Jump to content


Photo

Making Your Own Glaze


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#21 Benzine

Benzine

    Socratic Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,638 posts
  • LocationThe Hawkeye State

Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:11 PM

Rebekah,

 

I get quite a bit of materials, from Continental Clay, in Minnesota.  That probably wouldn't be too far for you.


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#22 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 467 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 28 February 2014 - 11:32 AM

Buy a pallet, you will use it. Get in a nice clay supply with the glaze materials.



#23 Mark369

Mark369

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 67 posts
  • LocationLouisville,Ky & Indiana

Posted 06 March 2014 - 09:24 AM

This can be easy or as complicated as you want it to be. From adding colorants to a commercial clear glaze to analyzing the chemical formulas of each ingredient.

 Clay "fit" is how it reacts to your clay body so have you decided on a clay body?

What cone are you going to fire at and do you want to do a several cone fire range?

 

Check out the books, The Potter's Complete Book of Clay and Glazes by James Chappell

Clay and Glazes for the Potter by Daniel Rhodes

Find as much info as possible and experiment...record everything, happy accidents are the hardest to repeat.


Everything tastes better with cat hair in it !

 

Curiosity may have killed the cat, but it died knowing something! :wacko:


#24 Stephen

Stephen

    novice

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 06 March 2014 - 11:44 AM

You might think about a test kiln so you can run frequent test without feeling the 'need' to fill it up. The changing of firing schedules will yield a variety of results from the same clay. If you do get a test kiln try and match it to your large kiln with firing schedules that match so they have the same rate of rise and cooling. I got a rather small one (1cf) and kind of regret it. If I had gotten a  2-3 CF then we could run larger test. Dinner plates for instance will not fit and a tall vase would not either, but having a test kiln has worked well and it gets used a lot. 



#25 Rebekah Krieger

Rebekah Krieger

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 553 posts
  • LocationWisconsin

Posted 06 March 2014 - 01:17 PM

Thank you to everyone who has given me great advice.  I do have a small second kiln but it is not controlled so i would only be able to test glazes rather than firing schedules in it.  I am excited for the possible variety here.. I have SO many glaze recipes I want to try as well. <3  Now if only life would chill out a little bit so I can get to it already!!! 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#26 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 467 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:00 PM

I have a largish kiln and a small test kiln with completely different firing schedules and the glazes look basically the same. I would say the small test kilns glazes actually look better but I have no idea on its firing schedule. I just turn it on full power for 7 hours and it gets to cone 9/10. It is great for testing glazes in because of its quick turn around.

 

When mixing up glazes I find it is good to leave them for a day otherwise you end up with quite a bubbly test tile. 

( I never listen to my own advice and have a lot of bubbly test tiles  <_< )



#27 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,730 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:30 PM

I have a largish kiln and a small test kiln with completely different firing schedules and the glazes look basically the same. I would say the small test kilns glazes actually look better but I have no idea on its firing schedule. I just turn it on full power for 7 hours and it gets to cone 9/10. It is great for testing glazes in because of its quick turn around.

 

When mixing up glazes I find it is good to leave them for a day otherwise you end up with quite a bubbly test tile. 

( I never listen to my own advice and have a lot of bubbly test tiles  <_< )

 

Glazes in my three kilns can look radically different due to the cooling times. My baby kiln can be unloaded 5 hours after it reaches cone 6, the medium kiln in 15 hours, the big kiln takes 30 hours. A controlled cooling cycle is necessary for me to get the same results, which requires digital controllers. You can get an external digital controller, but it'll cost you $500 or more, so maybe not worth it unless you really want to do a lot of testing.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#28 Stephen

Stephen

    novice

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:41 AM

yeah both of ours have the same Bartlet controllers which I did intentionally so I could match them up for testing. Not sure I would want it any different since the test would not necessarily match results in the large kiln and for me the whole point is to get it down in the small kiln and then fire a large load based on those results. My test kiln is only 12"x9" (two sections with 2 shelves) and cost about $650ish. If I ever replace this one I will get something a little bigger so I can test a plate or charger in it.

 

I use it fairly often testing glazes and I can't imagine trying to test glaze samples in the larger kiln. The large one is not very big at 10cf but it seems like it is way too large to fire test tiles. I know it only cost a few bucks to fire it but there is also the wear and tear on it to just fire 10-12 test tiles or a cup or two with glaze combinations. I do it enough that I would even say it will eventually save me a set of elements in the large kiln and that would offset a big chunk of the cost of the test kiln.  



#29 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 467 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:18 PM

I have one digital controller for the big kiln but it just has ramp 1 where you put in temperature and time then ramp 2 where you just input top temperature and a hold function. Not very fancy but I don't think my glazes are that fancy  ^_^ I would like to experiment with cooldowns but that will have to wait till I get cash to spare.

 

Why cant you just add a few test tiles into your larger kiln when firing a load? I find they fit in well in those small spaces I can never get to disappear. Just got to time tests with a glaze firing.



