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Kilnguy

Simple Little Trick For Felting Pot Bottoms

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I like to scratch-proof the bottoms of my pots with felt  when they are placed on surfaces like shiny wood.

 

This is kind of a N0-DUH kind of method, but it's easy to do.

 

Originally, I traced the bottom of the pot onto a piece of paper, cut it out, and then traced the design onto my black felt...too much trouble.

 

So, I finally just traced the bottom of the pot with a stick of white school chalk, pressed the bottom onto the felt, and voila! the pattern was easy to see to cut with a pair of scissors. I use rubber cement.

 

I know, this is dumb, but I don't scratch the end tables any more and my wife loves that!

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The pads are used by folks who cut and polish granite counter tops, etc. Not your typical "big box" tool. There are some other on-line places, but I've yet to see them in a local retail store. I use 100 and 200 grit for 99% of my polishing.

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I use both smooth stoneware and a groggy stoneware. On the smooth stoneware, the pads seem to last a good six to eight months or more, depending on number of uses/items. On the groggy stoneware, maybe not as long -- more towards the six month range. Mostly, how long they last depends on number of items and the surface. I seem to order a box (3 or 4 200 grit, 3 or 4 100 grit) every other year.

 

I dip the pad in a bowl of water, then "wax on, wax off" the bottoms of the pots; I generally spend about 10 seconds or so, on average, to get a smooth finish. If the bottom is rough, I may start with 100 grit, then go to 200 grit. If the pads start to wear on the edges, I'll cut them into smaller pieces to make sure I get full use. The foam is pretty stiff. From time to time, I use them on bisque to remove a surface issue, but generally use them for post-glazing clean up to remove kiln wash, smooth bottoms, etc. What I like is the ability to wet sand the surface and not raise dust, etc.

 

For glaze drip removal, I use a Dremel.

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