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Firing A "large" Slab


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#21 Babs

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:49 PM

Good luck Benzine!

Oh for a front loader...You've probably just hooked another clay worker with that student :)



#22 Benzine

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:58 PM

There are a lot of times, where a front loader would be handy. It doesn't help, that I have to step on the corner of the kiln stand to load things in the kiln, and I'm average height. I don't think I'd have space for a comparable size front loader, in the space of the current kiln, even if cost wasn't an issue.

The student really does like art, though I don't know if they will go into the field. Who knows though?
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#23 Pres

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:09 PM

One of the reasons I got rid of the hinge and just lift on the lid. On some loads I would take off the 3rd section to load the bottom two, then add the 3rd to load that area. Some days I would add the 4th section then add the lid. Worked easier than straining all of the time to load carefully. Problem was always getting that lid on the 4th section hmmmmmmpf! :wacko:


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#24 Benzine

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:39 PM

That's a good solution Pres, though with my class kiln, it would be difficult with the digital controller mounted on the outside.
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#25 Pres

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 01:57 PM

Yeah the size of them makes it so that they bridge two sections. If I ever upgrade to a digital controller with this kiln, or a new one, I will have mine mounted on the wall.


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#26 Benzine

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:40 PM

Yeah Pres, I double checked the kiln again today, the controller does indeed attach on two sections. So no unstacking/ stacking of the layers around large wares.

The slab fired today, and had cooled to around eight hundred, by the time I was leaving. So naturally I had to quickly peek.

The slab made it through the firing intact!
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#27 Pres

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 08:02 PM

Job well done!


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#28 Benzine

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 08:47 PM

Job well done!


I'd like to thank the Academy....

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?
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#29 bciskepottery

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 09:42 PM

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?


Your platter will expand and shrink in second firing, too. Recommend keep the coils/slats.

#30 Benzine

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 09:50 PM

Seriously though, thank you all, for the suggestions. I'll post some photos after the second firing....I shouldn't need the coils for that right?

Your platter will expand and shrink in second firing, too. Recommend keep the coils/slats.

I wondered about that. Would some one inch shelf posts, laid on their side work OK as well? It will be less of a hassle to use those, than to keep all the coils we used, for the first firing.
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#31 bciskepottery

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 06:16 AM

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.

#32 Benzine

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:00 AM

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.


Ah yes, I didn't think about that. I'll just use the coils again then, and give them to the student after the second firing, as a souvenir.....No student ever wants the "Souvenirs" I offer them; the exposed ends of their 35mm film, dried acrylic peeled off the palettes, etc......
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#33 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:26 AM

Use the coils again. It will help even the temperature around the piece.
Marcia

#34 Babs

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 05:24 PM

 

I'd stick with the coils, they've already been bisqued and will expand/shrink at the same rate as the slab in the second firing. Your posts will neither expand nor shrink.


Ah yes, I didn't think about that. I'll just use the coils again then, and give them to the student after the second firing, as a souvenir.....No student ever wants the "Souvenirs" I offer them; the exposed ends of their 35mm film, dried acrylic peeled off the palettes, etc......

 

Such a giver!

Could suggest he paints them, totem sticks...



#35 Benzine

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 10:21 AM

Alright, the relief was stained, and fired the second time, on the coils. I turned out well, but as you can see from the photo, a small stress crack appeared. I was able to unload it, with no issues. I looked on the back, and it appears the crack originates from, one of the areas, the student hollowed out. It was a corner area, so that sharp point probably had a lot of stress, during the firing.

I have no idea, how weak the crack is, but I definitely want to reinforce it. I was thinking of some Gorilla glue on the back side, to hold, and maybe some epoxy on the crack on the front, with some paint to hide disguise the crack.

Any suggestions?

Attached Files


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#36 Pres

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:03 AM

Looks like it could be a cooling dunt, don't know.  My best thought is to fill areas of crack in the back with epoxy putty working it in with old credit card. Front could probably be matched up with acrylic and a lot of work.


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#37 bciskepottery

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 12:21 PM

Mounting the slab on a round piece of plywood on the back would give it stability and allow for wall hanging. The plywood backing could be a bit bigger and painted to serve as a border, or just match the size of the slab.

You and your student did a terrific job. His art work is wonderful; the firing job well done.

#38 Pres

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 01:20 PM

Great thought, Bruce, on the plywood backing, could even be a frame edge, also easier to hang.


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#39 Babs

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 05:17 PM

Great effort Benzine, whew, what a relief!

Like th idea of backing and hanging.

Best with the repair job.

Babs



#40 clay lover

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 05:33 PM

What a great project.  Your student should be very happy with this, and proud.






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