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Foil Saggar Results


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#21 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 02:01 PM

Interesting info Bob. Where does one begin to look for citric, tartaric and oxalic acids?

I have been avoiding spritzing but these chemicals may not be as hazardous. 

I wouldn't say I have perfected Obvara but it is fascinating. I can try something with it in January. I will be away during the holidays visiting family. and friends.

I'll let you know what happens.

Marcia



#22 Bob Coyle

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 06:26 PM

Citric acid you can buy in many markets or health food stores. Tartaric acid is a little harder but chemical supply houses have it and probably e-bay.

Oxalic acid you get at Home Depot. It is the only one that is toxic...  but , since you are not going to eat it, and since it just burns up when flamed with no toxic fumes, there is no problem. 

 

Anyway keep it in mind next time you do your magic...  Have fun on the holidays :)



#23 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:47 AM

Citric acid you can buy in many markets or health food stores. Tartaric acid is a little harder but chemical supply houses have it and probably e-bay.

Oxalic acid you get at Home Depot. It is the only one that is toxic...  but , since you are not going to eat it, and since it just burns up when flamed with no toxic fumes, there is no problem. 

 

Anyway keep it in mind next time you do your magic...  Have fun on the holidays :)

Thanks, Bob. I'll look in the grocery stores. I have citrus skins that also do some things but not all that interesting yet. I need to understand what to do with them.



#24 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:12 PM

Here is my favorite from the recent batch of foil sagger pots.

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#25 Benzine

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 08:31 PM

Excellent Marcia, what did you have in the sagger?


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#26 Babs

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 08:43 PM

Assuming I don't get the foil in touch with the electrics, how do you tink it would go in an electric kiln?



#27 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:13 PM

the chemical fumes could damage the coils if they escape from the foil saggars.. The foil can begin to break dawn. Melting point in 1100 but the foil can go higher depending.
I know some people who have done it in electric , but I can't recommend it.

Marcia

#28 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:10 PM

Excellent Marcia, what did you have in the sagger?

I put some lemon skins inside some of the pots. I brushed, sponge dabbed, various nasty chemicals like nickel chloride, copper sulphate, etc. and sprinkled some salts on the surfaces with a damp sponge. I have a lot of old chemicals around some dating back to the 60s but their labels look more like they are from the 30s.. I like silver nitrate, table salt, epsom salt, strontium chloride, etc. If I don't like the way it turned out, I 'll put some more stuff on it and fire it again.
Marcia

#29 Babs

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:20 PM

Assuming I don't get the foil in touch with the electrics, how do you tink it would go in an electric kiln?

Thanks Marcia, I use tartaric and citric in some lemon syrup i make for a summer drink, get both of these products in baking areas of supermarkets here. I think, hmm, oxalic acid is found in silverbett, chard stalks and leaves, and there is another acid in rhubarb leaves may be worth fiddling with.

Lemon Syrup

juice of 12 lemons

Rind of 6

1 tablespoon citric

1 Tablespoon tartaric acid

4lbs sugar.

Dissolve the above in 3 pints of boiling water.

Cool '

Bottle.

Pour an inch in a large glass top with soda water or iced water.

MMM

Great after a hot day in the pottery shed!



#30 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 10:25 PM

I will have to give that a try. Sometimes the heat down here is unbearable. My lemon tree still has lemons and is blooming already,
I haven't looked in the grocery store for this. I will try to do that.
.
Marcia

#31 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 03:50 AM

Marcia: I like the soft, gray touch of your new pieces. Congrats on the success.

 

Hmmmm, I always wanted to try the foil saggars too in an electric kiln, but was a bit hesitant because of the fumes. I think I'll wait a bit longer...

 

Babs: thanks bunches for the recipe. I'am sure summer will come along some day....


Evelyne Schoenmann
Studio: schoenmann ceramics
In love with alternative firing methods
www.schoenmann-ceramics.ch


#32 Benzine

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 08:13 AM

That's quite a "Witches Brew" you use Marcia, and that term is in no way an assumption or implication of your personality.....

You say you use silver nitrate. I wonder what would happen, if you used an exhausted photo fixer, which would contain silver haylide?
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#33 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 08:24 AM

witches brew sounds accurate. I just mix small quantities 50 grams and 1/2 pint of hot water. I apply with a sponge.I don't want any left overs.
I don't know about the silver solution. Sounds like it could be interesting. I like the granules and dab them onto the surface lightly otherwise there is too much black. Lightly and they fume silver. Epsom salts made clouds or bleached out some of the color. Plan to try as granules.
Marcia

#34 Benzine

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:54 AM

Marcia, I just so happened to be mixing up photo chemicals this morning. After this conversation, I reread the ingredients list. I would wager many of them would yield interesting results. The developer has some type of alkaline agent, the stop bath a mild acid, and the two part fixer I use has both. The acid portion is sulfuric acid....It smells fabulous. And many of the chemicals come in powdered form, which would be handy for sagger. I even have some used fixer, that I let sit out, as it can't go down the drain, and it crystalized nicely. That could easily be used.
"Anything worth believing, is worth questioning"

#35 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:17 PM

The foil is the sagger. I am not familiar with these as it has been about 30 years since I worked in a dark room. Just follow the precautions for working with these chemicals.
Marcia

#36 Babs

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:22 PM

The foil is the sagger. I am not familiar with these as it has been about 30 years since I worked in a dark room. Just follow the precautions for working with these chemicals.
Marcia

Go YOU mad haut rakuteurs! I reread my kitchen recipe and you have to add 1 Tablespoon of Epsom salts with all the rest before water is added, to the syrup recipe mentioned above!

Refreshing. Have made it without but the old recipe from my granny has it in it, and she'd know.



#37 Bob Coyle

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 08:18 PM

I recently tried potassium permanganate solution for some of my "f aux" pit fired pots. I was expecting it to produce a black manganese dioxide color but instead I got a medium tan buff color. Not what I expected but it could be another color for your palette.

 

I should mention potassium permanganate is a strong oxidizer, but if you keep the solution in a bottle away from organic materials, it is no worse then ferric chloride. Wear gloves since it stains your hands if you get it on you.

 

After organic chemistry lab, us organic chemists used to look like we had a hell of a nicotine problem with the nitric acid and permanganate stains on ourfingers.

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#38 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 09:25 AM

Bob,
this has Potassium Permangnate. It was among my pieces from last May. It is currently on display at the Yellowstone Art Museum 45th Annual Auction.I get pinkish browns with this.I listed the chemicals in a post in May or June.



Marcia

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#39 Bob Coyle

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:32 AM

Beautiful piece Marcia. I love the subtle gradations of color you get on your pots.

 

I have been trying to get some blues with cobalt salts but end up with mostly greys. Have you done any work with cobalt salts?



#40 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 12:34 PM

I am using cobalt sulphate. It is a bit dark. Need to lighten up. The cloudy center one is cobalt caliphate and epsom salts
http://community.cer...oup2-copysmall/
Marcia




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