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Green House Next To Kiln Room

dangers?

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#1 MMB

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 12:59 AM

SO I recently fabricated a green house to tie into my pole barn where my studio is at. I guess I wasnt think thinking when if came to where my kiln room was at and where the exhaust would go. The arrow points to where my kiln is inside and the exhaust comes out from that area. I have a ventilation fan there to help with any fuming. I had worried recently that maybe the fumes might pose a danger even the green house is sealed to a point. The vent windows are on the far right wall which you can see in the photo. I have been wanting to use a dark cone 6 clay that contains Maganese Dioxide and I know the fumes are toxic. I was curious about if the position green house over all could present a danger? The green house will be for a aquaponics system where there will be an open fish tank and grow beds. Like I said the greenhouse is sealed in the sense that fuming really would have to try hard to get in. Still though I question could it pose a problem especially with growing edible food.

 

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#2 Diane Puckett

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 09:14 AM

I don't know the answer to that and will be interested to see what Norm says. I do wonder about the tank in the greenhouse. Are you planning to use it for fish? The DOT placard number indicates it held a non-organic corrosive liquid.
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#3 Babs

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 06:06 PM

Bit like acid rain I'd guess if it enters your glass house. Kiln fumes tend to be very acidic if I remember correctly. Can even etch glass in windows if ventilation is poor and of course the potter inside wouldn't be very healthy.



#4 bciskepottery

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 08:53 PM

I am not sure you'll have a problem. There seems to be sufficient space between the studio and the greenhouse for any exhaust to dissipate into the air. Some folks with greenhouses have a fan mounted on the side for exhaust/intake; if you have such a fan, place it at the far end of the greenhouse where there is no chance of the fan drawing in any kiln exhaust. Also, for the times you fire your kiln, you could place a piece of plywood or other material on the outside of the window to direct the exhaust away from the greenhouse. If you are really concerned, you could always vent the kilns and put the exhaust on another wall. Just some ideas.

#5 Mark C.

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 01:10 PM

I think this is a non issue-the kiln is plenty far away from greenhouse in that photo. You have a breezeway between the buildings.

Unless this is huge gas kiln I would forget about it-it looks like a electric kiln anyway which is even less issue.

Mark


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#6 Norm Stuart

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Posted 25 January 2014 - 03:45 PM

I'm confident your sole exposure to Manganese Dioxide comes from breathing the powder especially when weighing and mixing a glaze, or ingesting it. 

 

The powder in our 50 pound bag of manganese dioxide was shipped somewhat damp to minimize this problem.

 

At kiln temperatures Manganese Dioxide loses an Oxygen and becomes Manganese Oxide.  The oxygen released is perfectly safe.

 

Manganese Oxide is not liberated until 1,945 °C; 3,533 °F.   That's 640 C (1,150 F) hotter than Cone 10.

 

 

If someone knows different information I'd be pleased to learn about it.

 

I have been wanting to use a dark cone 6 clay that contains Maganese Dioxide and I know the fumes are toxic.



#7 Mark C.

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 05:27 PM

 

I'm confident your sole exposure to Manganese Dioxide comes from breathing the powder especially when weighing and mixing a glaze, or ingesting it. 

 

The powder in our 50 pound bag of manganese dioxide was shipped somewhat damp to minimize this problem.

 

At kiln temperatures Manganese Dioxide loses an Oxygen and becomes Manganese Oxide.  The oxygen released is perfectly safe.

 

Manganese Oxide is not liberated until 1,945 °C; 3,533 °F.   That's 640 C (1,150 F) hotter than Cone 10.

 

 

If someone knows different information I'd be pleased to learn about it.

 

I have been wanting to use a dark cone 6 clay that contains Maganese Dioxide and I know the fumes are toxic.

 

Norm

I use a cone 10 Tom Coleman high  in maganese(I think 25-30% without checking). I called him years ago about its use on the phone he said he had sold it to a large ceramic dinnerware company and they had done EPA testing on the fired end product before releasing the stuff on the market.

It tested out fine and ALL the Hazards are in the making and handling Before firing. If you read up on this most harmful are from the fumes as it heats up like wielders get exposed to with managese in wielding rods.

I recall the touching  of material was not as bad? Working with an old memory here.

I always wear rubber gloves anyway.. I think John may know about this more-hope he chimes in here on this.

Mark


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#8 Norm Stuart

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 10:57 PM

Welders without a mask are breathing particulate fumes containing chromium, manganese and other metals. 

 

You may be able to simulate this type of exposure to a degree with a raku firing where you're picking the ware up hot with tongs and spritzing it with water or other procedures possibly dislodging the glaze materials airborne.  The reduction portion of the firing may make the manganese more friable.  I don't know.

 

Elke Blodgett seems to think this is how she was poisoned.  http://digitalfire.c...odgett_409.html

 

But you can't get vaporized manganese from an oxidation kiln firing.  I don't see how it would be possible.

 


Norm

 If you read up on this most harmful are from the fumes as it heats up like wielders get exposed to with managese in wielding rods.

I recall the touching  of material was not as bad? Working with an old memory here.

I always wear rubber gloves anyway.. I think John may know about this more-hope he chimes in here on this.

Mark

 






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