Jump to content


Photo

What Sort Of Stirrer Do You Use.


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 890 posts

Posted 09 February 2014 - 07:38 PM

Having just watched John Britt videos, I am envious of his stick blender and the head on it.. At the mo. I use my partner's drill with a paint stirring bit. The bit shank is long and the stirring face small in diameter. and I have to Scrupulously clean every bit of glay/glaze from every part.

I was considering releasing my stick blender from domestic duties but fear for its life line.

What do you guys use?



#2 mregecko

mregecko

    Potteries

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 153 posts
  • LocationBay Area, CA

Posted 09 February 2014 - 08:04 PM

I've tried a bunch of things. Plungers, mixing bits in drills, toilet scrubbers.

I still prefer using a large whisk. I've seen them at a lot of pottery stores, but they're basically just big baker's whisks.

#3 Bill T.

Bill T.

    member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 73 posts
  • LocationGilmer, Texas

Posted 09 February 2014 - 08:36 PM

I picked up a stick blender at a garage sale cheap.  It works great.  I like it because it will get to the bottom of my containers to stir that up.  I don't mix buckets of glaze just about a gallon size container. 



#4 Norm Stuart

Norm Stuart

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 639 posts

Posted 09 February 2014 - 09:20 PM

When you're using buckets, regardless of what type of stirrer you use, there is no substitute for using your hand to check the bottom of the bucket after stirring to be certain that part of the glaze has not hard-panned there.

 

Putting on only some of the glaze ingredients is not the same as putting on all of the glaze ingredients.  Over time we occasionally find a glaze that need more Calcium Chloride to reflocculate.



#5 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 1,975 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:13 PM

I have a paint mixer, plastic head/metal shaft, that I use on a drill. I used to use a metal headed mixer, but that had a tendency to eat the bottom of the bucket a bit requiring an extra strain. i also use a stick blender for slips and engobes, and for a glaze recently drill mixed I use the good old toilet brush-a trick I learned here.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#6 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,807 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:20 PM

I got a heavy stirrer from the Bray store that doesn't chew up plastic buckets. I also have some jiffy mixers is three various sizes. Then, as Norm says check with your hands to make sure everything is mixed.
Marcia

I always sieve the first time before using and if it has been a while since using.

#7 Tyler Miller

Tyler Miller

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • LocationOntario, Canada

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:31 PM

I just use a basswood spatula and pour through a coarse mesh sieve between two buckets.



#8 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 658 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 09 February 2014 - 11:42 PM

I have several different sizes of paint stirrer that you use with a drill, tried a plunger didn't like using it.  If I'm mixing a new batch I pour it through a coarse mesh first then a fine mesh bucket to bucket.  If  I am mixing and old glaze, I'll use a paint stirrer and then check the bottom with my hand, if I am still unhappy with the consistency I run it through the mesh again.  Denice



#9 Mudslinger Ceramics

Mudslinger Ceramics

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 93 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 10 February 2014 - 02:41 AM

Use an ex-food stick mixer for amounts up to 2L, more than that and they burn out!   Use a drill with paint mixer blades (have 3 sizes) for bigger buckets up to 20L.

 

Do check the bottom to make sure all ingredients have mixed, then sieve through 80 mesh screen.

 

Do fair amount of slipcasting so use a 1500watt drill with large steel paint mixer for 20L buckets of clay slip.

 

Irene


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri


#10 High Bridge Pottery

High Bridge Pottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 370 posts
  • LocationNewcastle Upon Tyne. England

Posted 10 February 2014 - 08:03 AM

I bought a cheap soup blender for £7


                                                                                                                 1384226_215924051918490_1181728069_n.jpg


#11 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,494 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 10 February 2014 - 10:13 AM

For mixing small batches, nothing beats a stick blender. No screening necessary. Mine seem to last about a year if I'm using them a lot. The abrasiveness of the glaze materials eats up the bearings. I just buy the cheapest ones I can find, usually around $15. Some even come with a mixing cup that is quite handy to have around the studio. I got a really nice stainless cup with one of my mixers. For big buckets, any type of paint mixer on a drill will work. Metal versions can chew up buckets, so watch out there.


Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#12 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 890 posts

Posted 10 February 2014 - 05:57 PM

Thanks everyone, I wil free my stick blender to my p. shed and convince my partner to invest in a plastic headed paint stirrer!



#13 timbo_heff

timbo_heff

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 169 posts
  • LocationMA / NY

Posted 11 February 2014 - 12:32 PM

Dollar store toilet brushes are great for glaze !



#14 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,709 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 12 February 2014 - 09:40 PM

I finally returned back to clay work this week after moping/cleaning the studio a bit. I have taken  6 week break from clay work after x-mass. Taxes are ready  now for accountant and I was able to take a photo of what mixers I use almost every week.

I have them for any size bucket or condition of glaze -Hard settled or mixes easy-Huge bucket or tiny test batch -the red one was just given to me to try and I will next week-the metal ones I have used for years and wear them out and then replace them-I always have a few new ones in boxes ready to go

I use the largest ones every week as well as the smallest-I keep a few 1/2 shaft diameter ones in 1/2 corded drills ( my glaze area has a low ceiling outlet above to plug these in overhead) and a few med to smalls in cordless drill drills.

These are high use tools for me and when they wear out -I need one that day so I keep them in stock. The hanson (brand name) ones (the ones with the thicker stouter materials have yet to wear out -the Jiffy mixers I wear out every few years. I use flat bottom buckets do not go thru the bottoms.

The hansoms really work best on hard settled glazes  but do not mix the whole bucket as well as a Jiffy but the jiffy's do not work the hard bottom glazes as well-hence both kinds always at the ready. After mixing the bucket  with these I use wood glaze sticks to stir that glaze day.Every bucket has a stick. 

Hope this helps on choices

Mark

Attached Files


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#15 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 890 posts

Posted 12 February 2014 - 11:17 PM

I finally returned back to clay work this week after moping/cleaning the studio a bit. I

Moping! That's what bookwork does for you!

Thanks for the other info. Having extra on hand makes sense, hour drive to store here wher ethey may/may not have any in store.



#16 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,709 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 13 February 2014 - 12:25 AM

Babs I forgot to add my photo-I fixed it

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#17 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 890 posts

Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:44 AM

Thanks, envious of the one on the right, what do you call that head?



#18 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,709 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 13 February 2014 - 02:02 AM

Its a jiffy mixer PS-1

as well as the one that I use the most-and wear out the soonest.

 

 
PS-1
 
Price: $49.95
 

Made of 304 polished stainless steel, the PS-1 model is designed for heavy duty jobs in 5-10 gal. (20-40 qt.) containers.  It easily fits any 1/2" electric chucked power tool.  The PS-1 model is designed for a max speed of 800 RPMS.  Tools with 450-750 RPMS get the best rate of thorough mixing.  MIxers can be permanently installed if desired.

 

Shaft Length Container Size Top Diameter Bottom Diameter Depth of Head Shaft Diameter in. mm   in. mm in. mm in. mm in. mm 20 1/2 521 5-10 gal. 4 5/8 117 5 1/8 130 5 127 1/2 13
 

Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#19 Babs

Babs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 890 posts

Posted 13 February 2014 - 03:49 AM

Thanks Mark, looking out for this baby.



#20 Mudslinger Ceramics

Mudslinger Ceramics

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 93 posts
  • LocationAustralia

Posted 13 February 2014 - 06:16 PM

Thanks Mark, looking out for this baby.

 

 

Hi Babs,

 

....you can get a very similar one in Aus. at Bunnings Hardware stores for about $15, they're used by boat builders to mix up the fibreglass 'slurry' they use for hull repairs. I use one on a large drill for my 10-20L size buckets and its a very efficient brute!

 

Irene


Mudslinger Ceramics :   www.mudslingerceramics.net

 

'Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to.

It will stick with you and show up for better or for worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do.'

                                                                              - Robert Henri





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users