5-10 (you can try 11 or 12, but only if you are super worried about knowing whether it goes over 10; small kiln like that, not likely), put a cone 10 bar or junior cone in the sitter, set the timer for 8-10 hours, and then (after proper cooling time) check it and see what your highest falling cone is.

 

I think LT-4 is an Orton product and you can still get replacement parts from Skutt (who purchased Orton when they went under).

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Nancy-

 

The controls are split into 3 sections, although the kiln itself is physically two sections - a two-ring base about 18" high with a removable 9" high ring on top.  (The label that says 1700w is on the top ring.)  

 

It's single-phase, & has a 30-amp 'dryer cord', with the ground connected to the control-box.  (Another reason I was confused by the 7amp label.)  I've done a lot of electrical work over the years, and will definitely be sure wire/breaker/outlet are 'up-to-snuff' before I plug it in.  I will probably use wire rated for 40amps, with 30amp breaker just to be extra safe.

 

As mentioned in my last update, am now almost certain the 1700watts/7amps label is for the upper ring only.  Below are pic's of the kiln, with close-ups of the label and sitter.  I was able to download a manual for an LT-3 sitter from VulcanKilns.com - and it is close enough to the LT-4 to cover what I need to know for the sitter.

 

I would still like to find instructions for the rest of the controls - and recommended firing schedules (what settings to use for what cone-temp & how long at each setting.)

 

post-19205-0-62981200-1394389455_thumb.jpg  post-19205-0-26753900-1394389457_thumb.jpg  post-19205-0-36469500-1394389458_thumb.jpg

 

PS - The wooden platform you see in the pic is just a temporary home to make it easy to move around in my garage until I build a metal stand ...  I have no intention of plugging it in until it's on a suitably heat-tolerant base. :)

post-19205-0-62981200-1394389455_thumb.jpg

post-19205-0-26753900-1394389457_thumb.jpg

post-19205-0-36469500-1394389458_thumb.jpg

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