Jump to content


Photo

Searching For Discontinued Glaze - Help? Also Lead Questions

glaze lead discontinued jungle gems mayco

  • Please log in to reply
30 replies to this topic

#21 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,025 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:19 AM

IF using for food bacteria can flourish in the cracks of the glaze. Also interesting if you put beetroot in the dish!

 

If that were a really major issue........ millions of Japanese and Koreans would be ill or dying every day from it.

 

It CAN happen,........ but how often does it happen?  This is not as big an issue as many make it out to be.

 

I'm working on a study to address this question. 

 

best,

 

...................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#22 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 519 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:29 AM

I sell my crazed pots to these new companies that grow 'friendly bacteria' for your belly.  ;)



#23 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,727 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 22 February 2014 - 11:53 AM

IF using for food bacteria can flourish in the cracks of the glaze. Also interesting if you put beetroot in the dish!

 
If that were a really major issue........ millions of Japanese and Koreans would be ill or dying every day from it.
 
It CAN happen,........ but how often does it happen?  This is not as big an issue as many make it out to be.
 
I'm working on a study to address this question. 
 
best,
 
...................john

Isn't the bigger issue on low fire ware, where the bacteria and mold get through the crazed glaze, and into the porous clay body?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#24 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,805 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:24 PM

Isn't the bigger issue on low fire ware, where the bacteria and mold get through the crazed glaze, and into the porous clay body?

 

Restaurants aren't allowed to use non-vitrified ware for this reason. All dishes and utensils used for cooking and serving must be non-porous. No earthenware, no wooden bowls or spoons, no wood cutting boards or counter tops. Of course, their definition of vitrified is pretty vague- they don't give a specific absorption rate.

 

However, people have been cooking with and eating off of crazed glazes and earthenware pots for centuries, and as far as we know people weren't dying from it in any great numbers, or at all. Could be that all those stomach aches come from it, though.

 

Personally, I have seen black gunk growing underneath a crazed earthenware glaze. Pretty nasty. I swore from that moment I would never use earthenware for functional pots.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#25 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,121 posts

Posted 22 February 2014 - 06:19 PM

 

IF using for food bacteria can flourish in the cracks of the glaze. Also interesting if you put beetroot in the dish!

 

If that were a really major issue........ millions of Japanese and Koreans would be ill or dying every day from it.

 

It CAN happen,........ but how often does it happen?  This is not as big an issue as many make it out to be.

 

I'm working on a study to address this question. 

 

best,

 

...................john

 

No big issue John, just a comment.

I don't use antibacterial spray in my kitchen either

:) Living on a rural property I'd hate to see what I have inadvertently ingested over my time here!

Local doc said my kids were healthy because of what they had ingested in the way of bacteria. Seemed immune to many gastros hitting the school population.

My favourite mug wouldn't pass the no craze test. :o



#26 Up in Smoke Pottery

Up in Smoke Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 89 posts
  • LocationSioux Falls, SD

Posted 24 February 2014 - 12:01 AM

Ashleigh, a source for more of the discontinued Jungle Jems is Dakota Potters Supply,  The often have several of the discontinued lines due having to order so much at a time for distributorship.  I cannot say if they have that particular one or not, but calling them may be worth a shot.  I know I have had fun playing with lots of old discontined products they have stashed away.

 

www.dakotapotters.com

 

Best of luck,

 

Chad


Chad

Up in Smoke Pottery

upinsmokepottery.com

 

 


#27 ashleigh_arts

ashleigh_arts

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationArkansas

Posted 24 February 2014 - 09:36 AM

Ashleigh, a source for more of the discontinued Jungle Jems is Dakota Potters Supply,  The often have several of the discontinued lines due having to order so much at a time for distributorship.  I cannot say if they have that particular one or not, but calling them may be worth a shot.  I know I have had fun playing with lots of old discontined products they have stashed away.

 

www.dakotapotters.com

 

Best of luck,

 

Chad

 

Thank you very much! I will call when they open! :)



#28 Biglou13

Biglou13

    Advanced beginner pottery, Advanced in other art

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,039 posts
  • LocationNorth Florida

Posted 25 February 2014 - 04:35 PM

There is a difference between food safe and sanitary safe.

I'm a fan of glazes that often craze.

the clay underneath is vitrified in the pieces that I make.

