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Making Your Own Glaze


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#21 Benzine

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:11 PM

Rebekah,

 

I get quite a bit of materials, from Continental Clay, in Minnesota.  That probably wouldn't be too far for you.


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#22 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 11:32 AM

Buy a pallet, you will use it. Get in a nice clay supply with the glaze materials.


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#23 Mark369

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 09:24 AM

This can be easy or as complicated as you want it to be. From adding colorants to a commercial clear glaze to analyzing the chemical formulas of each ingredient.

 Clay "fit" is how it reacts to your clay body so have you decided on a clay body?

What cone are you going to fire at and do you want to do a several cone fire range?

 

Check out the books, The Potter's Complete Book of Clay and Glazes by James Chappell

Clay and Glazes for the Potter by Daniel Rhodes

Find as much info as possible and experiment...record everything, happy accidents are the hardest to repeat.


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#24 Stephen

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 11:44 AM

You might think about a test kiln so you can run frequent test without feeling the 'need' to fill it up. The changing of firing schedules will yield a variety of results from the same clay. If you do get a test kiln try and match it to your large kiln with firing schedules that match so they have the same rate of rise and cooling. I got a rather small one (1cf) and kind of regret it. If I had gotten a  2-3 CF then we could run larger test. Dinner plates for instance will not fit and a tall vase would not either, but having a test kiln has worked well and it gets used a lot. 



#25 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 01:17 PM

Thank you to everyone who has given me great advice.  I do have a small second kiln but it is not controlled so i would only be able to test glazes rather than firing schedules in it.  I am excited for the possible variety here.. I have SO many glaze recipes I want to try as well. <3  Now if only life would chill out a little bit so I can get to it already!!! 


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#26 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:00 PM

I have a largish kiln and a small test kiln with completely different firing schedules and the glazes look basically the same. I would say the small test kilns glazes actually look better but I have no idea on its firing schedule. I just turn it on full power for 7 hours and it gets to cone 9/10. It is great for testing glazes in because of its quick turn around.

 

When mixing up glazes I find it is good to leave them for a day otherwise you end up with quite a bubbly test tile. 

( I never listen to my own advice and have a lot of bubbly test tiles  <_< )


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#27 neilestrick

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:30 PM

I have a largish kiln and a small test kiln with completely different firing schedules and the glazes look basically the same. I would say the small test kilns glazes actually look better but I have no idea on its firing schedule. I just turn it on full power for 7 hours and it gets to cone 9/10. It is great for testing glazes in because of its quick turn around.

 

When mixing up glazes I find it is good to leave them for a day otherwise you end up with quite a bubbly test tile. 

( I never listen to my own advice and have a lot of bubbly test tiles  <_< )

 

Glazes in my three kilns can look radically different due to the cooling times. My baby kiln can be unloaded 5 hours after it reaches cone 6, the medium kiln in 15 hours, the big kiln takes 30 hours. A controlled cooling cycle is necessary for me to get the same results, which requires digital controllers. You can get an external digital controller, but it'll cost you $500 or more, so maybe not worth it unless you really want to do a lot of testing.


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#28 Stephen

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:41 AM

yeah both of ours have the same Bartlet controllers which I did intentionally so I could match them up for testing. Not sure I would want it any different since the test would not necessarily match results in the large kiln and for me the whole point is to get it down in the small kiln and then fire a large load based on those results. My test kiln is only 12"x9" (two sections with 2 shelves) and cost about $650ish. If I ever replace this one I will get something a little bigger so I can test a plate or charger in it.

 

I use it fairly often testing glazes and I can't imagine trying to test glaze samples in the larger kiln. The large one is not very big at 10cf but it seems like it is way too large to fire test tiles. I know it only cost a few bucks to fire it but there is also the wear and tear on it to just fire 10-12 test tiles or a cup or two with glaze combinations. I do it enough that I would even say it will eventually save me a set of elements in the large kiln and that would offset a big chunk of the cost of the test kiln.  



#29 High Bridge Pottery

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:18 PM

I have one digital controller for the big kiln but it just has ramp 1 where you put in temperature and time then ramp 2 where you just input top temperature and a hold function. Not very fancy but I don't think my glazes are that fancy  ^_^ I would like to experiment with cooldowns but that will have to wait till I get cash to spare.

 

Why cant you just add a few test tiles into your larger kiln when firing a load? I find they fit in well in those small spaces I can never get to disappear. Just got to time tests with a glaze firing.


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#30 Stephen

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Posted 07 March 2014 - 06:26 PM

Hey High Bridge,

 

Certainly could save them and run in next glaze firing most of the time but that wouldn't work if trying firing schedules for particular glazes. Also my test are generally independent of larger loads and it is nice to just finish when I'm doing test by loading up the test tiles/pieces and run it.

 

...but of course your right you do not need a test kiln, just a nice luxury :-)   






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