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Why Decorate Pots?


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#21 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:46 PM

 

"there is no bad art, and good art doesn't match your couch."

 

Well, I totally disagree with this statement Blondie! ( I found out at NCECA that Rebekah is blonde right now. :P  :D )

There are train loads of bad art and lots of homes are decorated around the Art inside ... so it does indeed match the sofa.

 

 

Hmmm, I just thought the light hair color was from the filter used on the profile photo.

 

 I live in "hi key"


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#22 TJR

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 05:18 PM

Before I started decorating all of my work, I used to use a lot of oriental Temmokus and Celadons. Since I was the studio tech for ceramics, I used to dump all of the left over stoneware glazes together and try to come up with a beautiful slop glaze.

I did such a thing with a glaze called Shambinski Jawalski special.Named after my prof., Robert Archambeau.

This glaze was golden, breaking red and blue, from rutile, I assume.

It was BEAUTIFUL!

I made a large bowl and glazed it with this glaze, even though I was running out of it. The bowl was beautiful. My friend bought it at our annual student sale.She admired it and took it home.

Later, I was at her house, and asked if I could see her bowl. She proudly displayed the bowl, full of dirt, with a plant growing in it.[She put dirt in my beautiful bowl!]

Of course, I sold it. She bought it. She can do with it what ever she wants. And she was happy.

End of story.

TJR.



#23 Pres

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 05:33 PM

The largest bowl I ever threw on the wheel was 36" in diameter glaze fired. I had done a series of calligraphic brush strokes over a nice oatmeal colored glaze. It is a very fine piece. We gave it to my wife's sister. It sits in the den full of magazines!


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#24 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:25 PM

The largest bowl I ever threw on the wheel was 36" in diameter glaze fired. I had done a series of calligraphic brush strokes over a nice oatmeal colored glaze. It is a very fine piece. We gave it to my wife's sister. It sits in the den full of magazines!

Painful!


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#25 Babs

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 01:33 AM

The largest bowl I ever threw on the wheel was 36" in diameter glaze fired. I had done a series of calligraphic brush strokes over a nice oatmeal colored glaze. It is a very fine piece. We gave it to my wife's sister. It sits in the den full of magazines!

Keeps us humble. :lol:



#26 Pugaboo

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 10:40 PM

I make pots, boxes, ceramic pieces because I want to decorate them. It's the entire reason I started doing pottery. I wanted to get my own designs and images on the surfaces of items other than paper, canvas or glass. Now I create a piece for the sole purpose of decorating it. I get an image in my head, sketch it out, do up a maquette of the piece, make it out of clay, then use one of many techniques to get the design onto it to realize my original vision. I LOVE decorating pottery it's the best combination I have discovered to combine all the art forms and imagery I love. Oh and yes I am obsessed with clay and hope I am always obsessed with it.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#27 oldlady

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 09:54 PM

tom coleman tells a story about a potter who made a fabulous bowl.  someone offered to buy it and the potter thought he would just put a ridiculous price on it and be able to keep it.  $5,000!  SOLD! 

 

later came an invitation to a party at the new house of the pot owner.  the bowl was hung on the wall above the fireplace.  seeing it from the side was great.  then the potter looked from the front and was horrified to find that the owner had glued a large piece of turquoise in the center.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#28 TheGuineaPotter

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 01:35 AM

My whole creative process revolves around pottery illustration. Lowfire glazes usually look like crappy fingernail polish, so I rely on adorable illustrations to give spice to my work. ^_^ Drawing has always been my strongest skill, so underglaze decoration really appeals to me. My pottery is okay, but the images bring my work to life! ^_^

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Guinea pig might!
Rabbit disapproval!
Dragon fire!

#29 oldlady

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

FABULOUS RABBIT!  I envy your skill !


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#30 TheGuineaPotter

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:48 PM

Aww, thank you! ^_^ Bunnies are one of my favorite things to draw. :) This bowl took ages to underglaze...it measures 11" across and 3" tall.
Guinea pig might!
Rabbit disapproval!
Dragon fire!

#31 Benzine

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 10:32 PM

I was going to ask, how long that took to decorate. Very nice, I love the illustrative quality.

Don't be so quick to discount low fire glazes though. I have found some great colors and color combinations. Just because my students seem content with glazing something solid dark blue, or bright yellow, doesn't mean that's the limit to the glazes.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#32 Babs

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 03:31 AM

Hope you put holes in teh foot rim so it can be hung! Can get bigger $$ that way!



#33 Benzine

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Posted 09 June 2014 - 10:01 AM

Pres,

 

How many pounds of clay was that?  I've never made anything nearly that size.  There was a Grad student in the Ceramics program, when I was in college, who had to make special bats, to deal with the amount of clay, he was working with.  He made some large dishes/ platters, with these "Industrial" ladder motifs added on the outside, with high temp wire.  They were quite nice.  He was a big gentleman, a shot putter on the school team.  He was also very nice and willing to help us beginning Ceramic students.  He's actually the one, who got me to think differently about centering, which is what led to my break through into actually getting it centered.  It makes sense, he was also an Education major as well!


"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#34 Patsu

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Posted Yesterday, 09:37 AM

I don't decorate functional ware hardly at all, 3 bands is as wild as I get apart from on bird feeders.  I might do a few crude bands on a pot and then 3 coats of a clear glaze.  There's a few reasons why I don't decorate.  I'm into architecture parlante where form speaks to function and carries the message of function both literally and figuratively (If I'm saying that correctly).  It is important to me that purpose is the most powerful message that a functional piece conveys.  Root purpose, base purpose. Ancient purpose. Additionally in refusing to decorate I spend no time decorating and there is no additional expense associated, which makes the functional ware more economical for people to buy, I pass that savings right on. It's not ridiculously cheap, but close to it. Could be that I prefer to make more pieces in my time and complex decoration would lessen my output which is never enough as it is.  the more output, the better I get.






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