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#1 AWPottery

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 11:24 PM

I was looking at naked raku pots done by Kate and Will Jacobson and the beautiful colors and designs they had.  1) I was wondering what they did for colorants?  Is this underglaze painted over the terra sig? some type of paint?  2)  How did they carve through the clear glaze/slip layer of the pot to create the black designs without being able to see the colorant they put on beforehand?



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 February 2014 - 11:40 PM

I think it is an underglaze. If you go to their website they show you how the pieces are carved.
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#3 AWPottery

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 12:06 AM

Marcia... thank you, yes I did see that.  What I don't seem to get is how they know where to carve through the slip/glaze layer to create the black lines around the underglaze/colorant since it covered up by the slip/glaze layer you put on the pot.



#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:50 AM

Good point. I'll go back and look again. They have been doing naked Raku for decades. I always loved their work.
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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:54 AM

Here is another link to the workshop at NCECA in 2012.
http://flyeschool.co...erghs-sue-morse

I don't know how they are coloring. Really nice work.Maybe you should find them and take a workshop. They are real masters at Naked Raku.
There was an article in 2011 PMI and the colors are definitely under the Naku clay slip in the process.

http://ceramicartsda...eroctober-2011/

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#6 AWPottery

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 08:06 AM

Thanks Marcia... you're always very helpful :) 



#7 Mug

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 08:41 AM

I would wager they used china paints and fired the piece more than once...from what i understand it's not easy to get it to look that good.



#8 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 08:53 AM

The color is under the the slip being chiseled off after the firing. Firing again afterwards would burn off all the black carbon in the lines and crackles.

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#9 Mug

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 09:01 AM

I could be wrong,but From what I understand you would need fire at lower temperatures than the first to set the china paint and keep the reduction.



#10 ayjay

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 11:34 AM

There's definitely some colour under the removable layer, and then a process called "colour saturation".

 

I've no idea how the colour thing works, but it's too good to be a happy accident.

 

http://www.jacobsona...m/#!__workshops



#11 neilestrick

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 06:11 PM

Mug- yes, china paints are fired at a lower temperature, but still hot enough that the carbon would burn out.

 

It looks to me like some colored slips are applied before the firing in a somewhat random manner to give a base layer of color, but then color is added afterwards to define objects in the design. If you look at the photos she's got a palette of paints next to the pot, probably acrylics. I think 'Color Saturation' is just a fancy way of saying 'painting'.

 

Nice stuff.


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#12 Mug

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 07:05 PM

I read about the technique some where...It could be a poor recollection. The only thing I could find today was an article from the Big ceramics store  http://www.bigcerami...le_firings.html

Kate and Will have had some work shops it would be worth seeing what secrets they hold. I see they found the technique by accident.

That's some accident



#13 AWPottery

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 10:51 PM

Do you guys think I could paint underglazes on top of the terra sig and that would work for different colorings?  Or would there be no more sheen where I put the underglazes since I am painting over part of the pot I just burnished?



#14 neilestrick

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 10:57 PM

Correct, the underglazes won't have the sheen. But that could be nice.
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#15 Babs

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 01:15 AM

I thought there were some colloidal slips  from light coloured clays to which potters added colour, could this be relevant? 

Sgraffitto the lines then place resist in the lines, glaze,  fire,then remove glaze after reduction?



#16 AWPottery

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 08:15 AM

Babs- what are colloidal slips?  I've never heard of that term before.

 

Another thought I just had.... what if I used colored terra sigs and randomly placed different parts/bands across the same pot.... I would still get a sheen with this unlike the underglazes put with the underglazes I guess would be more precise in actually painting some type of design.  Or is there something I could put over the pot after it was "naked rakued" to give it a sheen where I had used underglazes?

 

Or what about using watercolors after you have naked rakued the piece?

 

Hahah.... some many thoughts.



#17 Mug

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 09:50 AM

I found this link http://www.english.i...pes_of_raku.htm at the bottom of the page they make reference to multiple firings. Looking at their Wayfinding pot it looks layered. Would it be possible to paint the slip/ glaze over specific colored areas, that part being protected with the slip/ glaze combo, and not burn out the first layer of carbon....I was thinking for some reason the final temp was as low as 800 degrees F. All and all I would think acrylic and water colors would be blasphemy to these die hard Naked Raku guru's .



#18 Babs

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 06:53 PM

Babs- what are colloidal slips?  I've never heard of that term before.

 

Another thought I just had.... what if I used colored terra sigs and randomly placed different parts/bands across the same pot.... I would still get a sheen with this unlike the underglazes put with the underglazes I guess would be more precise in actually painting some type of design.  Or is there something I could put over the pot after it was "naked rakued" to give it a sheen where I had used underglazes?

 

Or what about using watercolors after you have naked rakued the piece?

 

Hahah.... some many thoughts.

Colloidal slips are made from clay with very fine particles may be synomonous with terra sig. don't know. The c. slips stay in suspension, but you can colour them before you settle out the slip layer. Don't know if you can use stains or just carbonates, one of the gurus will be able to add to that.

Can polish your pot up with beeswax and sheepskin after they are finished to enhance the sheen.



#19 Dick White

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 02:23 PM

Kate and Will Jacobson have a chapter in Eduardo Lazo's book, "Naked Raku and Related Bare Clay Techniques" in which they describe their technique. Briefly, some of the underlying colors are thin layers of colored clays (usually porcelain) brushed on the leatherhard piece, and then burnished several times while drying. After the piece is bisqued, they follow their usual naked raku process (they use a 2-step process of a thin coating of resist slip with an outer layer of glaze with sgraffito drawn through the glaze). Finally, they paint the finished piece with thin washes of acrylic to enhance the design.

 

Regarding the colloidal slips, yes, terra sig is another name. In my experience trying to color terra sig, I have found that the particle size of stain is larger than the terra sig clay particles, so the burnishing process will not result in as bright a shining surface. Copper/cobalt carbonates are smaller particles and thus burnish better, but still not as smooth as plain terra sig. I have also fiddled with using washes of thinned-down commercial underglazes on the terra sig and then burnishing a final time.

 

dw






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