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CMCook52

Clay Rolled On A Slab Roller

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uh...Chris, your studio accessorizes your sweater in avatar.

Such a fashion statement! Must be a subliminal favorite!

or maybe you are just really into colors..

 

 

Marcia

Camouflage, she hides in her studio.

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I love to "play" with clay's memory.  If you have a preference in which direction you might like the clay to go when it goes into that memory mode while drying, move the clay farther than you want it, then back again eg. if creating a seam, move two ends beyond where you want them to meet first, then back them off and join.  So, if the clay's memory is engaged (see I think of it as a live thing, lol) it actually will push together rather than apart as it remembers the movement just before you joined the seam.  This has prevented cracks in places where I did not want them to be.  Fun to psych the clay.

Chilly and Karen B like this

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Does waxing really stop warping?  I handbuild everything and some times things go out of round will waxing help this?

 

Waxing can definitely help.  Since part of the reason slabs warp, is because part of them dries quicker than others, the wax, helps prevent the clay from losing moisture too quickly. 

 

Waxing can also help avoid cracking, especially of attached smaller pieces, as they would dry quicker and shrink, before the large pieces they are attached to.

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Okay, Chris & Marcia, color is fine, but nothing beats basic black--like my Brent.  It is so old it is now considered retro.  One roller with attached upper canvas that could work as a backup for Kevlar.  

 

Shirley

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Hi there.  I read some past dated posts on slab rollers and I thought I would throw the question out to all of you for a fresh opinion.  I'm looking to purchase either a 24" or possibly a 30" with the table.  I have been looking at the Northstar and Baily brands.  I would love your feedback. Thanks,

 

Fia

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I recently purchased a Bailey 24" double roller with gear reduction and a 6-foot table.  It has a short feed counter, making it much longer on the out table compared to the Northstar.  With the reduction gearing it is will take a much thicker mass of clay and feed it through, and the longer work surface is nice.  I must admit, I still do not trust feeding from 3-4" down to working slab thickness, so I still feed, turn, flip, a couple of times on the way to final thickness.  I do find that I like the adjusting mechanism on the Bailey much more than trying to line up both sides on the Northstar (I can't think of an instance where i would need a tapered slab, so adjusting both sides at once is my preference.) I bought the slabroller with the legs and table options, but another option is to buy the Bailey without the table and mount it to your own setup for a more customized approach.

 

In working with both Northstar and Bailey generated slab, there is little difference.  So the decision would be which works best for your working style. I think they are both fine machines.  I would wholeheartedly suggest that you get gear reduction for whichever you decide is for you. It just makes life easier.

 

John

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Hi there.  I read some past dated posts on slab rollers and I thought I would throw the question out to all of you for a fresh opinion.  I'm looking to purchase either a 24" or possibly a 30" with the table.  I have been looking at the Northstar and Baily brands.  I would love your feedback. Thanks,

 

Fia

Fia

I have the Shimpo 30" machine and am very happy with it. It has the features of the "professional" machines but at a more attractive price. I am a serious home potter who loves to make  pottery for the enjoyment it gives me - I give most of my pottery to family and friends and don't sell what I make. I am sure the Shimpo is not as heavily made as the Baileys or Northstar units but it has served me well for the pieces that I make. Clay-King is where I purchased my machine and at the time they had free shipping for the Shimpo slab roller

 

Mike

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To those that "drop the clay on the concrete" - am I correct in that you are rolling it on something like a piece of wood or sheetrock that can be dropped? You aren't dropping it in whatever form you are using. correct? some of my forms would not like that too much.

Thank you!

Marc

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per slab rollers, check Clay King for the Slab Master.  I know of lots of them in steady use, same specs as the Shimpo and much less spendy. It has reduction gears, 30" rollers 1 wheel adjustment.  I love mine.

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I second the Slab Master from Clay King. I use mine all the time, it's easy to adjust, rolls beautifully and best of all my husband is jealous of my nice big wheel since none of his tools a have cool wheel to turn when you use them. Lol

 

Terry

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