The question is can crazed wares be made food safe with proper sanitary procedure, or convenient sanitary procedure in home and or commercial kitchen.
I can't tell you how many times I've been to restaurants and silver/table ware isin't physically clean. While it may have been through sanitizing solution, any physical residue is a fail.
Don't even get me started on cleanliness of glasses in hotel rooms.
A 180 F rinse cycle is acceptable or dilute bleach rinse are acceptable. Both of which I'd take over other chemical solutions.
If you really want to test for crazing write on a light colored piece with a sharpie, pause then wipe away surface before it dries.

I'm looking forward to seeing the results of your study John.

Ps. I drink from crazed pieces daily.
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#29 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 3,025 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 25 February 2014 - 04:55 PM

There is a difference between food safe and sanitary safe.

I'm a fan of glazes that often craze.

the clay underneath is vitrified in the pieces that I make.

The question is can crazed wares be made food safe with proper sanitary procedure, or convenient sanitary procedure in home and or commercial kitchen.
I can't tell you how many times I've been to restaurants and silver/table ware isin't physically clean. While it may have been through sanitizing solution, any physical residue is a fail.
Don't even get me started on cleanliness of glasses in hotel rooms.
A 180 F rinse cycle is acceptable or dilute bleach rinse are acceptable. Both of which I'd take over other chemical solutions.
If you really want to test for crazing write on a light colored piece with a sharpie, pause then wipe away surface before it dries.

I'm looking forward to seeing the results of your study John.

Ps. I drink from crazed pieces daily.

 

I'm personally looking forward to having some hard data on this question.  But of course it won't apply to EVERY potential situiation of the useage of crazed pots.  But it will be a start.   It has taken a lot of work so far to get this study figured out to have some solid science behind it (luckily I'm a geek-ey kinda' guy B) ).

 

I (and my family) use crazed pots of all types daily, plates, bowls, cups, teapots, etc....and our family has for as long as I can remember.  Kids grew up with them.

 

Commercial food service use is one thing, home use is another.  Different beasts.

 

We'll see what the story is...............................................................

 

best,

 

............................john


John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#30 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,121 posts

Posted 25 February 2014 - 05:34 PM

 

There is a difference between food safe and sanitary safe.

I'm a fan of glazes that often craze.

the clay underneath is vitrified in the pieces that I make.

The question is can crazed wares be made food safe with proper sanitary procedure, or convenient sanitary procedure in home and or commercial kitchen.
I can't tell you how many times I've been to restaurants and silver/table ware isin't physically clean. While it may have been through sanitizing solution, any physical residue is a fail.
Don't even get me started on cleanliness of glasses in hotel rooms.
A 180 F rinse cycle is acceptable or dilute bleach rinse are acceptable. Both of which I'd take over other chemical solutions.
If you really want to test for crazing write on a light colored piece with a sharpie, pause then wipe away surface before it dries.

I'm looking forward to seeing the results of your study John.

Ps. I drink from crazed pieces daily.

 

I'm personally looking forward to having some hard data on this question.  But of course it won't apply to EVERY potential situiation of the useage of crazed pots.  But it will be a start.   It has taken a lot of work so far to get this study figured out to have some solid science behind it (luckily I'm a geek-ey kinda' guy B) ).

 

I (and my family) use crazed pots of all types daily, plates, bowls, cups, teapots, etc....and our family has for as long as I can remember.  Kids grew up with them.

 

Commercial food service use is one thing, home use is another.  Different beasts.

 

We'll see what the story is...............................................................

 

best,

 

............................john

 

Who would have guessed???

WHIch way are you going with this study?

Types of foodstuffs placed in crazed ware, or comparison of crazed wares, washing procedures/

God how do you narrow the field?

As Big Lou says, the sanitization is an issue in crazed and non crazed ware. 

local bugs as to new to the person bugs also would play a part..

Love to read your results



#31 Chantay

Chantay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts
  • LocationVirginia, USA

Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:11 PM

I started out making/using earthenware.  One day one of my kids left a bowl in the bottom of the sink before we left town for two days.  Upon return the bottom of the pot had grown a nice culture of mold.  I have my earthen ware and still use it, I'm just very careful with it.  I now use/make stone ware.  I constantly am checking for vitrification. 

 

I REALLY like the work of Fongchoo.  I'm wondering if most of his tea pots are decorative vs functional.  Some of those spouts look pretty drippy.


- chantay





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: glaze, lead, discontinued, jungle gems, mayco

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users