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Inside Or Outside, But Never Both?


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#1 maya

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:33 PM

I always tell my fourth graders there's no such thing as a silly question, but this probably qualifies:

 

I handbuild exclusively and now that retirement is just around the corner, am spending more and more time on my clay.  But I always seem to have a conundrum:  either I slump into a mold and am able to carve and decorate the interior of the piece, or hump onto a mold and can carve and put feet, etc on the exterior.

 

Dilemma?  I can't figure out how to do both.  How do you decorate the interior AND also put feet, etc on the exterior?

 

Thoughts? Advice?



#2 neilestrick

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 01:45 PM

Decorate the interior first. Once it's firm in enough that the decoration won't get smushed, switch it to the outside of a form and put on the feet. Probably need a slightly smaller form for step 2.


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#3 Diane Puckett

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 03:34 PM

I was thinking I would use a hump mold, put the feet on, let sit to leatherhard, and then carve the inside. Don't know that it matters except that Neil's method would keep it stable while you worked on the inside.
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#4 Pres

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Posted 15 February 2014 - 04:15 PM

Depending on the form, you could decorate one side, lay the slab into the form with the decorated side down, then decorate the inside. A lot of the time if your form is too extreme this does not work because of cutting and rearranging. However, if the form is simple it should be a good way especially with impressed or slipped decoration. I have even rolled a slab over a textured slab, then textured the top of the slab, and then placed over a slump mold.


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#5 clay lover

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:23 AM

I have tried it both ways.  I do better with a hump form and putting feet on while it is still soft, otherwise I tend to have cracking problems with the attachments.   When I turn it out, I support the edges with one hand and carve with the other, or use foam strips for support, depending on the size.

 

Just this week, I have been struggling with small slipped and carved bowls, since the slip demands that the bowls be slumped and has to get past sticky to carve, so they are sort of too dry to put feet on later. GRRR    Any better ideas?.



#6 neilestrick

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:27 AM

If your attachments/feet are leather hard or the same hardness as the pot, that should reduce cracking problems.
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#7 clay lover

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 08:30 AM

Sounds like I might otta make my feet earlier and let them firm up some while I'm carving the slip!



#8 maya

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 09:37 AM

Clay lover, I know exactly what you mean.  When I first cut out my shape, I set aside the scraps and then form the feet from them.  I slump the form and work on it, while letting the feet "age" along with the piece.

 

The problem I encountered was that they never seemed to attach as well once they were leather hard.  I used the slip and score method, but they never attached as well as when the clay is first malleable and soft.  I've even had the feet fall off..........oy vey.

 

Hence my question about how to work the inside AND the outside.



#9 neilestrick

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 10:26 AM

Make sure you score deep. As deep as you can without causing problems. Score in one direction, then put some water or slip on it (I just use water) and score in the other direction. Make a real mess of it. The more sludge and the deeper the cuts the better. Do this to both pieces then wiggle them together.


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#10 clay lover

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 03:44 PM

How dry do you think this method works, Neil?



#11 Diane Puckett

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 07:53 PM

Consider paper clay slip. Sticks extremely well, sometimes too well. I have even see it used to repair bisque ware.
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#12 clay lover

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 11:12 PM

doesn't PC stink when it's kept around very long?



#13 neilestrick

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 09:10 AM

How dry do you think this method works, Neil?

 

You can join like this on the dry side of leather hard as long as both pieces are the same moisture level. The wetter the better, though.


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#14 PeterH

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Posted 18 February 2014 - 09:25 AM

doesn't PC stink when it's kept around very long?

 

If you keep it wet, but as it rehydrates overnight it's best to keep your PC stores in dry usable "bricks".

 

... advice originally from somebody who got "farmer's lung" from the mould in over-ripe PC.

 

Regards, Peter






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