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Making Your Own Glaze


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#41 oldlady

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 11:47 AM

one way to keep dust down is to work with a large scoop and a lid for the container you are putting the powdered glaze into.  put the scoop as far down in the bucket as possible and simply turn it over and remove quickly putting the lid on at once.  

 

doing all this outside with a fan running is better but we do not all have that luxury.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#42 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 06:58 PM

one way to keep dust down is to work with a large scoop and a lid for the container you are putting the powdered glaze into.  put the scoop as far down in the bucket as possible and simply turn it over and remove quickly putting the lid on at once.  
 
doing all this outside with a fan running is better but we do not all have that luxury.


You can also keep dust down by starting with some water in the glaze bucket with water and then adding the dry ingredients, then add the the rest of your water, mix, sieve, and glaze.

#43 Mark C.

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 07:24 PM

Always mix dry into water for dust control-you can fine tune later with more water.

Mark


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#44 Babs

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 08:27 PM

Only ingredient I mix dry  is, if the glaze calls for a small percetage of bentonite, I mix this dry with the first ingredient in the glaze, do the rest wet adding the Bentonite and other at end;  slake the glaze o'night before sieving.



#45 oldlady

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Posted 01 October 2014 - 11:40 PM

there is an advantage to mixing a base recipe dry and storing it dry.  once a bucketful is mixed, it lasts indefinitely.  when it is mixed with water, sometimes it is not used for some time and crusty stuff forms on the top or it dries out completely or gets so thick it has to be reconstituted anyway.  lots of labor or irritation.

 

the biggest advantage, to me anyway, is that if the base is available and if it was originally called "green", i am free to try the base with other colors at any time i want.  a ten gram (about a tablespoon dry) test of several mason stain colors lets me know which recipe is best for say turquoise or yellow without wasting lots of time or ingredients on something that won't work anyway.  and when i do want the green, i just put a couple thousand grams into the scale and add the proper amount of copper carb to get it.  that amount of glaze will get me through a lot of pots since i spray.

 

i guess this is what some of you get when you pay someone to mix dry ingredients and you add water when you get it in the mail.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#46 Harold Roberts

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:32 PM

To truly understand clay & glazes & their materials I would suggest reading, Out of the Earth Into the Fire by Mimi Obstler.






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