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WildCelticRose

Creamation Urns, Firing And Sealing...

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I'm assuming that this may be one of the weirdest questions asked on this forum.

I have been comissioned to create an urn for the ashes of someone's mother.

My first thought on sealing the urn was to use a silicone adhesive.  It sticks to the ceramic ware well and is waterproof.

Then I wondered...  (this is where it gets weird...)

What would happen if I put the ashes inside the urn for the glaze firing and used the glaze to fuse it permanently shut?

My concern of course, is that since a cone 6 firing is hotter than the actual cremation process, would these ashes combust and cause the urn to explode.

As you can well imaigne, I don't want my friend's mother blowing up inside of my kiln. (I told you this was going to be a weird one)

Cremated ashes consist of: dry calcium phosphates with some minor minerals, such as salts of sodium and potassium.

I don't supposed anyone else has tired this?

If anyone has any ideas for sealing that are better then the silicone adhesive, I'd love to hear them as well. I'm not trying this unless I know it's not likely to end badly.

Thanks in advance for humoring me by reading this.

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The ashes would not explode but may flux a bit. I think you may be better off to supply the urn and let the guardian of the ashes put them into the urn and seal it. Many crematoriums give a temporary container with the urn when they return the ashes. A Silicon seal is an acceptable method.

Marcia

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Thanks everyone.

It seems that my initial thought (seal with silicone) was the best idea.

I may see about incorporating some of the ashes into the glaze.  I'm actually making a piece of garden art, a bird bath.  Rather than icorporate the ashes into the base, I am going to house the ashes in a separate container to be housed inside the hollow base.  I don't like the idea of raccooons knocking over the birdbath and potentially breaking it and spilling the ashes.

I might also create a small pendant with ashes incorporated.

mregecko likes this

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I do several urns a year, I always supply a small tube of two part epoxy with each urn.  I let them transfer the ashes, my luck I'd sneeze or something and end up dumping their loved one all over.  I don't do the plastic bag since most of those who come to me for urns, want my urns since they are not glazed and will decompose faster.

 

Chad

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What would happen if I put the ashes inside the urn for the glaze firing and used the glaze to fuse it permanently shut? My concern of course, is that since a cone 6 firing is hotter than the actual cremation process, would these ashes combust and cause the urn to explode...

...I may see about incorporating some of the ashes into the glaze

...The ashes...may flux a bit

Home Studio Crematorium 101.

 

Don't waste electricity by running your kiln underloaded: fire your neighbor to Cone 6.

 

How My Friend's Mother Contributed to My New Ash Glaze Recipe.

 

Dear Abby,

As you can well imagine, I don't want my friend's mother blowing up inside of my kiln...

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I've told my children (and husband) that I will make them a set of dishes with their Dad's ashes incorporated into the glaze.  This has all been said in jest but I can see making something tangible and "touchable" with a loved ones ashes. (Or a furry child's ashes.)

 

Very interesting thread!

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I have incorporated a small amount of ashes into urns, and had no problem with the bisque firing.  I never did a glaze firing because I finished them with acrylics.  Each person got one piece with loose ashes inside, and this piece was "released" at a site that meant something to my nephew, and they also got a piece to keep, that had some of the ashes wedged right into the clay.

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Silicone can be removed and you could have access later if you want it to be permant use JB wield quick set  epoxy on lid. The only way in later would be smash the pot.

I'm starting to feel this topic should be pinned as it is reoccurring a lot .

Mark

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I think this the third time for this topic.A five pound stoneware jar with domed lid and flange will do the trick. The ashes come in a plastic bag with a lead seal. Put the ashes in the urn and then use two part epoxy to seal the lid.

TJR

Marcia Selsor likes this

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Benzine,

 

Was it an experimental research?

Wow, I'm replying pretty late to this....

 

I did some research, because I needed to know how big to make the urns for my Grandparents.  We went out to eat for Father's Day, my wife and I, my parents and my Grandparents.  Then afterwards my Grandpa said, "By the way, can you make us a couple urns...."

Kind of unexpected.  So I started researching common forms, and the necessary size.  

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Nope, I was outbid.  

 

It was quite nice.  The person posting it said that someone said it was old.  Someone, has a loose definition of "Old".  But that school district probably has the money to get new every so often.

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