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Elmers Glue For A Resist?


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#1 David F.

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:12 PM

It seems like I recall someone using elmer's glue for a resist that is easily applied using slip trailing techniques. I use paraffin for bottoms and lids bit it is dificult to control. I'd like to use a resist on top on a glaze and then apply another glaze. 

Any idea how it would burn out at cone 6 oxidation?



#2 Matt Oz

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 12:51 PM

Check out this article from ceramic arts daily

Beyond Wax Resist



#3 David F.

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 01:05 PM

thanks ... now I remember that article.



#4 Pres

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 02:57 PM

I have also used rubber cement as a resist for slip trailing techniques. It reacts a little differently, but when you have applied it to an area with a trailing bottle and let it dry the glaze over top works much the same as any other material. The interesting thing about it is the you can lift the rubber cement carefully pulling the whole resist area off of the pot.


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#5 Diane Puckett

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 07:44 PM

Pres, now I am wondering if rubber cement is easier to use than liquid latex. Or if they are basically the same thing.
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#6 Benzine

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 09:07 PM

Pres, now I am wondering if rubber cement is easier to use than liquid latex. Or if they are basically the same thing.

I wondered that as well.  I will say that I've used rubber cement in place of water color maskoid.  It works fairly well, but is so thin, that it can be difficult to control.


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#7 ayjay

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:41 AM

For a removable mask I use a product called Copydex, it's a rubbery glue mainly intended for sticking paper or cloth, (it's great for putting patches on the knees of my work trousers and will survive several washing machine cycles).

 

It's quite thick, and as with wax, brushes need washing off straight after use, it can be peeled off of bisque ware fairly easily, not sure if it would peel off glaze without also removing the glaze, also I've never left it on a piece and allowed it to burn off in the kiln, I'm sure it would but I don't know about the fumes or smell.

 

I've never attempted any fine work with it, but  a 6mm wide line should be do-able with a small brush, quite possibly smaller with a slip trailer.

 

Checking on Wiki, Copydex is latex dissolved in water and as such is relatively non-toxic and often used in primary schools.



#8 Pres

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 03:20 PM

I haven't tried this of late(rubber cement), but back in the day the rubber cement would go on pretty stringy if dripped or run through a squeegee bottle. I did not use tjanting tools as they would gum up. I used a bottle, or sometimes just dripped on with a brush held over the line.


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#9 Benzine

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 04:38 PM

Rubber cement is great for random flowing "squiggle" lines, for nearly any type of resist. It makes some very interesting areas in watercolor. I'll have to try it again, with glaze.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#10 Chantay

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 08:25 PM

The above mentioned article stated that white glue should be removed before firing. Does anyone know why this is so?


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#11 bciskepottery

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 09:32 PM

The above mentioned article stated that white glue should be removed before firing. Does anyone know why this is so?


My guess is that removing the white glue trailing, he allows the clay to get the effects of smoke-firing. He seems to smoke fire at a low temperature, maybe low enough that all of the white glue does not burn off before the paper/combustible ignites and smokes the surface.

I've used white glue to attach cookies to the bottoms of pillow vases and fired them to cone 6 with no problems. Gluing the cookie to the bottom makes it easier to put in the kiln.

#12 Babs

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 11:04 PM

WOuldn't removing the glue from glazed ware rip the glaze off also or is that what is being pursued?



#13 Benzine

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 08:01 AM

That was kind of my thought Babs. Latex resist is made to leave the bottom layer undisturbed, but I would think peeling off a white glue, would create issues upon removal,
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#14 bciskepottery

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 10:54 PM

I think we have two different uses of white glue as a resist here. One is using it over glaze to allow another glaze to be poured on top. I don't think anyone would suggest removing (or trying to remove) the white glue when used on top of glaze as a resist. The other use is as a resist on clay; in the case of Russell Fouts, he uses it to make a glaze pattern, then removes it to expose the clay body to the smoking technique.

#15 Benzine

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 11:23 PM

That makes sense.
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#16 ashleigh_arts

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 10:45 AM

I'm gonna try it. What's the worse that could happen?? :rolleyes:



#17 ashleigh_arts

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 10:45 AM

*worst

 

Oops.






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