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Wedging Table Surface Options


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#41 Benzine

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 08:48 AM

You got me beat TJR.  My pumpkins are just starting to send out their main vines.   Not even close to flowers yet.  Here in a couple weeks, I'll be guarding the plants against the vine borers, that basically wiped out my pumpkins a couple summers ago.


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#42 cync329

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 10:10 AM

I wet my canvas, stretched it over a piece of plywood, and stapled.  It's nice and tight when dry, but when I wedge clay, it absorbs some moisture and stretches and buckles.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Cynthia



#43 Judy_in_GA

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 10:13 AM

All the suggestions I have seen on canvas recommend stapling the dry canvas onto your substrate then wetting with hot water to shrink.


Judy


#44 TJR

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 12:52 PM

You got me beat TJR.  My pumpkins are just starting to send out their main vines.   Not even close to flowers yet.  Here in a couple weeks, I'll be guarding the plants against the vine borers, that basically wiped out my pumpkins a couple summers ago.

O.k. I know this is off topic, but Benzine, you could appreciate this.

I started my plants in my classroom as I have a big south facing window. I started them after spring break as I knew they would dry out over the one week holiday. I also planted squash, beets and cukes. Cukes nor beets didn't come up. Had to plant directly into the garden.

I was worried that the students would get acrylic paint on the plants. They really liked seeing them grow in the classroom. They also learned another aspect about their wacky art teacher.

TJR.



#45 Grype

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Posted 18 June 2015 - 12:56 PM

I wet my canvas, stretched it over a piece of plywood, and stapled.  It's nice and tight when dry, but when I wedge clay, it absorbs some moisture and stretches and buckles.

 

Any suggestions?

 

Cynthia

 

I would staple it dry. Then as it stretches from working with it, restaple and remove the old staples if it bothers you having them there. I did this one time and my canvas board is tight as can be.

 

I just canvased my new wedging tables until I have time to go get hardibacker board and put over them. 


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#46 Rae Reich

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 01:55 PM

I know I'm dredging up an old topic here, but please, forgive me.......
 
Since last October, I've been slowly but surely, putting together my wedging table.  [a little too slowly to please me, but hey, that's life]
 
I purchased an old Army/Navy surplus table at auction [I so love auctions!] for a paltry $5. It is all steel with a Formica top. To that, I attached 1" x 3" boards around the rim to create the forms for pouring the plaster in. I also caulked all the way around the inside of this form and up the corners. No leaks! Yay!
 
In light of everything that goes on around here on a daily basis, is it any wonder that I'm still in the pouring stage of construction? Sheesh! And I thought it took forever to build the house!?!?!? Anyhow, so far, I'm up to about 150 pounds of plaster and still not there. I have another 50 pounds standing by, just waiting for me to have the time to mix it up and pour it.
 
Once this phase is done, I have a nice piece of duck canvas ready and waiting to be stretched and secured. Thanks for the pointer of wetting it first. Silly me, I never would have thought of that!
 
The total size of the table is 30" x 48" and will serve both as a wedging table and a work surface for me to dive into hand building as well.
 
I do have a question or two regarding my process thus far. I hope one of you good people can give me a little input on it......
 
I poured another batch of plaster today and sprayed it down with rubbing alcohol to release the surface tension of the plaster, thereby negating the bubbles trapped within. About an hour later, I noticed not only a few popped bubbles, but that they are also connecting to each other with small cracks. Through 150+ pounds, this has never happened. Should I be concerned? As I said, I still have at least another 50 pounds to go, maybe even more. [I suck at estimating quantities for a project like this. :unsure: ]
 
I had spoken to a rep from DAP back in October and he stated that for my purposes, there shouldn't be a need for any form of rebar in the slab, so long as I poured it in stages and let each batch cure thoroughly. Now I'm beginning to wonder.
 
From a weight standpoint, this is one heavy bugger of a wedging table. Even now, I have a hard time getting it to budge so much as a fraction of an inch. I have used it with a small piece of plywood over it just to wedge up some clay for wheel projects and so far, things seem to be just spiffy. I guess what I'm hoping to hear is that it will be just fine, hairline cracks not withstanding.  Your thoughts????


That is going to be a Deluxe work table! Sounds like the alcohol spray wasn't enough to dislodge air bubbles. It might be interesting to carve down into one to investigate, but it probably isn't going to be structural unless the slab supports are letting it sag. If you're confident of the support, when you pour the next layer you might tap, hammer, smack or pound the sides of the form, set up some form of vibration before it sets, as well as using the spray. Did you tell or show the DAP rep how big the slab is and how it's supported?

#47 curt

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Posted 21 June 2015 - 06:45 AM

Hardipanel (or similar) compressed concrete sheeting.  Bought from hardware supply stores.  Often used as under-flooring in wet areas in new buildings.  Sold in big sheets like plywood.

 

Very smooth surface, but slightly absorbent so it will remove moisture from clay little by little and clay does not stick (unless it is very wet of course).  No need for canvas.  

 

Very easy to clean, just sponge off.  And even when dry clay has baked on, it can be scraped quickly and easily with a plastic puddy knife, or even a metal paint scraper with no problem, so cleaning is a breeze.

 

Very heavy which means it does not move around once it is in situ, even when wedging up a bag or three of clay.  The challenge of course is getting a suitable frame to put under it, and then getting it in situ, which will require some strong backs.






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