#30 Stephen

Stephen

    novice

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 07 March 2014 - 06:26 PM

Hey High Bridge,

 

Certainly could save them and run in next glaze firing most of the time but that wouldn't work if trying firing schedules for particular glazes. Also my test are generally independent of larger loads and it is nice to just finish when I'm doing test by loading up the test tiles/pieces and run it.

 

...but of course your right you do not need a test kiln, just a nice luxury :-)   



#31 Aodenkou

Aodenkou

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • LocationIndiana

Posted 24 September 2014 - 10:00 PM

In the YouTube video the gentleman was dipping the mugs dry.  YEARS ago when I too my first ceramics class I was told to quickly dip my pot in water to get rid of the dust and to have the bisque ware damp so that it did not take up too much glaze.

 

I set up my studio about 8 years ago and have been dipping my bisque ware in water prior to glazing.  QUESTION: Is it better to dip or pour glaze over dry bisque than wetting it as I have described?

 

Thanks in advance for any advice!



#32 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,932 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 24 September 2014 - 11:21 PM

I only dip or pour over dry pots except for some imbosed square plates where I want less glaze (thin)-then I spray them down with water mister.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#33 oldlady

oldlady

    single firing an electric kiln to cone 6

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 996 posts
  • Locationharpers ferry west va and pinellas park fl

Posted 25 September 2014 - 09:01 AM

dampen the pots if you plan to dip.  whoever you were watching may have a reason for what he does.  why change what has worked for you for so long?


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#34 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,730 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 25 September 2014 - 09:02 AM

I find that if your pot is already wet, you have to have the glazes mixed pretty thick to get a decent layer applied. The problem is that really thick glazes don't go on as evenly. Also, if you make thin pots and they're already wet before you glaze them, they come out of the glaze totally saturated and take forever to dry. I glaze with my pots dry, and my glazes mixed to the consistency of thick creamy chocolate milk, and dip for a 6 count.

 

If the purpose of getting them wet before dipping is to make sure you don't get the glaze too thick, then just don't dip it as long and save yourself a step.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#35 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,506 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 25 September 2014 - 09:43 AM

Your bisque temperature is also key. The higher the bisque temperature, the less absorbent it will be when dipping in glaze. The lower the bisque temperature, it will be more absorbent. Many community studios bisque high, like cone 05/04 to reduce glaze overruns from less experienced potters (the three second dip rule). Also, depending on the porosity of your bisque, you may need to adjust the viscosity of your glazes (thicker, thinner). Dipping/spraying in water will make the bisque less porous.

#36 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,730 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:08 AM

Your bisque temperature is also key. The higher the bisque temperature, the less absorbent it will be when dipping in glaze. The lower the bisque temperature, it will be more absorbent.

 

Excellent point! I prefer my porcelain bisqued to 04, but like the stoneware at 06. I bisque everything to 04 to make things easier, and just dip the stoneware a little longer.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#37 Crusty

Crusty

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts
  • LocationLouisville,Ky in the Ohio river valley

Posted 30 September 2014 - 11:24 AM

some great info here, don't stop now... :D


I like to throw red clay, it balls nicely and hurts like hell when it hits you...


#38 Chantay

Chantay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 233 posts
  • LocationVirginia, USA

Posted 30 September 2014 - 02:54 PM

If Your just starting out with mixing your own glazes you need some items other than the raw materials.  A few of the items are:

sieves, large and test size

buckets with lids

mixer, I use a kitchen hand blender, you can use a drill (although I got plastic chunks in my glazes from the drill on the bottom of the bucket.)

brushes, spatulas, trays, etc..

fine particle mask

place to mix and to store materials

 

I'm sure there are more I can't think of at the moment.


- chantay

#39 tomhumf

tomhumf

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts

Posted 30 September 2014 - 04:43 PM

....a decent accurate scale to measure small quantities for tests


Check out my awesome pots :)

Woodseats Pottery - Mugs, Bowls etc.


#40 Stephen

Stephen

    novice

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 263 posts

Posted 01 October 2014 - 10:32 AM

I would also recommend exploring developing a good bases and then coloring them with oxides and stains. You will want both an opaque and transparent options. Use the recipe hunt for specialty glazes. I tried recipe after recipe and ended up when some very nice glazes. The problem was that the ones that made the cut as a group were all over the board and as a group kind of weird. Also you need to make a decision on how many glazes you are going to have and try to stay within this number by dropping and adding until you hit your regular lineup. It is very easy once you start trying this and that to end up with 25-30 glazes or more.

 

Also I have seen here and now adopted the advice of not dry mixing glaze materials. I found this to be problematic and always, no matter how hard I tried, ended up putting unwanted dust in the air by the time I finished mixing a half dozen batches. I now add to a bucket of water, about 75% of the water I want to end up with. We have recently started using a hydrometer to try and nail the right thickness of each glaze based on test firings. The thumb drip and '2% milk' consistency just was not cutting it.

 

Oh and I bought a really expensive digital gram scale from a pottery supply house that is great but I have found myself using a $20 target one as my go to and it seems to be just fine.

 

Good luck!  






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users